Message Board Search Tool
Banding Code Translator | Recent Rare Bird Sightings
©2016 Christopher Taylor (Kiwifoto.com)
calbirds        ebird rarities [map]
filter rba/cbc
  displaying last 25 messages...

trending birds in last 30 posts.
Last 5 Posts:
· Bar-tailed Godwit continues in Alviso August 28 (Aug 29, 2016)
· Recent San Diego Pelagic Trip (Aug 28, 2016)
· Re: [nwcalbird] Re: [CALBIRDS] Harpagus ID (Aug 26, 2016)
· Re: Arcata Raptor: yet another hypothesis (Aug 27, 2016)
· Arcata Raptor: yet another hypothesis (Aug 27, 2016)
  1. Bar-tailed Godwit continues in Alviso August 28 LINK
    DATE: Aug 29, 2016 @ 6:30am, 2 day(s) ago
    Birders:
    
    Yesterday afternoon George Peyton found the continuing Bar-tailed Godwit in pond A17. He is unable to post, so enlisted help. Here are excerpts from George’s email:
    
    "Today (i.e., August 28) I watched the Bar-tailed Godwit from the Pumphouse on the levee looking into A-17 from 1:40 p.m. until past 2 p.m. ... There have not been any reports of the Bar-tailed Godwit posted today, although there have been two reports of a Ruff near the EEC, and Jim Lomax reported two Wandering Tattlers at Alviso. All the birders I ran into hiking out the levee said no one had seen it today, and I saw no birders coming back, and no one was there when I spotted it.
    
    "It took me 9 scans by scope of the full A17 to find it, but when the bird finally appeared, it was in good scope view in the middle of A17.”
    
    Serving as the messenger . . .
    
    Dave Quady
    
    Berkeley, California
    
    davequady@...
  2. -back to top-
  3. Recent San Diego Pelagic Trip LINK
    DATE: Aug 28, 2016 @ 1:55pm, 2 day(s) ago
    The San Diego pelagic on Aug. 21, 2016 started off with the unusual target of an albino cormorant that had been reported on the bait docks the previous week. We found and photographed the bird on the barrier around the submarine base, and what an unusual sight it was – a pure white Brandt’s Cormorant. We were also successful with our more traditional targets, getting good looks at CRAVERI'S MURRELETS, which was a life bird for several birders on board.We counted 10 on the day, which was quite good for the windy conditions. Other species of note included LEACH'S STORM-PETRELS, with perhaps twenty five for the trip. The majority were dark-rumped or intermediate white-rumped chapmani subspecies, but a couple of bright white-rumped birds had us looking at photos for possible Townsend's or Wilson's Storm-Petrels. These were likely the nominate Leach's Storm-Petrels. Although we had no Brown Boobies on the channel buoys, we did manage to get several farther offshore, which was another target bird for several of our participants. A bit of good news on the seabird reproduction front, Black-vented Shearwaters appear to have done well this year as we saw good numbers on bright fresh plumaged birds I take to be birds of the year.All clearly thriving on this year’s mass of Northern Anchovy locally.Sea surface temps were 69-73 mostly 70 degrees.
    Partial species list offshore:
    Pink-footed Shearwater67 Sooty Shearwater
    
    7 Black-vented Shearwater
    
    750 Leach's Storm-Petrel (chapmani) 25 Leach's Storm-Petrel (leucorhoa)
    
    2 Ashy Storm-Petrel
    
    3 Black Storm-Petrel
    
    110 Brown Booby
    
    4 Red-necked Phalarope
    
     40 CRAVERI'S MURRELET
    
     10 Cassin's Auklet
    
    1 Common Tern
    
    12 Elegant Tern
    
    108
    
    Dave Povey Dulzura
    
    The next BVAS / Grande trip is Sept 25th and only has 9 spots left; call 619 223-1627 to reserve your spot.
  4. -back to top-
  5. Re: [nwcalbird] Re: [CALBIRDS] Harpagus ID LINK
    DATE: Aug 26, 2016 @ 11:23pm, 4 day(s) ago
  6. -back to top-
  7. Re: Arcata Raptor: yet another hypothesis LINK
    DATE: Aug 27, 2016 @ 11:38am, 3 day(s) ago
    I'm so sorry folks. I should have quit 12 years ago, when I was first medically diagnosed with the delusions and psychosis that comes with the upper end of severe bipolar disorder. These have shattered everything I know, except my 11-year marriage to the most understanding and patient woman alive. I promise it won't happen again--I'm shutting down my email account and losing everyone's numbers.
    
    Thanks for a great life of birding, though.
    
    Tristan
    
    On Sat, Aug 27, 2016 at 12:44 AM, Tristan McKee < atmckee@... > wrote:
    The number of traits suggesting the Arcata bird may be a Japanese Sparrowhawk is a slap in the face. This species breeds in Siberia and winters in the Pacific Islands--I can't imagine a better raptor candidate for vagrancy here, so I feel pretty ignorant for not having considered it:
    
    --Often rufous in hindneck.
    
    --Reddish eyes and relatively dark, barred underwings in males.
    
    --Black goatee.
    
    --Grayish head in subadults and adults.
    
    --Thick, widely-spaced bars on sides of belly in younger birds.
    
    --Very broad chest.
    
    --Often buff barring in primaries.
    
    --4-5 projecting primary tips on spread wing.
    
    --Some rust in upperwing coverts.
    
    --Often slightly notched tail tip.
    
    --long, thin tarsi.
    
    --Some white in scapulars.
    
    --Thick black bars on (non-juvenile) tail.
    
    I could go on and on, but it is late, and I'd rather just try to study the bird some more tomorrow. Thanks for everyone's contributions--I appreciate the opportunity to learn about raptors both local and exotic. Here are a bunch of Japanese Sparrowhawk photos from the web.
    
    Tristan
    
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/ 38396164@N00/3002255052/in/ photolist-5zikQ9-5s7qf8- 4mkhpD-4mzVuE-pTcKEu-5ELVht- stoBiY-qmBcNQ-dmefLY-8QbzK9- qZWW3n-rWt6rc-5snhMD-duT1vE- 9qfiQs-qTLWvX-9V6a7W-5B7WsS- jtQ221-soAoSg-dme7P1-pBWqBv- q3hSNC-o94uLx-nGre5w-813RpT- nMmFtq-9Vgybu-8WTcKH-dmefWC- nDCKga-pMbjLD-7WgohB-dC23Eb- nJwZbg-9Vgydj-pVpkmd-d4d5p1- 9YxHx1-pnRunY-nUyeq8-qTESnQ- qBbbwq-b5Wgrc-dnbku2-fgGmFD- q4a6dY-7F796e-ayGDCr-nUyekZ
    
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/ 38396164@N00/2200255616/in/ photolist-4mqTkE-GEUF3y- 4mpx47-5zikQ9-5s7qf8-4mkhpD- 4mzVuE-pTcKEu-5ELVht-stoBiY- qmBcNQ-dmefLY-8QbzK9-qZWW3n- rWt6rc-5snhMD-duT1vE-9qfiQs- qTLWvX-9V6a7W-5B7WsS-jtQ221- soAoSg-dme7P1-pBWqBv-q3hSNC- o94uLx-nGre5w-813RpT-nMmFtq- 9Vgybu-8WTcKH-dmefWC-nDCKga- pMbjLD-7WgohB-dC23Eb-nJwZbg- 9Vgydj-pVpkmd-d4d5p1-9YxHx1- pnRunY-nUyeq8-qTESnQ-qBbbwq- b5Wgrc-dnbku2-fgGmFD-q4a6dY
    
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/ 53435640@N05/15902175374/in/ photolist-qedNHu-nU1NDM- 4mzR5G-4nYKpZ-4mqTkE-GEUF3y- 4mpx47-5zikQ9-5s7qf8-4mkhpD- 4mzVuE-pTcKEu-5ELVht-stoBiY- qmBcNQ-dmefLY-8QbzK9-qZWW3n- rWt6rc-5snhMD-duT1vE-9qfiQs- qTLWvX-9V6a7W-5B7WsS-jtQ221- soAoSg-dme7P1-pBWqBv-q3hSNC- o94uLx-nGre5w-813RpT-nMmFtq- 9Vgybu-8WTcKH-dmefWC-nDCKga- pMbjLD-7WgohB-dC23Eb-nJwZbg- 9Vgydj-pVpkmd-d4d5p1-9YxHx1- pnRunY-nUyeq8-qTESnQ-qBbbwq
    
    http://orientalbirdimages.org/ search.phpBird_Image_ID= 48978&Bird_ID=905&Bird_Family_ ID=&Location=
    
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/ lowchoonhow/15343508034/in/ photolist-ayGDCr-HQpyhL- d4d5p1-9YxHx1-pnRunY-nUyeq8- qTESnQ-qBbbwq-b5Wgrc-dnbku2- fgGmFD-q4a6dY-7F796e-nUyekZ- aQ8E6D-pc4bYb-dsGuc1-fgWAHm- ap7ihf-eHTE2Z-o2bCZE-exdutN- 8W4umE-o2zhGN-kJfgYz-qJgshq- nSVxty-9KCpxW-dme7Uf-o2AoKr- 8WTb5H-aTf9ji-orVjg9-dsGudb- dmfANe-aJDTye-dmebTi-dQACqx- pnRuky-4k53sB-dC23KJ-cwHFZS- pRCmP2-nC53U5-qjED6P-nUtmmm- aF2b64-dmfFfh-Bcy5wg-m6NeG1
    
    http://www011.upp.so-net.ne. jp/morochan/tangkoko/image/ japanese_sparrowhawk.jpg
    
    http://www.hbw.com/ibc/ species/53068/photos
    
    http://strix.main.jp/p=25680
    
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/ handsomeboy/15675640076/in/ photolist-pTcKEu-5ELVht- stoBiY-qmBcNQ-dmefLY-8QbzK9- qZWW3n-rWt6rc-5snhMD-duT1vE- 9qfiQs-qTLWvX-9V6a7W-5B7WsS- jtQ221-soAoSg-dme7P1-pBWqBv- q3hSNC-o94uLx-nGre5w-813RpT- nMmFtq-9Vgybu-8WTcKH-dmefWC- nDCKga-pMbjLD-7WgohB-dC23Eb- nJwZbg-9Vgydj-pVpkmd-d4d5p1- 9YxHx1-pnRunY-nUyeq8-qTESnQ- qBbbwq-b5Wgrc-dnbku2-fgGmFD- q4a6dY-7F796e-ayGDCr-nUyekZ- aQ8E6D-pc4bYb-dsGuc1-fgWAHm
    
    http://orientalbirdimages.org/ search.phpBird_ID=905
  8. -back to top-
  9. Arcata Raptor: yet another hypothesis LINK
    DATE: Aug 27, 2016 @ 12:44am, 4 day(s) ago
    The number of traits suggesting the Arcata bird may be a Japanese Sparrowhawk is a slap in the face. This species breeds in Siberia and winters in the Pacific Islands--I can't imagine a better raptor candidate for vagrancy here, so I feel pretty ignorant for not having considered it:
    
    --Often rufous in hindneck.
    
    --Reddish eyes and relatively dark, barred underwings in males.
    
    --Black goatee.
    
    --Grayish head in subadults and adults.
    
    --Thick, widely-spaced bars on sides of belly in younger birds.
    
    --Very broad chest.
    
    --Often buff barring in primaries.
    
    --4-5 projecting primary tips on spread wing.
    
    --Some rust in upperwing coverts.
    
    --Often slightly notched tail tip.
    
    --long, thin tarsi.
    
    --Some white in scapulars.
    
    --Thick black bars on (non-juvenile) tail.
    
    I could go on and on, but it is late, and I'd rather just try to study the bird some more tomorrow. Thanks for everyone's contributions--I appreciate the opportunity to learn about raptors both local and exotic. Here are a bunch of Japanese Sparrowhawk photos from the web.
    
    Tristan
    
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/38396164@N00/3002255052/in/photolist-5zikQ9-5s7qf8-4mkhpD-4mzVuE-pTcKEu-5ELVht-stoBiY-qmBcNQ-dmefLY-8QbzK9-qZWW3n-rWt6rc-5snhMD-duT1vE-9qfiQs-qTLWvX-9V6a7W-5B7WsS-jtQ221-soAoSg-dme7P1-pBWqBv-q3hSNC-o94uLx-nGre5w-813RpT-nMmFtq-9Vgybu-8WTcKH-dmefWC-nDCKga-pMbjLD-7WgohB-dC23Eb-nJwZbg-9Vgydj-pVpkmd-d4d5p1-9YxHx1-pnRunY-nUyeq8-qTESnQ-qBbbwq-b5Wgrc-dnbku2-fgGmFD-q4a6dY-7F796e-ayGDCr-nUyekZ
    
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/38396164@N00/2200255616/in/photolist-4mqTkE-GEUF3y-4mpx47-5zikQ9-5s7qf8-4mkhpD-4mzVuE-pTcKEu-5ELVht-stoBiY-qmBcNQ-dmefLY-8QbzK9-qZWW3n-rWt6rc-5snhMD-duT1vE-9qfiQs-qTLWvX-9V6a7W-5B7WsS-jtQ221-soAoSg-dme7P1-pBWqBv-q3hSNC-o94uLx-nGre5w-813RpT-nMmFtq-9Vgybu-8WTcKH-dmefWC-nDCKga-pMbjLD-7WgohB-dC23Eb-nJwZbg-9Vgydj-pVpkmd-d4d5p1-9YxHx1-pnRunY-nUyeq8-qTESnQ-qBbbwq-b5Wgrc-dnbku2-fgGmFD-q4a6dY
    
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/53435640@N05/15902175374/in/photolist-qedNHu-nU1NDM-4mzR5G-4nYKpZ-4mqTkE-GEUF3y-4mpx47-5zikQ9-5s7qf8-4mkhpD-4mzVuE-pTcKEu-5ELVht-stoBiY-qmBcNQ-dmefLY-8QbzK9-qZWW3n-rWt6rc-5snhMD-duT1vE-9qfiQs-qTLWvX-9V6a7W-5B7WsS-jtQ221-soAoSg-dme7P1-pBWqBv-q3hSNC-o94uLx-nGre5w-813RpT-nMmFtq-9Vgybu-8WTcKH-dmefWC-nDCKga-pMbjLD-7WgohB-dC23Eb-nJwZbg-9Vgydj-pVpkmd-d4d5p1-9YxHx1-pnRunY-nUyeq8-qTESnQ-qBbbwq
    
    http://orientalbirdimages.org/search.phpBird_Image_ID=48978&Bird_ID=905&Bird_Family_ID=&Location=
    
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/lowchoonhow/15343508034/in/photolist-ayGDCr-HQpyhL-d4d5p1-9YxHx1-pnRunY-nUyeq8-qTESnQ-qBbbwq-b5Wgrc-dnbku2-fgGmFD-q4a6dY-7F796e-nUyekZ-aQ8E6D-pc4bYb-dsGuc1-fgWAHm-ap7ihf-eHTE2Z-o2bCZE-exdutN-8W4umE-o2zhGN-kJfgYz-qJgshq-nSVxty-9KCpxW-dme7Uf-o2AoKr-8WTb5H-aTf9ji-orVjg9-dsGudb-dmfANe-aJDTye-dmebTi-dQACqx-pnRuky-4k53sB-dC23KJ-cwHFZS-pRCmP2-nC53U5-qjED6P-nUtmmm-aF2b64-dmfFfh-Bcy5wg-m6NeG1
    
    http://www011.upp.so-net.ne.jp/morochan/tangkoko/image/japanese_sparrowhawk.jpg
    
    http://www.hbw.com/ibc/species/53068/photos
    
    http://strix.main.jp/p=25680
    
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/handsomeboy/15675640076/in/photolist-pTcKEu-5ELVht-stoBiY-qmBcNQ-dmefLY-8QbzK9-qZWW3n-rWt6rc-5snhMD-duT1vE-9qfiQs-qTLWvX-9V6a7W-5B7WsS-jtQ221-soAoSg-dme7P1-pBWqBv-q3hSNC-o94uLx-nGre5w-813RpT-nMmFtq-9Vgybu-8WTcKH-dmefWC-nDCKga-pMbjLD-7WgohB-dC23Eb-nJwZbg-9Vgydj-pVpkmd-d4d5p1-9YxHx1-pnRunY-nUyeq8-qTESnQ-qBbbwq-b5Wgrc-dnbku2-fgGmFD-q4a6dY-7F796e-ayGDCr-nUyekZ-aQ8E6D-pc4bYb-dsGuc1-fgWAHm
    
    http://orientalbirdimages.org/search.phpBird_ID=905
  10. -back to top-
  11. Re: [nwcalbird] Re: [CALBIRDS] Harpagus ID LINK
    DATE: Aug 26, 2016 @ 11:11pm, 4 day(s) ago
    Not having explored the thought before, I am finding that some of the Asian sparrowhawks, particularly Japanese, Levant, and Eurasian sparrowhawks, would easily send us into the current confused state. Check out subadults of these three species and stay tuned...
    
    Besides, Asian vagrants are way more politically correct than Amazonian ones!
    
    Tristan
    
    On Fri, Aug 26, 2016 at 9:37 PM, Chet Ogan < chet_ogan@... > wrote:
    This time of year studying birds can be extremely challenging.  Young birds as well as adults are going through successive molts. First thing I would consider before for unusual migrants is what is common and expected here. Just look at the Facebook websites and the photos of juvenile birds begging an ID are showing up. 
    
    My two cents.
    
    Sent from my U.S. Cellular® Smartphone
    
    -------- Original message --------
    From: "Tristan McKee atmckee@... [CALBIRDS]"
    Date:08/26/2016 9:22 PM (GMT-07:00)
    To:
    Cc: calbirds@yahoogroups.com , nwcal bird@yahoogroups.com
    Subject: Re: [nwcalbird] Re: [CALBIRDS] Harpagus ID
    
     
    
    I am wondering why a well-known trait would not appear in the first 200 photos I looked at. Perhaps you are referring to the pale rusty coloration on the SIDES of the neck of ADULTS This is not like the dark rufous on the actual back of the neck of this immature bird, which is isolated from the pale areas of the underparts, rather than meeting them directly.
    
    Does the Merlin also have a rufous hindneck and rufous in the upperwing coverts
    
    I would not classify the eyes as particularly light or dark--though difficult to judge and extremely dependent on lighting, they appear to be pale brown, with a reddish tinge in some shots.
    
    I really don't mind at all if you keep trying, Rob. If you don't have time to address any of the traits I pointed out two emails back, which no-one else has come out and disputed yet, though, I have to  wonder why you are getting involved. Although--I have heard that the desire to discredit Tristan (who, by the way, claims no credit or skill at all) makes for quite a rewarding sport. :-)
    
    I'd say we should start by explaining the thick black goatee on both a Merlin and a Cooper's Hawk in the same vicinity. My previous email also still exists, and I would like to hear about its errors.
    
    TMcK
    
    On Fri, Aug 26, 2016 at 7:27 PM, Rob Fowler < migratoriusfwlr@... > wrote:
    
    Cooper's Hawk is well known to have a rusty hind neck or nape. 
    
    Also, if these are the same birds then why does one have a pale eye and one a dark eye
    
    Rob Fowler
    
    On Friday, August 26, 2016, Tristan McKee < atmckee@... > wrote:
    
    I agree with Jim that a weird hybrid seems more likely, although I
    
    have racked my brain without coming up with a reasonable combination.
    
    One interesting trait that effectively eliminates the idea that the
    
    perched photos represent different individuals is the rusty hindneck,
    
    which doesn't seem typical of ANY of the species discussed thus far.
    
    Of course, it is difficult to ascertain what is typical in young
    
    Rufous-thighed,as photos on the web are few and far between.
    
    Tristan
    
    On 8/26/16, Tristan McKee < atmckee@... > wrote:
    
    > Thanks folks. I am certainly glad to bend to the general whims and
    
    > consensus of the birding community, and I am definitely not committed to
    
    > any particular ID for this bird. It does seem to be a good opportunity to
    
    > learn a thing or two about Merlins and Accipiters, which many California
    
    > birders have seemingly never studied carefully.
    
    >
    
    > Rufous-thighed Kite is in fact a long-distance migrant--see the recent
    
    > paper, easily found on the web.
    
    >
    
    > The "Sharp-shinned Hawk" from the first date has largely dark underwings.
    
    > That should give one pause. See:
    
    >
    
    > https://www.flickr.com/photos/ 101791769@N08/28599599934/in/d ateposted/
    
    >
    
    > and
    
    >
    
    > https://www.flickr.com/photos/ 101791769@N08/29148550035/in/
    
    > album-72157672700208176/
    
    >
    
    > No Sharp-shinned Hawk, let alone an adult male, shows any pattern close to
    
    > this.
    
    >
    
    > Sharp-shinned Hawks also have two thin dark bands and one thick dark band
    
    > beyond the undertail coverts, while this bird has two thick dark bands.
    
    >
    
    > Among many other things that are obviously wrong for that species is the
    
    > fact that only four outer primaries project noticeably in the bird in
    
    > question, while Sharp-shinned consistently shows six.
    
    >
    
    > The "Cooper's Hawk" photos show thick, widely-spaced dark bars on the sides
    
    > of the belly, not found in any plumage of any North American Accipiter. It
    
    > also has distinctly buff-barred primaries and tarsi far too thin for
    
    > Cooper's, among many things.
    
    >
    
    > https://www.flickr.com/photos/ 101791769@N08/28599592294/in/a lbum-72157672700208176/
    
    >
    
    > and
    
    >
    
    > https://www.flickr.com/photos/ 101791769@N08/29221930675/in/a lbum-72157672700208176/
    
    >
    
    > The "Merlin" was the size of a large Cooper's Hawk and shows a "goatee"
    
    > characteristic of Harpagus. Furthermore, its bill shape and rusty feather
    
    > in the upperwing coverts would be bizarre-looking on a Merlin. A
    
    > feather-by-feather analysis of the underparts and details of the facial
    
    > pattern make the idea that these are two different individuals, much less
    
    > two different species, rather far-fetched.
    
    >
    
    > https://www.flickr.com/photos/ 101791769@N08/28612068294/in/a lbum-72157672700208176/
    
    >
    
    > and
    
    >
    
    > https://www.flickr.com/photos/ 101791769@N08/29156249201/in/a lbum-72157672700208176/
    
    >
    
    > The bird gave a loud, descending, wailing call, unlike any falcon or
    
    > Accipiter.
    
    >
    
    > It is certainly understandable that folks are getting both falcon and
    
    > Accipiter impressions from the bird, if it is indeed a Harpagus, for a
    
    > combination of the two is what members of the genus look like,
    
    > superficially.
    
    >
    
    > Best,
    
    > Tristan
    
    >
    
    > On Fri, Aug 26, 2016 at 3:07 PM, James Pike < jimpike444@... > wrote:
    
    >
    
    >> Glad to be of service, Rob. Maybe it is a Single-Toothed Kite after all.
    
    >>
    
    >> Jim
    
    >> HB
    
    >>
    
    >> On Fri, Aug 26, 2016 at 1:59 PM, Rob Fowler migratoriusfwlr@...
    
    >> [CALBIRDS] < CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups. com > wrote:
    
    >>
    
    >>>
    
    >>>
    
    >>> Sterling, since you jumped in I might as well too. Biting. At least then
    
    >>> maybe people can stop contacting me and asking about these birds and what
    
    >>> I
    
    >>> think about them.
    
    >>>
    
    >>> Tristan's photos show a Merlin, a wet juvenile Cooper's Hawk, and an
    
    >>> adult Sharp-shinned. Jim Pike, that is why you are having a hard time:
    
    >>> because there are THREE different species involved from TWO families!
    
    >>>
    
    >>> Thanks,
    
    >>>
    
    >>> Rob Fowler
    
    >>> Humboldt County
    
    >>>
    
    >>>
    
    >>>
    
    >>
    
    >>
    
    >
    
    --
    Rob Fowler
    McKinleyville, CA
    
    www.fowleropebirding.com
  12. -back to top-
  13. Re: [nwcalbird] Re: [CALBIRDS] Harpagus ID LINK
    DATE: Aug 26, 2016 @ 9:37pm, 4 day(s) ago
    This time of year studying birds can be extremely challenging.Young birds as well as adults are going through successive molts. First thing I would consider before for unusual migrants is what is common and expected here. Just look at the Facebook websites and the photos of juvenile birds begging an ID are showing up.
    
    My two cents.
    
    Sent from my U.S. Cellular® Smartphone
    
    -------- Original message --------
    From: "Tristan McKee atmckee@... [CALBIRDS]"
    Date:08/26/2016 9:22 PM (GMT-07:00)
    To:
    Cc: calbirds@yahoogroups.com,nwcalbird@yahoogroups.com
    Subject: Re: [nwcalbird] Re: [CALBIRDS] Harpagus ID
    
     I am wondering why a well-known trait would not appear in the first 200 photos I looked at. Perhaps you are referring to the pale rusty coloration on the SIDES of the neck of ADULTS This is not like the dark rufous on the actual back of the neck of this immature bird, which is isolated from the pale areas of the underparts, rather than meeting them directly.
    
    Does the Merlin also have a rufous hindneck and rufous in the upperwing coverts
    
    I would not classify the eyes as particularly light or dark--though difficult to judge and extremely dependent on lighting, they appear to be pale brown, with a reddish tinge in some shots.
    
    I really don't mind at all if you keep trying, Rob. If you don't have time to address any of the traits I pointed out two emails back, which no-one else has come out and disputed yet, though, I have towonder why you are getting involved. Although--I have heard that the desire to discredit Tristan (who, by the way, claims no credit or skill at all) makes for quite a rewarding sport. :-)
    
    I'd say we should start by explaining the thick black goatee on both a Merlin and a Cooper's Hawk in the same vicinity. My previous email also still exists, and I would like to hear about its errors.
    
    TMcK
    
    On Fri, Aug 26, 2016 at 7:27 PM, Rob Fowler < migratoriusfwlr@... > wrote:
    Cooper's Hawk is well known to have a rusty hind neckor nape.
    
    Also, if these are the same birds then why does one have a pale eye and one a dark eye
    
    Rob Fowler
    
    On Friday, August 26, 2016, Tristan McKee < atmckee@... > wrote:
    I agree with Jim that a weird hybrid seems more likely, although I
    
    have racked my brain without coming up with a reasonable combination.
    
    One interesting trait that effectively eliminates the idea that the
    
    perched photos represent different individuals is the rusty hindneck,
    
    which doesn't seem typical of ANY of the species discussed thus far.
    
    Of course, it is difficult to ascertain what is typical in young
    
    Rufous-thighed,as photos on the web are few and far between.
    
    Tristan
    
    On 8/26/16, Tristan McKee < atmckee@... > wrote:
    
    > Thanks folks. I am certainly glad to bend to the general whims and
    
    > consensus of the birding community, and I am definitely not committed to
    
    > any particular ID for this bird. It does seem to be a good opportunity to
    
    > learn a thing or two about Merlins and Accipiters, which many California
    
    > birders have seemingly never studied carefully.
    
    >
    
    > Rufous-thighed Kite is in fact a long-distance migrant--see the recent
    
    > paper, easily found on the web.
    
    >
    
    > The "Sharp-shinned Hawk" from the first date has largely dark underwings.
    
    > That should give one pause. See:
    
    >
    
    > https://www.flickr.com/photos/ 101791769@N08/28599599934/in/d ateposted/
    
    >
    
    > and
    
    >
    
    > https://www.flickr.com/photos/ 101791769@N08/29148550035/in/
    
    > album-72157672700208176/
    
    >
    
    > No Sharp-shinned Hawk, let alone an adult male, shows any pattern close to
    
    > this.
    
    >
    
    > Sharp-shinned Hawks also have two thin dark bands and one thick dark band
    
    > beyond the undertail coverts, while this bird has two thick dark bands.
    
    >
    
    > Among many other things that are obviously wrong for that species is the
    
    > fact that only four outer primaries project noticeably in the bird in
    
    > question, while Sharp-shinned consistently shows six.
    
    >
    
    > The "Cooper's Hawk" photos show thick, widely-spaced dark bars on the sides
    
    > of the belly, not found in any plumage of any North American Accipiter. It
    
    > also has distinctly buff-barred primaries and tarsi far too thin for
    
    > Cooper's, among many things.
    
    >
    
    > https://www.flickr.com/photos/ 101791769@N08/28599592294/in/a lbum-72157672700208176/
    
    >
    
    > and
    
    >
    
    > https://www.flickr.com/photos/ 101791769@N08/29221930675/in/a lbum-72157672700208176/
    
    >
    
    > The "Merlin" was the size of a large Cooper's Hawk and shows a "goatee"
    
    > characteristic of Harpagus. Furthermore, its bill shape and rusty feather
    
    > in the upperwing coverts would be bizarre-looking on a Merlin. A
    
    > feather-by-feather analysis of the underparts and details of the facial
    
    > pattern make the idea that these are two different individuals, much less
    
    > two different species, rather far-fetched.
    
    >
    
    > https://www.flickr.com/photos/ 101791769@N08/28612068294/in/a lbum-72157672700208176/
    
    >
    
    > and
    
    >
    
    > https://www.flickr.com/photos/ 101791769@N08/29156249201/in/a lbum-72157672700208176/
    
    >
    
    > The bird gave a loud, descending, wailing call, unlike any falcon or
    
    > Accipiter.
    
    >
    
    > It is certainly understandable that folks are getting both falcon and
    
    > Accipiter impressions from the bird, if it is indeed a Harpagus, for a
    
    > combination of the two is what members of the genus look like,
    
    > superficially.
    
    >
    
    > Best,
    
    > Tristan
    
    >
    
    > On Fri, Aug 26, 2016 at 3:07 PM, James Pike < jimpike444@... > wrote:
    
    >
    
    >> Glad to be of service, Rob. Maybe it is a Single-Toothed Kite after all.
    
    >>
    
    >> Jim
    
    >> HB
    
    >>
    
    >> On Fri, Aug 26, 2016 at 1:59 PM, Rob Fowler migratoriusfwlr@...
    
    >> [CALBIRDS] < CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups. com > wrote:
    
    >>
    
    >>>
    
    >>>
    
    >>> Sterling, since you jumped in I might as well too. Biting. At least then
    
    >>> maybe people can stop contacting me and asking about these birds and what
    
    >>> I
    
    >>> think about them.
    
    >>>
    
    >>> Tristan's photos show a Merlin, a wet juvenile Cooper's Hawk, and an
    
    >>> adult Sharp-shinned. Jim Pike, that is why you are having a hard time:
    
    >>> because there are THREE different species involved from TWO families!
    
    >>>
    
    >>> Thanks,
    
    >>>
    
    >>> Rob Fowler
    
    >>> Humboldt County
    
    >>>
    
    >>>
    
    >>>
    
    >>
    
    >>
    
    >
    
    --
    Rob Fowler
    McKinleyville, CA
    
    www.fowleropebirding.com
  14. -back to top-
  15. Re: [nwcalbird] Re: [CALBIRDS] Harpagus ID LINK
    DATE: Aug 26, 2016 @ 9:22pm, 4 day(s) ago
    I am wondering why a well-known trait would not appear in the first 200 photos I looked at. Perhaps you are referring to the pale rusty coloration on the SIDES of the neck of ADULTS This is not like the dark rufous on the actual back of the neck of this immature bird, which is isolated from the pale areas of the underparts, rather than meeting them directly.
    
    Does the Merlin also have a rufous hindneck and rufous in the upperwing coverts
    
    I would not classify the eyes as particularly light or dark--though difficult to judge and extremely dependent on lighting, they appear to be pale brown, with a reddish tinge in some shots.
    
    I really don't mind at all if you keep trying, Rob. If you don't have time to address any of the traits I pointed out two emails back, which no-one else has come out and disputed yet, though, I have to  wonder why you are getting involved. Although--I have heard that the desire to discredit Tristan (who, by the way, claims no credit or skill at all) makes for quite a rewarding sport. :-)
    
    I'd say we should start by explaining the thick black goatee on both a Merlin and a Cooper's Hawk in the same vicinity. My previous email also still exists, and I would like to hear about its errors.
    
    TMcK
    
    On Fri, Aug 26, 2016 at 7:27 PM, Rob Fowler < migratoriusfwlr@... > wrote:
    Cooper's Hawk is well known to have a rusty hind neck or nape. 
    
    Also, if these are the same birds then why does one have a pale eye and one a dark eye
    
    Rob Fowler
    
    On Friday, August 26, 2016, Tristan McKee < atmckee@... > wrote:
    I agree with Jim that a weird hybrid seems more likely, although I
    
    have racked my brain without coming up with a reasonable combination.
    
    One interesting trait that effectively eliminates the idea that the
    
    perched photos represent different individuals is the rusty hindneck,
    
    which doesn't seem typical of ANY of the species discussed thus far.
    
    Of course, it is difficult to ascertain what is typical in young
    
    Rufous-thighed,as photos on the web are few and far between.
    
    Tristan
    
    On 8/26/16, Tristan McKee < atmckee@... > wrote:
    
    > Thanks folks. I am certainly glad to bend to the general whims and
    
    > consensus of the birding community, and I am definitely not committed to
    
    > any particular ID for this bird. It does seem to be a good opportunity to
    
    > learn a thing or two about Merlins and Accipiters, which many California
    
    > birders have seemingly never studied carefully.
    
    >
    
    > Rufous-thighed Kite is in fact a long-distance migrant--see the recent
    
    > paper, easily found on the web.
    
    >
    
    > The "Sharp-shinned Hawk" from the first date has largely dark underwings.
    
    > That should give one pause. See:
    
    >
    
    > https://www.flickr.com/photos/ 101791769@N08/28599599934/in/d ateposted/
    
    >
    
    > and
    
    >
    
    > https://www.flickr.com/photos/ 101791769@N08/29148550035/in/
    
    > album-72157672700208176/
    
    >
    
    > No Sharp-shinned Hawk, let alone an adult male, shows any pattern close to
    
    > this.
    
    >
    
    > Sharp-shinned Hawks also have two thin dark bands and one thick dark band
    
    > beyond the undertail coverts, while this bird has two thick dark bands.
    
    >
    
    > Among many other things that are obviously wrong for that species is the
    
    > fact that only four outer primaries project noticeably in the bird in
    
    > question, while Sharp-shinned consistently shows six.
    
    >
    
    > The "Cooper's Hawk" photos show thick, widely-spaced dark bars on the sides
    
    > of the belly, not found in any plumage of any North American Accipiter. It
    
    > also has distinctly buff-barred primaries and tarsi far too thin for
    
    > Cooper's, among many things.
    
    >
    
    > https://www.flickr.com/photos/ 101791769@N08/28599592294/in/a lbum-72157672700208176/
    
    >
    
    > and
    
    >
    
    > https://www.flickr.com/photos/ 101791769@N08/29221930675/in/a lbum-72157672700208176/
    
    >
    
    > The "Merlin" was the size of a large Cooper's Hawk and shows a "goatee"
    
    > characteristic of Harpagus. Furthermore, its bill shape and rusty feather
    
    > in the upperwing coverts would be bizarre-looking on a Merlin. A
    
    > feather-by-feather analysis of the underparts and details of the facial
    
    > pattern make the idea that these are two different individuals, much less
    
    > two different species, rather far-fetched.
    
    >
    
    > https://www.flickr.com/photos/ 101791769@N08/28612068294/in/a lbum-72157672700208176/
    
    >
    
    > and
    
    >
    
    > https://www.flickr.com/photos/ 101791769@N08/29156249201/in/a lbum-72157672700208176/
    
    >
    
    > The bird gave a loud, descending, wailing call, unlike any falcon or
    
    > Accipiter.
    
    >
    
    > It is certainly understandable that folks are getting both falcon and
    
    > Accipiter impressions from the bird, if it is indeed a Harpagus, for a
    
    > combination of the two is what members of the genus look like,
    
    > superficially.
    
    >
    
    > Best,
    
    > Tristan
    
    >
    
    > On Fri, Aug 26, 2016 at 3:07 PM, James Pike < jimpike444@... > wrote:
    
    >
    
    >> Glad to be of service, Rob. Maybe it is a Single-Toothed Kite after all.
    
    >>
    
    >> Jim
    
    >> HB
    
    >>
    
    >> On Fri, Aug 26, 2016 at 1:59 PM, Rob Fowler migratoriusfwlr@...
    
    >> [CALBIRDS] < CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups. com > wrote:
    
    >>
    
    >>>
    
    >>>
    
    >>> Sterling, since you jumped in I might as well too. Biting. At least then
    
    >>> maybe people can stop contacting me and asking about these birds and what
    
    >>> I
    
    >>> think about them.
    
    >>>
    
    >>> Tristan's photos show a Merlin, a wet juvenile Cooper's Hawk, and an
    
    >>> adult Sharp-shinned. Jim Pike, that is why you are having a hard time:
    
    >>> because there are THREE different species involved from TWO families!
    
    >>>
    
    >>> Thanks,
    
    >>>
    
    >>> Rob Fowler
    
    >>> Humboldt County
    
    >>>
    
    >>>
    
    >>>
    
    >>
    
    >>
    
    >
    
    --
    Rob Fowler
    McKinleyville, CA
    
    www.fowleropebirding.com
  16. -back to top-
  17. Re: [CALBIRDS] Global Shorebird Counting starts in a week LINK
    DATE: Aug 26, 2016 @ 5:46pm, 4 day(s) ago
    Sent from my iPad
    
    On Aug 26, 2016, at 2:19 AM, gyorgy.szimuly@... [CALBIRDS] < CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com > wrote:
  18. -back to top-
  19. Re: [nwcalbird] Re: [CALBIRDS] Harpagus ID LINK
    DATE: Aug 26, 2016 @ 3:07pm, 4 day(s) ago
    Glad to be of service, Rob. Maybe it is a Single-Toothed Kite after all.
    
    Jim
    HB
    
    On Fri, Aug 26, 2016 at 1:59 PM, Rob Fowler migratoriusfwlr@... [CALBIRDS] < CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com > wrote:
    
      Sterling, since you jumped in I might as well too. Biting. At least then maybe people can stop contacting me and asking about these birds and what I think about them.
    
    Tristan's photos show a Merlin, a wet juvenile Cooper's Hawk, and an adult Sharp-shinned. Jim Pike, that is why you are having a hard time: because there are THREE different species involved from TWO families!
    
    Thanks,
    
    Rob Fowler
    
    Humboldt County
  20. -back to top-
  21. Re: Harpagus ID LINK
    DATE: Aug 26, 2016 @ 3:12pm, 4 day(s) ago
    Glad to be of service, Rob. Maybe it is a Single-Toothed Kite after all.
    
    Jim
    HB
  22. -back to top-
  23. Re: [nwcalbird] Re: [CALBIRDS] Harpagus ID LINK
    DATE: Aug 26, 2016 @ 7:27pm, 4 day(s) ago
    Cooper's Hawk is well known to have a rusty hind neck or nape. 
    
    Also, if these are the same birds then why does one have a pale eye and one a dark eye
    
    Rob Fowler
    
    On Friday, August 26, 2016, Tristan McKee < atmckee@... > wrote:
    I agree with Jim that a weird hybrid seems more likely, although I
    
    have racked my brain without coming up with a reasonable combination.
    
    One interesting trait that effectively eliminates the idea that the
    
    perched photos represent different individuals is the rusty hindneck,
    
    which doesn't seem typical of ANY of the species discussed thus far.
    
    Of course, it is difficult to ascertain what is typical in young
    
    Rufous-thighed,as photos on the web are few and far between.
    
    Tristan
    
    On 8/26/16, Tristan McKee < atmckee@... > wrote:
    
    > Thanks folks. I am certainly glad to bend to the general whims and
    
    > consensus of the birding community, and I am definitely not committed to
    
    > any particular ID for this bird. It does seem to be a good opportunity to
    
    > learn a thing or two about Merlins and Accipiters, which many California
    
    > birders have seemingly never studied carefully.
    
    >
    
    > Rufous-thighed Kite is in fact a long-distance migrant--see the recent
    
    > paper, easily found on the web.
    
    >
    
    > The "Sharp-shinned Hawk" from the first date has largely dark underwings.
    
    > That should give one pause. See:
    
    >
    
    > https://www.flickr.com/photos/ 101791769@N08/28599599934/in/ dateposted/
    
    >
    
    > and
    
    >
    
    > https://www.flickr.com/photos/ 101791769@N08/29148550035/in/
    
    > album-72157672700208176/
    
    >
    
    > No Sharp-shinned Hawk, let alone an adult male, shows any pattern close to
    
    > this.
    
    >
    
    > Sharp-shinned Hawks also have two thin dark bands and one thick dark band
    
    > beyond the undertail coverts, while this bird has two thick dark bands.
    
    >
    
    > Among many other things that are obviously wrong for that species is the
    
    > fact that only four outer primaries project noticeably in the bird in
    
    > question, while Sharp-shinned consistently shows six.
    
    >
    
    > The "Cooper's Hawk" photos show thick, widely-spaced dark bars on the sides
    
    > of the belly, not found in any plumage of any North American Accipiter. It
    
    > also has distinctly buff-barred primaries and tarsi far too thin for
    
    > Cooper's, among many things.
    
    >
    
    > https://www.flickr.com/photos/ 101791769@N08/28599592294/in/ album-72157672700208176/
    
    >
    
    > and
    
    >
    
    > https://www.flickr.com/photos/ 101791769@N08/29221930675/in/ album-72157672700208176/
    
    >
    
    > The "Merlin" was the size of a large Cooper's Hawk and shows a "goatee"
    
    > characteristic of Harpagus. Furthermore, its bill shape and rusty feather
    
    > in the upperwing coverts would be bizarre-looking on a Merlin. A
    
    > feather-by-feather analysis of the underparts and details of the facial
    
    > pattern make the idea that these are two different individuals, much less
    
    > two different species, rather far-fetched.
    
    >
    
    > https://www.flickr.com/photos/ 101791769@N08/28612068294/in/ album-72157672700208176/
    
    >
    
    > and
    
    >
    
    > https://www.flickr.com/photos/ 101791769@N08/29156249201/in/ album-72157672700208176/
    
    >
    
    > The bird gave a loud, descending, wailing call, unlike any falcon or
    
    > Accipiter.
    
    >
    
    > It is certainly understandable that folks are getting both falcon and
    
    > Accipiter impressions from the bird, if it is indeed a Harpagus, for a
    
    > combination of the two is what members of the genus look like,
    
    > superficially.
    
    >
    
    > Best,
    
    > Tristan
    
    >
    
    > On Fri, Aug 26, 2016 at 3:07 PM, James Pike < jimpike444@... > wrote:
    
    >
    
    >> Glad to be of service, Rob. Maybe it is a Single-Toothed Kite after all.
    
    >>
    
    >> Jim
    
    >> HB
    
    >>
    
    >> On Fri, Aug 26, 2016 at 1:59 PM, Rob Fowler migratoriusfwlr@...
    
    >> [CALBIRDS] < CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com > wrote:
    
    >>
    
    >>>
    
    >>>
    
    >>> Sterling, since you jumped in I might as well too. Biting. At least then
    
    >>> maybe people can stop contacting me and asking about these birds and what
    
    >>> I
    
    >>> think about them.
    
    >>>
    
    >>> Tristan's photos show a Merlin, a wet juvenile Cooper's Hawk, and an
    
    >>> adult Sharp-shinned. Jim Pike, that is why you are having a hard time:
    
    >>> because there are THREE different species involved from TWO families!
    
    >>>
    
    >>> Thanks,
    
    >>>
    
    >>> Rob Fowler
    
    >>> Humboldt County
    
    >>>
    
    >>>
    
    >>>
    
    >>
    
    >>
    
    >
    
    --
    Rob Fowler
    McKinleyville, CA
    
    www.fowleropebirding.com
  24. -back to top-
  25. Re: [nwcalbird] Re: [CALBIRDS] Harpagus ID LINK
    DATE: Aug 26, 2016 @ 7:09pm, 4 day(s) ago
    I agree with Jim that a weird hybrid seems more likely, although I
    
    have racked my brain without coming up with a reasonable combination.
    
    One interesting trait that effectively eliminates the idea that the
    
    perched photos represent different individuals is the rusty hindneck,
    
    which doesn't seem typical of ANY of the species discussed thus far.
    
    Of course, it is difficult to ascertain what is typical in young
    
    Rufous-thighed,as photos on the web are few and far between.
    
    Tristan
    
    On 8/26/16, Tristan McKee < atmckee@... > wrote:
    
    > Thanks folks. I am certainly glad to bend to the general whims and
    
    > consensus of the birding community, and I am definitely not committed to
    
    > any particular ID for this bird. It does seem to be a good opportunity to
    
    > learn a thing or two about Merlins and Accipiters, which many California
    
    > birders have seemingly never studied carefully.
    
    >
    
    > Rufous-thighed Kite is in fact a long-distance migrant--see the recent
    
    > paper, easily found on the web.
    
    >
    
    > The "Sharp-shinned Hawk" from the first date has largely dark underwings.
    
    > That should give one pause. See:
    
    >
    
    > https://www.flickr.com/photos/101791769@N08/28599599934/in/dateposted/
    
    >
    
    > and
    
    >
    
    > https://www.flickr.com/photos/101791769@N08/29148550035/in/
    
    > album-72157672700208176/
    
    >
    
    > No Sharp-shinned Hawk, let alone an adult male, shows any pattern close to
    
    > this.
    
    >
    
    > Sharp-shinned Hawks also have two thin dark bands and one thick dark band
    
    > beyond the undertail coverts, while this bird has two thick dark bands.
    
    >
    
    > Among many other things that are obviously wrong for that species is the
    
    > fact that only four outer primaries project noticeably in the bird in
    
    > question, while Sharp-shinned consistently shows six.
    
    >
    
    > The "Cooper's Hawk" photos show thick, widely-spaced dark bars on the sides
    
    > of the belly, not found in any plumage of any North American Accipiter. It
    
    > also has distinctly buff-barred primaries and tarsi far too thin for
    
    > Cooper's, among many things.
    
    >
    
    > https://www.flickr.com/photos/101791769@N08/28599592294/in/album-72157672700208176/
    
    >
    
    > and
    
    >
    
    > https://www.flickr.com/photos/101791769@N08/29221930675/in/album-72157672700208176/
    
    >
    
    > The "Merlin" was the size of a large Cooper's Hawk and shows a "goatee"
    
    > characteristic of Harpagus. Furthermore, its bill shape and rusty feather
    
    > in the upperwing coverts would be bizarre-looking on a Merlin. A
    
    > feather-by-feather analysis of the underparts and details of the facial
    
    > pattern make the idea that these are two different individuals, much less
    
    > two different species, rather far-fetched.
    
    >
    
    > https://www.flickr.com/photos/101791769@N08/28612068294/in/album-72157672700208176/
    
    >
    
    > and
    
    >
    
    > https://www.flickr.com/photos/101791769@N08/29156249201/in/album-72157672700208176/
    
    >
    
    > The bird gave a loud, descending, wailing call, unlike any falcon or
    
    > Accipiter.
    
    >
    
    > It is certainly understandable that folks are getting both falcon and
    
    > Accipiter impressions from the bird, if it is indeed a Harpagus, for a
    
    > combination of the two is what members of the genus look like,
    
    > superficially.
    
    >
    
    > Best,
    
    > Tristan
    
    >
    
    > On Fri, Aug 26, 2016 at 3:07 PM, James Pike < jimpike444@... > wrote:
    
    >
    
    >> Glad to be of service, Rob. Maybe it is a Single-Toothed Kite after all.
    
    >>
    
    >> Jim
    
    >> HB
    
    >>
    
    >> On Fri, Aug 26, 2016 at 1:59 PM, Rob Fowler migratoriusfwlr@...
    
    >> [CALBIRDS] < CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com > wrote:
    
    >>
    
    >>>
    
    >>>
    
    >>> Sterling, since you jumped in I might as well too. Biting. At least then
    
    >>> maybe people can stop contacting me and asking about these birds and what
    
    >>> I
    
    >>> think about them.
    
    >>>
    
    >>> Tristan's photos show a Merlin, a wet juvenile Cooper's Hawk, and an
    
    >>> adult Sharp-shinned. Jim Pike, that is why you are having a hard time:
    
    >>> because there are THREE different species involved from TWO families!
    
    >>>
    
    >>> Thanks,
    
    >>>
    
    >>> Rob Fowler
    
    >>> Humboldt County
    
    >>>
    
    >>>
    
    >>>
    
    >>
    
    >>
    
    > 
  26. -back to top-
  27. Re: [nwcalbird] Re: [CALBIRDS] Harpagus ID LINK
    DATE: Aug 26, 2016 @ 4:59pm, 4 day(s) ago
    I don't know what the hell it is, other than interesting. The eye is dark, the head appears gray without a capped effect, the scaps lack white mottling/spotting, fine streaking is present on the leg feathers and lower flanks, the head looks blocky, the tail looks long, the streaks on the upper breast create a bibbed effect with blobs of white below.................what does all of this add up to I have no idea. But I suspect hybrid is a more logical (parsimonious) explanation than Harpagus sp. But then I'm not remotely an expert with hawks.
    
    Jim 
    HB    
    
    On Fri, Aug 26, 2016 at 4:40 PM, Tristan McKee < atmckee@... > wrote:
    Thanks folks. I am certainly glad to bend to the general whims and consensus of the birding community, and I am definitely not committed to any particular ID for this bird. It does seem to be a good opportunity to learn a thing or two about Merlins and Accipiters, which many California birders have seemingly never studied carefully.
    
    Rufous-thighed Kite is in fact a long-distance migrant--see the recent paper, easily found on the web.
    
    The "Sharp-shinned Hawk" from the first date has largely dark underwings. That should give one pause. See:
    
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/ 101791769@N08/28599599934/in/d ateposted/
    
    and
    
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/ 101791769@N08/29148550035/in/a lbum-72157672700208176/
    
    No Sharp-shinned Hawk, let alone an adult male, shows any pattern close to this.
    
    Sharp-shinned Hawks also have two thin dark bands and one thick dark band beyond the undertail coverts, while this bird has two thick dark bands.
    
    Among many other things that are obviously wrong for that species is the fact that only four outer primaries project noticeably in the bird in question, while Sharp-shinned consistently shows six.
    
    The "Cooper's Hawk" photos show thick, widely-spaced dark bars on the sides of the belly, not found in any plumage of any North American Accipiter. It also has distinctly buff-barred primaries and tarsi far too thin for Cooper's, among many things.
    
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/ 101791769@N08/28599592294/in/ album-72157672700208176/
    
    and
    
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/ 101791769@N08/29221930675/in/ album-72157672700208176/
    
    The "Merlin" was the size of a large Cooper's Hawk and shows a "goatee" characteristic of Harpagus. Furthermore, its bill shape and rusty feather in the upperwing coverts would be bizarre-looking on a Merlin. A feather-by-feather analysis of the underparts and details of the facial pattern make the idea that these are two different individuals, much less two different species, rather far-fetched.
    
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/ 101791769@N08/28612068294/in/ album-72157672700208176/
    
    and
    
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/ 101791769@N08/29156249201/in/ album-72157672700208176/
    
    The bird gave a loud, descending, wailing call, unlike any falcon or Accipiter.
    
    It is certainly understandable that folks are getting both falcon and Accipiter impressions from the bird, if it is indeed a Harpagus, for a combination of the two is what members of the genus look like, superficially.
    
    Best,
    Tristan
    
    On Fri, Aug 26, 2016 at 3:07 PM, James Pike < jimpike444@... > wrote:
    Glad to be of service, Rob. Maybe it is a Single-Toothed Kite after all.
    
    Jim
    HB
    
    On Fri, Aug 26, 2016 at 1:59 PM, Rob Fowler migratoriusfwlr@... [CALBIRDS] < CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups. com > wrote:
    
      Sterling, since you jumped in I might as well too. Biting. At least then maybe people can stop contacting me and asking about these birds and what I think about them.
    
    Tristan's photos show a Merlin, a wet juvenile Cooper's Hawk, and an adult Sharp-shinned. Jim Pike, that is why you are having a hard time: because there are THREE different species involved from TWO families!
    
    Thanks,
    
    Rob Fowler
    
    Humboldt County
  28. -back to top-
  29. Global Shorebird Counting starts in a week LINK
    DATE: Aug 26, 2016 @ 2:19am, 5 day(s) ago
    Dear Friends,
    
    The 3rd World Shorebirds Day with it's popular Global Shorebird Counting (GSC) is upon us. In just a week birdwatchers around the world go to their preferred location and count shorebirds. I ask all of you to support and appreciate this special day byjoining the GSC. Simply register your Californian location and go counting.
    
    For more details please visit our page:
    https://worldshorebirdsday.wordpress.com/globalshorebirdcounting/
    
    You can also win one of the small gifts we have through our partners. Please find more about it in this blog post:
    https://worldshorebirdsday.wordpress.com/2016/08/18/raffle-prizes-for-global-shorebird-counting-participants/
    
    I'm looking forward to hearing from you soon.
    Best, Szimi
    _______________
    Gyorgy Szimuly Milton Keynes, UK
    Coordinator of World Shorebirds Day Events
    https://worldshorebirdsday.wordpress.com/
  30. -back to top-
  31. New able to update Avisys with Clements updates LINK
    DATE: Aug 20, 2016 @ 7:22am, 11 day(s) ago
    Folks,
    While I submit all my birding to ebird now I continue to rely on Avisys for my personal records. Since the founder of this software became gravely ill and no longer able to support the program many of us have been in a funk. Thanks to Kent who developed the method described herein we can continue to use Avisys. Again this is a compliment only not an alternative to using ebird. I did the update in about 2 hours, no sweat.
    Cheers,
    Mike Judd Brevard, NC
    Kent Fiala Aug 17 (3 days ago)
    
    to carolinabirds
    
    AviSys users: I have
    created a taxonomy update for AviSys, incorporating the
    just-released Clements 2016 changes. You can find a link to the
    documentation for it at http://avisys.faintlake.com/ .
    
    Before I make the update generally available for download, I am
    looking for a few brave souls to go first and be my beta testers.
    (The update does work for me, but I'm the only one to have run it so
    far.) If you would like to be a tester, please email me (off-list
    please) and let me know, and I will send you the update file. All I
    need is that you promise to apply the update promptly, and report
    back to me how the update went, and how usable the documentation is.
    
    Actually, before you email me, go ahead and follow the instructions
    for setting up your test data set. If you are not discouraged after
    that, then you can email me. If you are discouraged, email me and
    tell me what discouraged you.
    
    If you have done an update before, the steps should all be familiar
    to you.
  32. -back to top-
  33. Re: [nwcalbird] Re: [CALBIRDS] Harpagus ID LINK
    DATE: Aug 26, 2016 @ 4:40pm, 4 day(s) ago
    Thanks folks. I am certainly glad to bend to the general whims and consensus of the birding community, and I am definitely not committed to any particular ID for this bird. It does seem to be a good opportunity to learn a thing or two about Merlins and Accipiters, which many California birders have seemingly never studied carefully.
    
    Rufous-thighed Kite is in fact a long-distance migrant--see the recent paper, easily found on the web.
    
    The "Sharp-shinned Hawk" from the first date has largely dark underwings. That should give one pause. See:
    
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/ 101791769@N08/28599599934/in/ dateposted/
    
    and
    
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/ 101791769@N08/29148550035/in/ album-72157672700208176/
    
    No Sharp-shinned Hawk, let alone an adult male, shows any pattern close to this.
    
    Sharp-shinned Hawks also have two thin dark bands and one thick dark band beyond the undertail coverts, while this bird has two thick dark bands.
    
    Among many other things that are obviously wrong for that species is the fact that only four outer primaries project noticeably in the bird in question, while Sharp-shinned consistently shows six.
    
    The "Cooper's Hawk" photos show thick, widely-spaced dark bars on the sides of the belly, not found in any plumage of any North American Accipiter. It also has distinctly buff-barred primaries and tarsi far too thin for Cooper's, among many things.
    
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/101791769@N08/28599592294/in/album-72157672700208176/
    
    and
    
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/101791769@N08/29221930675/in/album-72157672700208176/
    
    The "Merlin" was the size of a large Cooper's Hawk and shows a "goatee" characteristic of Harpagus. Furthermore, its bill shape and rusty feather in the upperwing coverts would be bizarre-looking on a Merlin. A feather-by-feather analysis of the underparts and details of the facial pattern make the idea that these are two different individuals, much less two different species, rather far-fetched.
    
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/101791769@N08/28612068294/in/album-72157672700208176/
    
    and
    
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/101791769@N08/29156249201/in/album-72157672700208176/
    
    The bird gave a loud, descending, wailing call, unlike any falcon or Accipiter.
    
    It is certainly understandable that folks are getting both falcon and Accipiter impressions from the bird, if it is indeed a Harpagus, for a combination of the two is what members of the genus look like, superficially.
    
    Best,
    Tristan
    
    On Fri, Aug 26, 2016 at 3:07 PM, James Pike < jimpike444@... > wrote:
    Glad to be of service, Rob. Maybe it is a Single-Toothed Kite after all.
    
    Jim
    HB
    
    On Fri, Aug 26, 2016 at 1:59 PM, Rob Fowler migratoriusfwlr@... [CALBIRDS] < CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups. com > wrote:
    
      Sterling, since you jumped in I might as well too. Biting. At least then maybe people can stop contacting me and asking about these birds and what I think about them.
    
    Tristan's photos show a Merlin, a wet juvenile Cooper's Hawk, and an adult Sharp-shinned. Jim Pike, that is why you are having a hard time: because there are THREE different species involved from TWO families!
    
    Thanks,
    
    Rob Fowler
    
    Humboldt County
  34. -back to top-
  35. Re: [nwcalbird] Re: [CALBIRDS] Harpagus ID LINK
    DATE: Aug 26, 2016 @ 1:59pm, 4 day(s) ago
    Sterling, since you jumped in I might as well too. Biting. At least then maybe people can stop contacting me and asking about these birds and what I think about them.
    
    Tristan's photos show a Merlin, a wet juvenile Cooper's Hawk, and an adult Sharp-shinned. Jim Pike, that is why you are having a hard time: because there are THREE different species involved from TWO families!
    
    Thanks,
    
    Rob Fowler
    
    Humboldt County
  36. -back to top-
  37. Re: [CALBIRDS] Arcata kite photos LINK
    DATE: Aug 26, 2016 @ 9:26am, 4 day(s) ago
    Hi Tristan,
    
    I can see why you're intrigued by this bird and I don't have a clue as to its identity. I've never seen a Rufous-thighed or Double-toothed Kite (although I thought I saw a single-toothed one in Arkansas once; sorry, couldn't help myself). One thing I've noticed in online photos of both of these Harpagus species is that they share a relatively small, domed head with a face dominated by a large eye. I get different impressions of this bird from your photos, with some reminding me of a Merlin and others reminding me of a Cooper's Hawk. However, in all of them, the shape of the head is broad with a relatively flat crown and a relatively small eye, and thus not reminiscent to me of Harpagus. Have you considered hybrid origin for this strange bird, perhaps involving Red-shouldered Hawk
    
    Jim Pike
    Huntington Beach   
    
    On Thu, Aug 25, 2016 at 7:34 PM, Tristan McKee atmckee@... [CALBIRDS] < CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com > wrote:
    
      I took somewhat better pictures of the Arcata raptor on Parton Road north of town today:
    
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/ 101791769@N08/albums/ 72157672700208176
    
    Tristan McKee
  38. -back to top-
  39. Re: [CALBIRDS] Harpagus ID LINK
    DATE: Aug 26, 2016 @ 11:31am, 4 day(s) ago
    Tristan's link to pics: https://www.flickr.com/photos/101791769@N08/sets/72157672700208176
    
    Also repeated his first post, below.
    
    Just being a do-bee,
    
    Sylvia Wright
    
    Nevada County, CA
    
    From: "John Sterling jsterling@... [CALBIRDS]"
    To: "Tristan McKee"
    Cc: calbirds@yahoogroups.com, nwcalbird@yahoogroups.com
    Sent: Friday, August 26, 2016 9:36:52 AM
    Subject: Re: [CALBIRDS] Harpagus ID
    
    I'm in Paraguay now where rufous thighed kites are found. My Paraguayan colleagues tell me that it is not a migratory species.
    
    I haven't seen any photos yet so I'm wondering if any are clear enough to rule out the more likely coopers or red-sh hawk
    
    John Sterling. 26 Palm Ave
    Woodland, CA 95696
    Www.sterlingbirds.com
    
    530 908-3836
    
    Sent from my iPhone
    
    On Aug 26, 2016, at 1:59 AM, Tristan McKee atmckee@... [CALBIRDS] < CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com > wrote:
    
     I'm seeing some photos now in which Rufous-thighed Kites look very warmly colored on the breast. Given that most of my shots show a largely dark underwing and some show chestnut in the wing coverts, and also noting the thickness of the malar stripe, this species, Double-toothed's closest relative, needs to be considered carefully. It is a long-distance migrant from eastern South America.
    
    I'd welcome any help with identification within this genus.
    
    Thank you,
    Tristan McKee
    
    Maybe not a bird of wild origin but truly a spectacular thing to see in a Humboldt neighborhood setting, a flashy medium-sized raptor has been inhabiting western Arcata for the past few days. I take it to be a Double-toothed Kite in transitional plumage. I had to work to figure this one out because I am rusty. :-) This morning, I had very good views of the stunning bird on a pole in the pasture west of 17th street, a half mile west of Alliance/K street. It eventually flew to Iverson and gave a loud, descending, wailing squeal, just like many Double-toothed Kite examples on xeno-canto.
    
    I have also seen it soaring over my house on P Street in the evening and in the morning on Zehnder. Its structure is unlike any North American raptor, though this genus is sometimes likened to the Accipiters (however, Harpagus have longer wings and shorter tails). It flaps with surprising rapidity and glides on slightly bowed wings, bringing to my mind a large Burrowing Owl when it was flying away. The head is mostly gray and there is some red coming into the breast, but there is much brown streaking and barring retained on the underparts. The tail is boldly patterned with thick bands of black and white. It has large reddish eyes. The underwing varies in impression in different conditions and angles, but it seems to be whitish through the center of the wing, with a chestnut leading edge and heavily barred flight feathers. The reddish coming into the breast makes it simple to eliminate the only other Harpagus, the South American Rufous-thighed Kite.
    
    I had obtained some poor video stills of the bird previously, but this time, when it obliged to sit still for good 10 minutes, I had forgotten my memory card. But I'm sure one of the fine photographers up here will be able to post photos sometime today.
    
    Tristan McKee
    Arcata, CA
  40. -back to top-
  41. Re: [CALBIRDS] Harpagus ID LINK
    DATE: Aug 26, 2016 @ 9:36am, 4 day(s) ago
    I'm in Paraguay now where rufous thighed kites are found. My Paraguayan colleagues tell me that it is not a migratory species.
    
    I haven't seen any photos yet so I'm wondering if any are clear enough to rule out the more likely coopers or red-sh hawk
    
    John Sterling. 26 Palm Ave
    Woodland, CA 95696
    Www.sterlingbirds.com
    530 908-3836
    
    Sent from my iPhone
    
    On Aug 26, 2016, at 1:59 AM, Tristan McKee atmckee@... [CALBIRDS] < CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com > wrote:
    
     I'm seeing some photos now in which Rufous-thighed Kites look very warmly colored on the breast. Given that most of my shots show a largely dark underwing and some show chestnut in the wing coverts, and also noting the thickness of the malar stripe, this species, Double-toothed's closest relative, needs to be considered carefully. It is a long-distance migrant from eastern South America.
    
    I'd welcome any help with identification within this genus.
    
    Thank you,
    Tristan McKee
  42. -back to top-
  43. Harpagus ID LINK
    DATE: Aug 25, 2016 @ 10:59pm, 5 day(s) ago
    I'm seeing some photos now in which Rufous-thighed Kites look very warmly colored on the breast. Given that most of my shots show a largely dark underwing and some show chestnut in the wing coverts, and also noting the thickness of the malar stripe, this species, Double-toothed's closest relative, needs to be considered carefully. It is a long-distance migrant from eastern South America.
    
    I'd welcome any help with identification within this genus.
    
    Thank you,
    Tristan McKee 
  44. -back to top-
  45. Arcata kite photos LINK
    DATE: Aug 25, 2016 @ 7:34pm, 5 day(s) ago
    I took somewhat better pictures of the Arcata raptor on Parton Road north of town today:
    
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/101791769@N08/albums/72157672700208176
    
    Tristan McKee
  46. -back to top-
  47. Immature Harpagus in Arcata LINK
    DATE: Aug 25, 2016 @ 9:13am, 5 day(s) ago
    Maybe not a bird of wild origin but truly a spectacular thing to see in a Humboldt neighborhood setting, a flashy medium-sized raptor has been inhabiting western Arcata for the past few days. I take it to be a Double-toothed Kite in transitional plumage. I had to work to figure this one out because I am rusty. :-) This morning, I had very good views of the stunning bird on a pole in the pasture west of 17th street, a half mile west of Alliance/K street. It eventually flew to Iverson and gave a loud, descending, wailing squeal, just like many Double-toothed Kite examples on xeno-canto.
    
    I have also seen it soaring over my house on P Street in the evening and in the morning on Zehnder. Its structure is unlike any North American raptor, though this genus is sometimes likened to the Accipiters (however, Harpagus have longer wings and shorter tails). It flaps with surprising rapidity and glides on slightly bowed wings, bringing to my mind a large Burrowing Owl when it was flying away. The head is mostly gray and there is some red coming into the breast, but there is much brown streaking and barring retained on the underparts. The tail is boldly patterned with thick bands of black and white. It has large reddish eyes. The underwing varies in impression in different conditions and angles, but it seems to be whitish through the center of the wing, with a chestnut leading edge and heavily barred flight feathers. The reddish coming into the breast makes it simple to eliminate the only other Harpagus, the South American Rufous-thighed Kite.
    
    I had obtained some poor video stills of the bird previously, but this time, when it obliged to sit still for  good 10 minutes, I had forgotten my memory card. But I'm sure one of the fine photographers up here will be able to post photos sometime today.
    
    Tristan McKee
    Arcata, CA
  48. -back to top-
  49. Passing of Richard Ternullo LINK
    DATE: Aug 24, 2016 @ 11:30pm, 6 day(s) ago
    Folks   Chris Hartzell just passed on the news that legendary Skipper Richard Ternullo of Monterey Bay Seabirds/Whalewatch passed away from his battle with cancer today. I am in shock, I was hoping to see him this Saturday at the dock, share a few laughs, talk about the birds and whales and have a good time. I will miss him. He was a good guy, straight shooter and one of those people who had done a lot, worked on many projects, influenced tons of people and could very well have gone around thinking he was better than others. But no, Richard was Richard, humble and downplaying all he had done. Many of you will know him as a the most knowledgeable skipper on California pelagic boats, a guy who knew the birds, knew the whales and the ocean. He had been taking out birders for years, usually on the Pt. Sur Clipper. See Chris’s email below for a few more details on Richard’s work.    I learned a lot from Richard, and will truly miss him. The wheelhouse without Skipper Richard Ternullo will just not be the same. We will miss you Richard. Alvaro
    
    Alvaro Jaramillo alvaro@... www.alvarosadventures.com
     From: mbbirds@... [mailto:mbbirds@...] On Behalf Of Chris Hartzell
    Sent: Wednesday, August 24, 2016 10:37 PM
    To: Mbbirds
    Subject: [MBBIRDS] Passing of Richard Ternullo
    
     I am saddened to report that Richard Ternullo passed away tonight after losing his battle with cancer.
    
    Richard was the co-owner of Monterey Bay Whale Watch, the skipper and coordinator for Monterey Seabirds and Shearwater Journeys for many many years, Having a degree in biology, he led naturalist trips on Monterey B ay for over 33 years and authored and co-authored many publications including such titles as, “From Wind to Whales: Trophic Links in a Coastal Upwelling System,” “Killer Whales of California and Western Mexico: A Catalog of Photo-Identified Individuals,” and “Occurrence, Distribution, and Predation of Killer Whales (Orcinus orca) in Monterey Bay.” Richard was a huge advocate for Monterey Bay and all its wildlife, including specifically birds, whales, and sharks and w as by far the best seabird skipper, having his own rarity records attributed to him. He was President and Vice President of the American Cetacean Society Monterey Bay as well as National Board member of the American Cetacean Society. For those who knew him, he was an advocate with an attitude.
    
    I have memories of him when I was a young animal lover aboard his seabirding trips and today as a fellow advocate with an attitude. I will remember how he knew when to be political and calm, but I will never forget how he wasn’t afraid to use his voice to get a point across, whether to a misbehaving passenger on the boat or city leader in a council meeting.
    
    It is a tremendous loss to Monterey Bay and he will be greatly missed.
    
    In the near future, services will be scheduled and more information can be found by contacting Monterey Bay Whale Watch at (831) 375-4658 or emailing them at whaletrips@...
    
    
    
    -Chris Hartzell Monterey
    
    PhotoStrokes.net
    ~ Environmental Conservation ~ Educational Presentations ~ Unique Art ~
    ~ Photography Lessons ~ Wildlife Photo Tours ~ International Travel ~
    
    --
    For Monterey Rare Bird alerts call 831-250-4550
    ---
    You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "mbbirds" group.
    To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to mbbirds+unsubscribe@... .
    To post to this group, send email to mbbirds@... .
    To view this discussion on the web visit https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/mbbirds/129256169.1648228.1472103447555%40mail.yahoo.com .
    For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout .
  50. -back to top-


Fatbirder's Top 500 Birding Websites



-revision history-
v1.30 - 01/05/16 - Revamped cloud logic, optimized database queries, linked to eBird rarities.
v1.23 - 12/08/11 - Added direct link to CBRC records.
v1.22 - 12/03/11 - Corrected GMT offsets on dates. Added last 5 posts at top.
v1.21 - 11/24/11 - Added direct link to range map for NA birds.
v1.2  - 11/23/11 - Greatly improved graphing technology - separates month vs. year by posts. Added species auto-complete functionality.
v1.14 - 11/22/11 - Added cloud bubble for common thread topics.
v1.13 - 11/22/11 - Added integrated photos where available.
v1.12 - 11/22/11 - Added multiple input boxes for additional refinement, negative search criteria (eg. -keyword).
v1.11 - 11/22/11 - Added banding code, species look-up. Also direct link to recent eBird observations.
 v1.1 - 11/22/11 - Added 'date' functionality. Shows top 'month/year' combinations for a query. Restrict results to that 'month/year'.
 v1.0 - 11/21/11 - Initial version coded. Currently archiving 'lacobirds' and 'calbirds'.