Message Board Search Tool
Banding Code Translator | Recent Rare Bird Sightings
©2018 Christopher Taylor (Kiwifoto.com)
Help Support!

** NOTICE **
I am letting the LACOBIRDS.com and CALBIRDS.com domains expire. You will need to reach this site by going to https://kiwifoto.com/lacobirds!


calbirds        search ebird rarities [plot]
filter rba/cbc

  28 result(s) found...Displaying messages 1 through 15, sorted by date descending.
  next page

 Month/Year Breakdown (Top 15):

 May, 2015 - 2 e-mail(s)...
 Jun, 2015 - 2 e-mail(s)...
 Aug, 2015 - 2 e-mail(s)...
 Sep, 2015 - 2 e-mail(s)...
 Aug, 2018 - 2 e-mail(s)...
 Sep, 2005 - 2 e-mail(s)...
 Jul, 2014 - 2 e-mail(s)...
 Jul, 2002 - 1 e-mail(s)...
 Sep, 2016 - 1 e-mail(s)...
 Aug, 2004 - 1 e-mail(s)...
 Jul, 2018 - 1 e-mail(s)...
 Aug, 2005 - 1 e-mail(s)...
 Sep, 2018 - 1 e-mail(s)...
 Sep, 2006 - 1 e-mail(s)...
 Oct, 2018 - 1 e-mail(s)...



   Wedge-rumped Storm-Petrel
Wedge-rumped Storm-Petrel
Oceanodroma tethys


   Wedge-rumped Storm-Petrel (Oceanodroma tethys) - WRSP (recent eBird sightings, view CBRC records, range map
)

  1. RED-FOOTED BOOBY, MANX SHEARS, + more LINK
    DATE: Oct 2, 2018 @ 4:44pm, 44 day(s) ago
    Howdy, CALbirders,
    
    This is a brief report of three pelagic trips, September 28, 29, and 30 operated by Shearwater Journeys, all departing from Fishermans Wharf, Monterey. Highlights included:
    
    SEP 30: RED-FOOTED BOOBY a first record for Santa Cruz County made a speedy fly-by the stern of our vessel (images obtained); 760 SABINES GULLS in several flocks, both Monterey and Santa Cruz Counties; TUFTED PUFFIN in Monterey County. The flocks of Sabines Gulls were astounding and lovely to watch. One flock of over Pomarine Jaegers was nice.
    
    SEP 29: All birds in Monterey County: MANX SHEARWATER sitting on the sea, excellent views for all on board; PEREGRINE FALCON chasing an ELEGANT TERN (first time Ive ever seen that); 2000 ELEGANT TERNS off Point Pinos along with thousands of seabirds and hundreds of Rissos, Pacific white-sided, and Northern right whale dolphins.
    
    SEP 28: SIX SPECIES OF SHEARWATERS, including: MANX and SHORT-TAILED; 33 SABINES GULLS.
    
    On all three trips we were able to find the last few remaining PIGEON GUILLEMOTS; all three species of jaegers; Red and Red-necked phalaropes; excellent views of BULLERS SHEARWATERS; good numbers of Rhinoceros Auklets and Common Murres. Marine mammals have been sensational, with 30 to 60 humpback whales per day. There is a LOT of food in Monterey Bay, mainly boiling anchovies. These trips were operated in conjunction with the Monterey Bay Birding Festival.
    
    UPCOMING TRIPS with spaces available:
    
    OCT 6 MTY with Scott & Linda Terrill, Nick Levendosky, Jim Holmes, Alex Rinkert, Debi Shearwater.
    OCT 7 HMB with Steve Hampton, Christian Schwarz, Jim Holmes, Debi Shearwater.
    OCT 13 MTY with Alex Rinkert, Nick Levendosky, Scott & Linda Terrill, Debi Shearwater.
    OCT 21 MTY with Alex Rinkert, Nick Levendosky, Jim Holmes, Debi Shearwater.
    
    All of the October trips will endeavor to head to Santa Cruz County!
    
    Reservations: email me: debi@... .
    
    Rare seabirds that have been found during the month of October include: Wedge-tailed Shearwater (twice), Great-winged Petrel, Streaked Shearwater, White-chinned Petrel, Parkinsons Petrel, Short-tailed Albatross, Wedge-rumped Storm-Petrel, Swallow-tailed Gull, and Thick-billed Murre. Most of these records were found on Shearwater Journeys trips.
    
    Shearwater Journeys has twice set a world record of finding eight species of shearwaters in one day on October trips!
    
    October is a great time to get out there!
    
    Seabirding for Science,
    Debi Shearwater
    
    DEBRA SHEARWATER
    Shearwater Journeys, Inc.
    PO Box 190
    Hollister, CA 95024
    831.637.8527
    debi@...
    www.shearwaterjourneys.com
    www.shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com
    
    Celebrating 43 Years of Seabirding with Shearwater Journeys
  2. -back to top-
  3. CBRC review and request for documentation LINK
    DATE: Sep 20, 2018 @ 8:55am, 56 day(s) ago
    California birders, The California Bird Records Committee (CBRC) will begin reviewing the following records in mid October. If you have any documentation to submit for these records, please
    do so as soon as possible. Feel free to forward this request to local listservs as appropriate. Thank you. Tom Thomas A. Benson Secretary, California Bird Records Committee 2018-031 Fulvous Whistling-Duck 9 Apr-26 Jun 2018Goleta, SBA (documentation from 8 observers) 2018-075 Fulvous Whistling-Duck 11-20 Jul 2018 Ballona Freshwater Marsh, LA(documentation from 11 observers) 2018-074 Violet-crowned Hummingbird 7 Jul-1 Aug 2018Kern River Preserve, KER (documentation from 9 observers) 2018-079 Wedge-rumped Storm-Petrel15 Jul 2018 near San Nicolas Island, VEN (documentation from 2 observers) 2018-032 Gray Hawk 12 Apr-24 Jun 2018 Palo Verde Ecol. Res., RIV (documentation from 3 observers) What kind of documentation should one submit to the CBRC Following are some guidelines for submitting media and written descriptions that will be useful for helping the
    CBRC evaluate records and archive documentation. Documentation may be submitted directly to the secretary via email ( secretary@... ) , or by using the online
    submission form ( http://www.californiabirds.org/report_sighting.html ). Media: This includes photos, audio recordings, and video. Photographs are usually the most useful documentation for evaluating records. If you have reasonably good (=identifiable)
    photos, please submit them. If possible, please crop the photos before submission so that the bird fills most of the frame. Also, please send originals whenever possible, and not screenshots or back-of-camera photos. How many photos should you submit That
    really depends on the record. If it is a long-staying rarity that is easily identifiable and seen by dozens of people, then a few photos (1-3 per person) are sufficient. If it is a mega-rarity that is difficult to identify and only seen by a one or few people,
    then send as many photos as possible that show the bird at different angles, postures, lighting, etc. Sometimes it is also useful to submit audio and/or video recordings of the bird, as some birds are more easily identified by their vocalizations. If relatively
    short, most audio recordings are small enough to be submitted via email; please submit those along with a brief note indicating the date and location of the recording. Large audio files and video files can be submitted by using a file sharing service; please
    contact the secretary if you need to submit a file that is too large for email. Written descriptions: Some written details should always be provided even the best photos should be accompanied by the name of the observer, the date, and the location,
    at a minimum. Sometimes a photo cant be obtained or vocalizations cant be recorded. In some cases, behaviors might be noted in the field that arent preserved well by photos. In these cases, it is helpful to submit a written description of the bird. Ideally,
    this description should be written as soon after observing the bird as possible; it is often helpful to make written notes in the field, or even dictate notes into the voice recorder on your smartphone while observing the bird, from which you can later generate
    a written description. The most important aspect of a written description is that you report only what you observed, and not a general description of the bird from a field guide. At a minimum, your description should include the date and location of the observation,
    and a description of the bird (size and structure, plumage, vocalizations, behavior). A brief discussion of how the bird was identified, and how similar species were eliminated is also helpful. Other useful information you might report includes optics used,
    distance from bird, lighting or weather conditions, length of time viewed, and other observers present. 
  4. -back to top-
  5. Aug 29 pelagic trip out of Ventura with Island Packers LINK
    DATE: Aug 11, 2018 @ 4:08pm, 3 month(s) ago
    I am pleased to announce that Island Packers is offering a
    pelagic trip out of Ventura on Wednesday, August 29 at 7 am. Island Packers has
    graciously freed up a boat and we plan to run a 12-hour trip out to the edge that
    had all the Cook's Petrels and storm-petrels in July. Our July 15 trip had a Tristram's Storm-Petrel, Wedge-rumped Storm-Petrel, several Townsend's Storm-Petrels, 100+ Cook's Petrels, 2 Nazca Boobies, and a variety of other pelagic species including 1000s of shearwaters. There has been a
    persistent temperature break and favorable oceanic conditions in that
    area so it is likely there are still birds out there. There have been a lot of interesting birds offshore of southern California this summer including a number of Nazca Boobies, 2 Red-footed Boobies around San Diego this week, Craveri's Murrelets, Townsend's Storm-Petrels and more. One of our leaders was just on a fishing boat out
    of San Diego and said there are lots of Cook's Petrels and Leach's Storm-Petrels offshore, and he also had Black-footed and Laysan Albatrosses.
    The plan is to go
    directly to the spot where we had numbers of great birds in July (approximately 3 hours from Ventura) and spend our time working that edge for Cook's Petrels, storm-petrels, and whatever else might be out there. Last year we had numbers of Craveri's Murrelets
    in that same area and we have seen Townsend's Storm-Petrels there multiple times. Red-billed Tropicbird is also a possibility. To maximize our time in that productive area, we will not be stopping for common birds on the way out. We have a plan of attack and believe we have a chance of
    finding something good. Are we going to refind the Tristram's or
    Wedge-rumped I don't know, but we will be in the same area we found
    those birds and will spend hours there searching.
    
    If you are interested and able to make the trip, go to https://reserve.islandpackers.com/tab=special_trips
    and select the Wed Aug 29 pelagic bird trip, which is the last of the
    three special trips listed. It will be a 12-hour trip at a cost of $195 per adult. If you prefer to not use the web-based reservation
    system, you can call Island Packers during their business hours at (805)
    642-1393. We will need to fill this trip
    fast to make it a "go" so please sign-up quickly if you are interested. The trip will be on an ultra-fast catamaran that features a
    spacious and comfortable cabin, galley, and excellent viewing from both the
    upper and lower decks. A full contingent of outstanding seabird leaders will be
    present to make sure we see all that is out there. The Captain and crew know how to run birding
    trips and are enthusiastic and helpful.
    In addition, we work hard to creep up on birds and get them in the right
    light...photographers will not be disappointed!
    
    Hope to see you at sea
    
    Dave Pereksta
    Ventura
  6. -back to top-
  7. August 25 pelagic trip to Tanner and Cortez Banks LINK
    DATE: Aug 2, 2018 @ 2:16pm, 4 month(s) ago
    Birders,
    
    I have organized a pelagic trip to the Cortez and Tanner Banks at the end of this month. The basic details are: departure from Dana Point aboard the R/V Sea Explorer, leaving at 1 AM and returning at 9 PM on Saturday, August 25 (20 hours); there are NO bunks or full galley on board, but possibly enough room to sleep on the floor or benches inside (plenty of room outside). The per person cost is $200, and there are only TWO spaces remaining.
    
    This should be an excellent opportunity to see species like Black-footed Albatross, Leach's Storm-Petrel, Red-billed Tropicbird, Craveri's Murrelet, Arctic Tern, South Polar Skua, and Long-tailed Jaeger. It is also a good opportunity to look for rare species such as Cook's and Hawaiian Petrels, Townsend's Storm-Petrel, Least Storm-Petrel, and Guadalupe Murrelet. On July 15 a trip from Ventura to nearby waters recorded nearly 100 Cook's Petrels, Tristram's Storm-Petrel, Wedge-rumped Storm-Petrel, two Nazca Boobies, Long-tailed Jaeger, South Polar Skua, Sabine's Gull, and Black, Ashy, and Leach's Storm-Petrels. Additionally, t hree Townsend's Storm-Petrels were photographed on a trip out of San Diego on July 29. <
    /div>
    
    If you are interested in going or have any questions, please email me back (off list) and I will send you additional details and/or payment information.
    
    Tom Benson
    San Bernardino, CA
    thomasabenson AT aol.com
  8. -back to top-
  9. Ventura pelagic trip report - 15 July 2018; multiple megas! LINK
    DATE: Jul 20, 2018 @ 7:32am, 4 month(s) ago
    I am finally getting a trip report out from Sunday's pelagic trip out of Ventura with Island Packers. We had some exceptional birds and photos of several storm-petrels have revealed that we had better birds than we knew. I will not go in to exhaustive detail of every segment of the trip, but will hit the highlights.
    
    We left Ventura on the Island Adventure and headed across the channel to Anacapa Island. Although there has not been any boobies on Anacapa yet in 2018, we had to look anyway and were stunned to find a Nazca Booby sitting on top of the arch! The bird sat there and preened in front of us for 20 minutes before we moved on. This is just the second Ventura County record (of a live bird) and one of less than 20 for California and North America. The day can't get any better than that...right Well maybe it did. We continued along the south shore of Anacapa Island where we found an American Oystercatcher in a place where we have seen them on past trips. Another California rarity and still before 9 am. You are welcome Logan.
    
    We then headed south of the islands to the areas we have been exploring on recent July trips. There were impressive numbers of Sooty and Pink-footed Shearwaters along the majority of the route and while riding a steep contour line to the south, the first scream of "Cook's Petrel!!" rang out for the day. Another was screamed out soon thereafter, but these first two were elusive and not seen by many. This is when the trip leader starts sweating bullets, but not to worry as we hit a steady stream of Cook's Petrels eventually getting some close passes and even small groups sitting on the water. Our ride south was littered with petrels and shearwaters. We also found a few late Scripps's Murrelets that Captain Jimmy expertly crept up on and allowed everyone on board to get great looks.
    
    After just crossing back into Ventura County waters, we found a large flock of storm-petrels sitting on the water (100+) that we crept up on. As we approached the flock a storm-petrel passed closely across the bow that I yelled out so the people in the bow could get on it. I shot a few photos since it was close and the verdict from the bow at the time was a dark-rumped Leach's Storm-Petrel. I will come back to this bird later. The flock flushed as we approached and the birds dispersed quickly. While the flock was primarily Ashy and Black Storm-Petrels, a small bird with a big white rump was seen briefly by only a few people before it disappeared. Some captured this bird in their photos of the flock and later analysis and consultation with experts proved it to be a Wedge-rumped Storm-Petrel! This is only the 14th record for the state, but most of the boat including myself did not see it. Thankfully some managed to get photos. While going through my photos of the flock, I found an apparent Fork-tailed Storm-Petrel that also eluded detection.
    
    As we continued on we had more storm-petrels including a few Townsend's, and a steady stream of shearwaters and the occasional Cook's Petrel. Several Long-tailed Jaegers and a South Polar Skua were also highlights. We eventually turned east and headed towards Santa Barbara Island to check the status of Brown Boobies at this little visited island. After running across several more Cook's Petrels that were farther east than we have ever seen in the region, we were several miles off the island when someone on the boat shouted "booby!" While I expected to see our first Brown Booby of the day, I was shocked to see a large white booby flying straight for the boat...our second Nazca Booby of the day!! Second record for Santa Barbara County and a very happy cadre of SBCo listers. The island did not disappoint as we had 50 Brown Boobies at Sutil Rock with several pairs exhibiting courting behavior. Hard to believe this species was rare in the region until just a few years ago. Upon leaving the island we started our slog back to Ventura against the swell and although the birds dropped off late in the day, we did have stellar looks at several Long-tailed Jaegers. Other birds seen throughout the day included Northern Fulmar, Black-vented Shearwater, Leach's Storm-Petrel, Cassin's Auklet, Common Murre, Rhinoceros Auklet, Pigeon Guillemot, Sabine's Gull, Red Phalarope, and Red-necked Phalarope.
    
    After getting home and not looking at any of my photos until Monday, I found my photos of the storm-petrel that crossed our bow and nearly had a heart attack. The camera captures what the eye can't see in an instant, and the photos revealed a stocky storm-petrel with a deeply forked tail, pale rump and back, bright carpal bars, and a contrastingly dark head. The field marks suggested this bird was likely a Markham's or a Tristram's Storm-Petrel. Upon consulting with a few experts who are familiar with these species, the responses came back overwhelmingly that the bird in question was a Tristram's Storm-Petrel! If accepted, this would be the first record of a free-flying bird in North American waters. We saw one on a 2007 July trip that was rejected by the CBRC, and two have been captured in mist nets on the Farallon Islands in recent years. I already posted a photo on Facebook and will cross post it to several lists. Our team will work up a submission to the CBRC.
    
    This was an amazing trip and we could not do it without the unwavering support of Island Packers and their staff. Joel Barrett and his passion for birds makes these trips happen on their end and we could not do it without him. Captain Jimmy McWaters handled the boat and got us on birds like the seasoned expert he is. Thanks also go out to Leanne Kleinsmith and Sam the whale man for their support to passengers throughout the day. Our leaders/spotters did a spectacular job finding birds and getting people on them all day so special thanks to Todd McGrath, Adam Searcy, Peter Gaede, Hugh Ranson, Wes Fritz, and Bernardo Alps.
    
    Our next scheduled trip is Oct 6, 2018 although we are discussing a chase trip out to the area where we had Cook's Petrels and storm-petrels. If we can get something scheduled I will announce it out to the listserves. Stay tuned.
    
    Dave Pereksta
    Ventura, CA
  10. -back to top-
  11. A Smorgasbord for Marine Life LINK
    DATE: Sep 7, 2016 @ 7:55pm, 2 year(s) ago
    Howdy, CALBirders,
    
    There is an incredible amount and variety of food offshore at the moment  including pelagic red crabs (in Monterey), squid, anchovies, and krill. Every marine animal from shearwaters to whales to great white sharks  seems to be feeding or looking for food.
    Shearwater Journeys latest trip report for September 3, Its a Smorgasbord Out There! can be found at this link:
    http://shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com/2016/09/monterey-bay-pelagic-trip-september-3.html
    
    Although our September 3 Monterey trip made it out just fine, we were seriously weathered out on September 4, Half Moon Bay due to near gale force winds and square seas.
    
    The weather surprised us yet again, today with some gusty winds from the south while a west swell continues. Yet another high pressure system is moving in place over the northern waters. For now, I cant trust the marine forecast, but if the seabirds turn up anywhere near what folks in Arizona have seen  Wedge-tailed Shearwater, Least and Wedge-rumped Storm-Petrels  well, count me in!
    
    Monterey Bay looks good for the next several days. Our trip program is listed below:
    
    MONTEREY BAY:
    SEP 8 with Mary Gustafson, Scott Terrill, Christian Schwarz, Debi Shearwater
    SEP 9 with Mary Gustafson, Rick Fournier, Debi Shearwater
    SEP 10 ALBACORE;with Nick Levendosky, Scott & Linda Terrill, Mary Gustafson, Alex Rinkert, Debi Shearwater (SOLD OUT)
    SEP 11 with Scott & Linda Terrill, Mary Gustafson, David Wimpfheimer, Debi Shearwater
    SEP 14 with Scott Terrill, Rob Fowler, Dave Pereksta, Debi Shearwater
    SEP 15 with Nick Levendosky, Hannah Nevins, Jim Holmes, Dave Pereksta, Debi Shearwater
    SEP 23 with Nick Levendosky, Christian Schwarz, Clay Kempf, Debi Shearwater
    SEP 24 with Alex Rinkert, Scott & Linda Terrill, Dena Spatz, Tim Miller, Abe Borker, Debi Shearwater
    SEP 25 with Nick Levendosky, Abe Borker, Tim Miller, Debi Shearwater
    OCT 1 with Nick Levendosky, Christian Schwarz, Jim Holmes, Alex Rinkert, Debi Shearwater
    OCT 8 with Alex Rinkert, Tim Miller, Christian Schwarz, Debi Shearwater
    OCT 16 with Nick Levendosky, Alex Rinkert, Debi Shearwater
    
    SEP 23, 24, 25 trips are in conjunction with the Monterey Bay Birding Festival. However, one does not need to be attending the festival to join any of those trips.
    
    HALF MOON BAY:
    SEP 16 with Jim Holmes, Steve Hampton, Abe Borker, Debi Shearwater
    SEP 18 with Jim Holmes, Alex Rinkert, Steve Tucker, Scott & Linda Terrill, Debi Shearwater
    OCT 2 with Steve Tucker, Jim Holmes, Steve Hampton, Debi Shearwater
    OCT 9 with Nick Levendosky, Abe Borker, Tim Miller, Steve Hampton, Debi Shearwater
    
    RESERVATIONS: Email Debi Shearwater: debi@...
    
    Whatever happens, there is a lot of mixing at the moment!
    Living the Salt Life,
    Debi Shearwater
    DEBRA SHEARWATER
    Shearwater Journeys, Inc.
    PO Box 190
    Hollister, CA 95024
    831.637.8527
    debi@...
    www.shearwaterjourneys.com
    www.shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com
    
    Celebrating 41 Years of Seabirding with Shearwater Journeys
  12. -back to top-
  13. Repositioning cruise trip report LINK
    DATE: Sep 20, 2015 @ 8:50pm, 3 year(s) ago
    Birders
    We had an interesting repositioning cruise aboard the Ruby Princess from Vancouver to LA this past week. Our route had us positioned about 50 miles off south-central WA at dawn the first day, and we nearly made it to the CA border by nightfall. The next day we started off Mendocino County in California, and ended in southern San Luis Obispo county. Sea/weather conditions were quite windy with rain squalls over WA and OR, but calmer and clearing off CA. Overall there were LOTS of Long-tailed Jaegers, Arctic Terns, and Red Phalaropes out there; I've tried to put up a good cross section of images of these in the checklists below (let me know if I messed up any of the jaegers, there were some weird looking Long-taileds out there!). Tubenose numbers were slim overall, but very good off WA and southern OR, and nearly dead off CA. 
    
    Highlights were a Brown Booby off WA, several Guadalupe Murrelets off CA, and two Wedge-rumped Storm-Petrels off Morro Bay. We had two pterodroma sp. on the trip, both on the first day. One was likely a Hawaiian Petrel and one was a dark bird that could have been something better than a Murphy's, but the sighting was too brief; picked up just before crossing the bow.
    
    I spent some time today fleshing out these eBird checklists with photos. Here are the links to the trip lists for each hour:
    
    15 September
    
    Washington
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S25054412
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S25054403
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S25054397
    
    Oregon
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S25054395
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S25054385
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S25054380
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S25054375
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S25054373
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S25054371
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S25054369
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S25054365
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S25054359
    
    16 September
    
    California
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S25068380
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S25068379
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S25068373
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S25068363
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S25068360
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S25068346
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S25068345
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S25068329
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S25068327
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S25068323
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S25068321
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S25067795
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S25067783
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S25068319
    
    -- ===========Brian L. SullivaneBird Project Leader www.ebird.orgPhoto EditorBirds of North America Onlinehttp://bna.birds.cornell.edu/BNA-------------------------------
    
    
  14. -back to top-
  15. Wedge-rumped Storm-Petrels off Morro Bay LINK
    DATE: Sep 17, 2015 @ 6:27am, 3 year(s) ago
    Hi Calbirders
    Yesterday a few of us birding from the Ruby Princess cruise ship were lucky enough to find two Wedge-rumped Storm-Petrels among a scattered, mixed group of Storm-Petrels roughly 30 miles WSW of Morro Bay. The eBird checklist with a few photos of these birds is here:
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S25067795
    
    We're still sitting in port, so I'm just getting this out there to alert birders. I'll add more details and photos to this report when I'm not paying a dollar a minute for the internet!
    
    Thanks
    
    Brian
    -- ===========Brian L. SullivaneBird Project Leader www.ebird.orgPhoto EditorBirds of North America Onlinehttp://bna.birds.cornell.edu/BNA-------------------------------
    
    
  16. -back to top-
  17. Re: [CALBIRDS] warm water - ENSO - and bird displacements. LINK
    DATE: Aug 27, 2015 @ 6:52pm, 3 year(s) ago
    To add to the northbound Peruvian Booby in Costa Rica, there are photographs of a Peruvian Booby taken on July 12
    at Penon de San Jose in Panama.
    
    Ron Thorn
    
    ---Original Message-----
    From: 'Alvaro Jaramillo' chucao@... [CALBIRDS] <CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
    To: 'Daniel Baxter' <baxbarnowl@...>; CALBIRDS <CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com>
    Sent: Wed, Aug 26, 2015 10:59 am
    Subject: [CALBIRDS] warm water - ENSO - and bird displacements.
    
    Folks,
    I am becoming obsessed with El Niño, obviously. It is maybe a semantic point, but maybe not. This year the effect of the El Niño will be difficult to pinpoint because of the warm water event we have been experiencing for over a year in the state. Our warm water event is part of what people have called “the blob” and may even be related to the Ridiculously Resilient Ridge, which has created clear weather rather than rain for us. But this is not the El Niño, the effects of which in the bird fauna are not overwhelming thus far. Keep in mind that the El Niño’s direct effects are in South America, and sometimes there is a corresponding warm water area on our side of the equator when we have a real big Niño. However, this year that warm water was already here. So it will be difficult to figure out which event is having the effect, or both.
    I just returned from Galapagos, and the El Niño is certainly asserting an effect, but it is not huge yet. It looks like seabird productivity is down, ranging from Blue-footed and Nazca boobies to Waved Albatross. Numbers of Wedge-rumped Storm-Petrels and Galapagos Shearwaters seemed pretty normal while I was there. The big difference was seeing the thousands of phalaropes, something I am not accustomed to from my previous trips, yet none have been this late in August so that likely is the explanation. The massive rains have not arrived yet on the Galapagos, and my guess is that this will begin soon, perhaps by November. But there has not been a complete seabird crash yet it seems, although reproduction is definitely low.
    Vagrant Blue-footed Boobies way south of the range in South America continue. The latest goodie northbound I heard about was a Peruvian Booby in Costa Rica. Those are definitely El Niño related. The local Brown Booby invasion, tropicbirds, northbound murrelets etc. are almost certainly related to the warm water blob off Mexico than El Niño, but as things progress this could all change.
    Good birding,
    Alvaro
    Alvaro Jaramillo
    alvaro@...
    www.alvarosadventures.com
    
    From: CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Daniel Baxter baxbarnowl@... [CALBIRDS]
    Sent: Wednesday, August 26, 2015 8:05 AM
    To: CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com
    Subject: [CALBIRDS] Re: August 25 pelagic from Ventura
    
    You're right about the El Niño! I saw (and photographed) my first red billed tropicbird about three miles north of Santa Barbara Island on last Saturday's IslandPackers trip. A dozen brown boobies also flew directly over the boat.
    
    Dan Baxter
    
    Sent from my iPad
    
    
  18. -back to top-
  19. warm water - ENSO - and bird displacements. LINK
    DATE: Aug 26, 2015 @ 10:58am, 3 year(s) ago
    Folks,
        I am becoming obsessed with El Niño, obviously. It is maybe a semantic point, but maybe not. This year the effect of the El Niño will be difficult to pinpoint because of the warm water event we have been experiencing for over a year in the state. Our warm water event is part of what people have called “the blob” and may even be related to the Ridiculously Resilient Ridge, which has created clear weather rather than rain for us. But this is not the El Niño, the effects of which in the bird fauna are not overwhelming thus far. Keep in mind that the El Niño’s direct effects are in South America, and sometimes there is a corresponding warm water area on our side of the equator when we have a real big Niño. However, this year that warm water was already here. So it will be difficult to figure out which event is having the effect, or both.
              I just returned from Galapagos, and the El Niño is certainly asserting an effect, but it is not huge yet. It looks like seabird productivity is down, ranging from Blue-footed and Nazca boobies to Waved Albatross. Numbers of Wedge-rumped Storm-Petrels and Galapagos Shearwaters seemed pretty normal while I was there. The big difference was seeing the thousands of phalaropes, something I am not accustomed to from my previous trips, yet none have been this late in August so that likely is the explanation. The massive rains have not arrived yet on the Galapagos, and my guess is that this will begin soon, perhaps by November. But there has not been a complete seabird crash yet it seems, although reproduction is definitely low.
         Vagrant Blue-footed Boobies way south of the range in South America continue. The latest goodie northbound I heard about was a Peruvian Booby in Costa Rica. Those are definitely El Niño related. The local Brown Booby invasion, tropicbirds, northbound murrelets etc. are almost certainly related to the warm water blob off Mexico than El Niño, but as things progress this could all change.
    Good birding,
    Alvaro
    Alvaro Jaramillo
    alvaro@...
    www.alvarosadventures.com
    
    From: CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Daniel Baxter baxbarnowl@... [CALBIRDS]Sent: Wednesday, August 26, 2015 8:05 AMTo: CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.comSubject: [CALBIRDS] Re: August 25 pelagic from Ventura
    
    You're right about the El Niño! I saw (and photographed) my first red billed tropicbird about three miles north of Santa Barbara Island on last Saturday's IslandPackers trip. A dozen brown boobies also flew directly over the boat.Dan BaxterSent from my iPad
    
    
  20. -back to top-
  21. Half Moon Bay July pelagics LINK
    DATE: Jun 30, 2015 @ 9:18pm, 3 year(s) ago
    Hi folks,
    The water is heating up offshore, and hopefully the birding will also. El Niño is gathering force off the Galapagos, and we are already seeing displacements of birds from there. Who knows, but the Kelp Gull we saw here may be part of this event Two Wedge-rumped Storm-Petrels were caught on the Farallon Islands earlier this spring, and San Diego birders are finding some great early records and a northbound and early movement of Craveri’s Murrelets, Least SP, Buller’s Shearwaters, and even Magnificent Frigatebirds. You never know what is going to be out there, could be a bird of a lifetime like the Salvin’s Albatross we found in July last year on our boat, or maybe it will be a birdy but rarity free day But it is shaping up to be an unusual year, and these are the first two chances of getting out there in Central California to see what is going on. July 19 and July 26 we have trips going out, both still have spaces left. You can’t expect the unexpected, but southern hemisphere seabirds like the albatross head north in June – July, so it is a good time to be watching for a stray “weirdo.”
    Let me know if you are interested, or pay directly on the site with PayPal. I am super excited to get out this season, I do not think this will be a “run of the mill” year.
    http://alvarosadventures.com/boat-trips/pelagics/
    Great birding to you all.
    Alvaro
    Alvaro Jaramillo
    alvaro@...
    www.alvarosadventures.com
    
  22. -back to top-
  23. Upcoming Ventura Pelagic and Thoughts on Summer Season LINK
    DATE: Jun 17, 2015 @ 5:34pm, 3 year(s) ago
    Birders,
    
    So far the pelagic birding off CA this year has been very good suggesting that the summer season will be an interesting one. Spring trips from cruise ships reported better than usual numbers of Murphy's Petrels as well as good numbers of the now expected Hawaiian Petrel. Research boats added a good number of Cook's near the Davidson Seamount and other locations. A Mendo County trip added a Murphy's close to shore, and a recent San Diego trip had exceptional numbers of Buller's Shearwaters (good anytime of year this far south, but early as well). In addition that trip produced large numbers of Craveri's Murrelets (irruptive and exceptionally early), plus a Wilson's Storm-petrel (good this far south). Also a Wedge-rumped Storm-petrel visited the Ashy colony on the Farallones. And of course the two day wonder Nazca Booby on Anacapa was another highlight.
    
    Add to that the predictions of a building El Nino, and it is shaping up to be a very interesting year. The early arrival of Buller's was something we saw in the 98 El Nino event, and there were at least a couple of Wedge-tailed Shearwater reports (One well photographed in Monterey and seen multiple times) that year as well. CA's first accepted Bulwer's Petrel also showed in July of 1998 in Monterey Bay.
    
    I don't think it is possible to compare El Nino years directly, as the timing and impact of each event is unique and can create localized conditions. What I would expect is 1) early arrival of fall migrants and species that disperse north from Mexico (We should see Guadalupe and Craveri's Murrelets earlier and in better numbers). Also higher numbers of Black-vented Shearwaters heading north and staying north, as well as good dispersal of Black and Least Storm-Petrels earlier and further north than is typical.
    
    If the nutrient poor warm Pacific ocean water pushes closer to shore as often happens in these warm water years, then there is the possibility to see offshore species to closer to shore (I remember a Buller's Shearwater flying over the dunes at Bodega Bay). In 2006 we ha=d goos numbers of Cook's a a rare fall Murphy's. The absolute number of birds may be down, as Sooty Shearwaters and other colder water birds push further north for food, but the chance of a rarity increases, and those birds may be easier to pick out.
    
    I am not a fan of predictions, as our understanding of the events that drive seabird dispersal is still low, but I believe this is a good year to do some exploring and I believe it has the chance to see numbers of some irruptive species like murrelets as well as the potential for some rarities. The one prediction I can make is that your chance of seeing something exciting an a CA pelagic this year is infinitely greater if you go on a CA pelagic this year.
    
    It so happens that the good folks at Island Packers have a series of trips to choose from this summer. The trips will have great set of leaders onboard (Coordinated by Big Dave Pereksta) and will include the usual array of So Cal leaders (with an occasional guest-leader from Texas putting in an appearance on at least the July trip).
    
    Once late-July hits the full schedule of Shearwater Journeys trips gets underway, and Debi has a variety of trips to a great many locations on the calendar and I suspect Debi will work her usual magic and find some goodies this year www.shearwaterjourneys.com will have the full list. Texas will also be represented on as many of those trips as I can get to.
    
    Here is the info on the Island Packers Trips. I think the 12 hour July trip will be interesting, hopefully I will see you there, or on another trip this pelagic season.
    
    Island Packer has a great set of fast comfortable Catamarans and a fantastic crew. It's always a pleasure to head to sea with them.
    
    The schedule and pricing is as follows:Channel Islands and Beyond: Santa Barbara Channel, Interisland gaps, and deep waters south of the islandsJuly 12th(Sunday) 12 hrs 7 am-7 pm$195 per adultPrevious year highlights include: Blue-footed Booby, Scripps’s and Craveri’s Murrelet, South Polar Skua, Common Tern, Leach’s, Ashy, and Black Storm-Petrels, Sooty, Pink-footed, and Black-vented Shearwaters, Cassin’s Auklet, and Red-necked Phalaropes. Manx Shearwater has also been sighted the past few years in mid-July.Santa Barbara Island Special: Anacapa Island, Pilgrim Bank, Santa Barbara Island, Osborn Bank, Santa Cruz BasinAugust 25th(Tue) 10 hrs 8 am- 6 pm$125 per adult (This trip will also be dropping off campers at Santa Barbara Island)Previous year highlights include: Red-billed Tropicbird, Brown Booby, Scripps’s and Craveri’s Murrelets; Black-vented, Sooty, and Pink-footed Shearwaters; Cassin’s Auklet; Red-necked Phalarope; and Black Storm-Petrel.Santa Barbara Channel inside and out: Fall MigrationOctober 10th(Sat) 10 hrs 8 am-6 pm$170 per adultPrevious year highlights include: Blue-footed and Brown Booby; American Oystercatcher; Craveri’s Murrelet; Pomarine, Parasitic, and Long-tailed Jaegers; Cassin’s and Rhinoceros Auklets; Red and Red-necked Phalarope; Pink-footed and Black-vented Shearwaters, Common/Arctic Terns and Common Murre. Other possibilities include Buller’s and Flesh-footed Shearwaters, Wilson’s Storm Petrel, Red-billed Tropicbird, and Sabine’s Gull.These trips will be on ultra-fast catamarans that feature spacious and comfortable cabins, galleys, and excellent viewing from both the upper and lower decks. A full contingent of outstanding seabird leaders will be present to make sure we see all that is out there. The Captains and crews know how to run birding trips and are enthusiastic and helpful. In addition, we work hard to creep up on birds and get them in the right light...photographers will not be disappointed!
    Trips can be booked over the phone by calling (805) 642-1393 or online at www.IslandPackers.com by clicking the Reserve Trip tab/Reserve a trip, Select the Special Trips tab, and select your desired departure.
    
    Todd McGrath
    SKUA@...
    The Woodlands Tx (part of the time)
    a United Airlines Flight (most of time)
    On boat off CA (not nearly enough)
    
    
  24. -back to top-
  25. Predicting New Seabirds LINK
    DATE: May 15, 2015 @ 1:36pm, 4 year(s) ago
    Hi, CalBirders,
    It is interesting to look back at seabirds that were predicted to show up in the Pacific Region. The American Birding Association hosted a series of articles in which expert birders in seven regions tried to predict the next new birds for the ABA region. I authored the article, published in December 1999, that covered the Pacific Region from British Columbia to the California-Mexico border. Each of the regional authors assembled a ten-person panel who then cast votes for the next, new species. My team included: Steve Howell, Peter Pyle, Sophie Webb, Steve Rottenborn, Stephen Bailey, Kimball Garrett, Guy McCaskie, Bill Tweit, and Kimball Garrett.
    
    Here's a link to an updated analysis of this series: http://www.aba.org/birding/v42n3p34.pdf
    
    The number one contender by a wide margin of 40 votes, was Juan Fernandez Petrel. This species was followed by Kermadec Petrel, Solander's Petrel, Black-winged Petrel, Southern Giant-Petrel, and Townsend's Shearwater. Only Solander's Petrel and Townsend's Shearwater have been found out of the six predicted species.
    
    Seabirds receiving honorable mention included: Parkinson's Petrel, Cape Petrel, Waved Albatross, Gray-backed Tern, Gray-headed Albatross, Tahiti Petrel, Christmas Shearwater, Southern Skua, Markham's Storm-Petrel, Chilean Skua, and Gray Petrel. Of these, only Parkinson's Petrel has been found.
    
    Seabirds not even on the "prediction horizon" which have been found include Ringed Storm-Petrel and Tristram's Storm-Petrel! Tristram's Storm-Petrel along with Wedge-rumped Storm-Petrel were both recorded this spring from the Farallon Islands!
    
    I think it is a good idea to attempt to predict these things simply because it puts these seabirds on everyone's radar. And, perhaps, encourages folks to dust off the seabird books and have another look.
    
    My choice for top contender is Waved Albatross simply because I know of two different unsubstantiated, but good records.
    
    If predicting seabirds is fraught with uncertainty, predicting El Nino and its effects could be even more uncertain. To be sure there is warm water "out there." But, there's also cool water! No one is talking about that, from what I can see. With regular to strong northwest winds, sea surface temperatures dropped to below average this spring near the Farallon Islands where nesting is underway. This is good news for those seabirds. Blue-footed Booby, Northern Gannet and up to 12 Brown Boobies frequented the islands this spring.
    
    Credible reports that I've received from the Galapagos say that there is no real indication of El Nino happening at this time.
    
    But, we all know that there is warm water out there, and lots of it. Frankly, it is a soupy mess. And, I think that's really great, possibly the best conditions we could hope for — a mess.
    
    See you, "out there" in the mess!
    Shearwaters Forever,
    Debi
    
    DEBRA SHEARWATER
    Shearwater Journeys, Inc.
    PO Box 190
    Hollister, CA 95024
    831.637.8527
    debi@...
    www.shearwaterjourneys.com
    www.shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com
    
    Celebrating 40 Years of Seabirding with Shearwater Journeys
    
    
  26. -back to top-
  27. Fw: [CALBIRDS] May 17 pelagic birding trip out of Santa Barbara on the Condor Express LINK
    DATE: May 2, 2015 @ 10:31am, 4 year(s) ago
    Last call for the pelagic trip out of Santa Barbara on May 17 (details below). We need a bump in sign-ups to make this trip go so please make a reservation in the next few days if you want to join us. Research and re-positioning cruises have been seeing Murphy's, Cook's, and Hawaiian Petrels over the last few weeks, and a Wedge-rumped Storm-Petrel was caught on the Farallones recently. There are some exceptional birds off the coast right now and this trip gives us a shot to find something exciting.
    
    Hope to see you aboard.
    
    Dave Pereksta
    Ventura
    
    ---------------------------------------------------------------
    
    Hi all
    
    If you want to get out to offshore waters beyond the reach of most day trips and have a chance to see a number of outstanding pelagic birds and
    marine mammals, the Condor Express has a 12-hour pelagic trip scheduled for May 17 (Sunday) out of Santa Barbara Harbor. Trips at this time of year have had outstanding
    results over the last six years. We are also scheduling this to follow the May 16 pelagic trip out of San Diego for those from out-of-state (or in state) who may want to schedule multiple trips. It would be a squeeze to do both, but intrepid pelagic birders have done crazier things!
    
    This trip gives us the opportunity to get far offshore of southern California and spend a lot of time in places that one-day trips can only
    search briefly, if they can get there at all. If sea conditions permit,
    we are planning to get out to places like Arguello Canyon, the Rodriguez Seamount,
    and several banks and
    trenches that have produced a spectacular variety of marine birds and
    mammals. If sea conditions prevent us from getting to some of these
    locations, we will get as far offshore as we can to places where we have found great birds. On past trips we have found Murphy's Petrel, Cook's Petrel, Laysan Albatross, Black-footed Albatross, Leach's and Ashy Storm-Petrels, Red-necked and Red
    Phalaropes (sometimes in the thousands), Scripps's Murrelet, Sabine's Gull, Arctic Tern, and
    numbers of the expected shearwaters, jaegers, and alcids.
    
    Deepwater trips at this time of year have the potential to produce several rare species. We saw numbers of Cook's Petrels at this time of year in 2009 and 2010. In addition, we will make a special effort to locate Murphy's Petrels, which are not present every spring, but can be found in small numbers over deep water. Other rarities that could be encountered include Hawaiian Petrel, Parakeet Auklet, and Horned and Tufted Puffins. Recent trips on research cruises and repositioning trips this spring have seen Cook's and Murphy's Petrels and numbers of Laysan Albatrosses. This may be a good year for Cook's Petrels again. There is always a chance that we could come across something outrageous
    we are not expecting, but we never know until we get out there, which
    makes these trips very exciting.
    
    Our vessel is the ultra-fast Condor Express. This catamaran features a spacious and comfortable cabin that seats 55 people, full galley (the food is great!), and excellent viewing from both the upper and lower decks. A full contingent of outstanding seabird leaders will be present to make sure we see all that is out there. Captain Dave and crew know how
    to run birding trips and are enthusiastic and helpful. We work hard to get as close as we can to the birds and mammals, while getting them in favorable light...photographers will not be disappointed!
    
    We never know what we will find out there, but there is always something that leaves lasting memories with all who have gone aboard.
    
    The cost for the trip is $195. We depart Santa Barbara promptly at 7:00
    AM, so please arrive by 6:30 AM to facilitate check-in and loading.
    
    Call the Sealanding at 805-564-6753 to reserve your spot. I look forward to seeing you on-board in May.
    
    Cheers
    
    David Pereksta
    Ventura
    
    
  28. -back to top-
  29. No Salvin's, but warm water birds heading north!! Half Moon Bay pelagic. LINK
    DATE: Jul 31, 2014, 4 year(s) ago
    Hello folks,
    
    Unfortunately we could not re-locate the Salvin’s Albatross yesterday although we tried hard in good waters with plenty of Black-footed Albatrosses. We did however find that warm water species are arriving early and in numbers, with Black Storm Petrel the most common storm petrel out there, giving great views both in San Francisco and San Mateo counties. We encountered Wilson’s Storm-Petrel three times, again in both counties. There were various “Mexican Murrelet” stops, some with birds flying away from the boat and unidentifiable, to amazing close up and personal looks. Craveri’s Murrelets were seen in both San Francisco and San Mateo counties, including a group in San Mateo that was not only easy to see, but calling! They had this neat trill, that Curtis Marantz likened to a Bohemian Waxwing. I only wished I had my mike there to have recorded it. It was like nothing I have heard at sea, so ringing and musical, and loud for a small bird! Photos here:
    
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/alvarojaramillo/14775712436/in/photostream/ ID fanatics might note that this Craveri’s actually has a white chin, or at least my photo appears to show that. They are supposed to have a black chin, perhaps the photo is misleading, or this feature is not 100% reliable.
    
    Scripps’s Murrelet was found with certainty only in San Mateo county, with a couple of pretty close ones to the boat:
    
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/alvarojaramillo/14775712756/in/photostream/
    
    South Polar Skua was found on three occasions, in both counties. However it was not a good jaeger day, but a nice dark morph Parasitic was superb early on in the trip. Two Common Terns were in San Francisco, and a good smattering of Sabine’s Gulls were about.
    
    PREDICTIONS FOR THE SEASON – The warm water is in, and close to shore. This is not the blue colored, nutrient poor “tuna water” but greener and more nutrient rich water. This is where the murrelets are, and where we found the storm petrels. I think that these conditions are going to continue, with the very warm water in Baja still pretty strong there. Trips in the next month should have great opportunities for both Scripp’s and the sought after Craveri’s murrelets. What Guadalupe Murrelet is doing, we do not yet know as they have not been observed up here so far. The early and strong arrival of Black Storm-Petrels is interesting! My guess is that this may be the year to look for Least Storm-Petrel once the storm-petrel flocks form. I think we were close to a flock the other day, but just could not find it. California wide, look for Wedge-rumped Storm-Petrel down south. Crazy prediction Lots of Buller’s will come in, a boom year, and we will have to be looking hard for Wedge-tailed Shearwaters very soon. This is promising to be a very interesting seabirds season in central California.
    
    Next few trips with remaining spaces:
    Aug 16 – heading to San Francisco waters of the Pioneer Canyon.
    Aug 22 – Half Moon Bay pelagic. Will aim to go to both SF and SM counties.
    Aug 23 – Monterey pelagic.
    
    Good birding!
    
    Alvaro
    
    Alvaro Jaramillo
    alvaro@...
    www.alvarosadventures.com
    
    
  30. -back to top-


-revision history-
v1.30 - 01/05/16 - Revamped cloud logic, optimized database queries, linked to eBird rarities.
v1.23 - 12/08/11 - Added direct link to CBRC records.
v1.22 - 12/03/11 - Corrected GMT offsets on dates. Added last 5 posts at top.
v1.21 - 11/24/11 - Added direct link to range map for NA birds.
v1.2  - 11/23/11 - Greatly improved graphing technology - separates month vs. year by posts. Added species auto-complete functionality.
v1.14 - 11/22/11 - Added cloud bubble for common thread topics.
v1.13 - 11/22/11 - Added integrated photos where available.
v1.12 - 11/22/11 - Added multiple input boxes for additional refinement, negative search criteria (eg. -keyword).
v1.11 - 11/22/11 - Added banding code, species look-up. Also direct link to recent eBird observations.
 v1.1 - 11/22/11 - Added 'date' functionality. Shows top 'month/year' combinations for a query. Restrict results to that 'month/year'.
 v1.0 - 11/21/11 - Initial version coded. Currently archiving 'lacobirds' and 'calbirds'.