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 Month/Year Breakdown (Top 15):

 Jun, 2018 - 4 e-mail(s)...
 Sep, 2002 - 3 e-mail(s)...
 Aug, 2013 - 2 e-mail(s)...
 Oct, 2006 - 1 e-mail(s)...
 Dec, 2006 - 1 e-mail(s)...
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 Nov, 2016 - 1 e-mail(s)...
 Oct, 2002 - 1 e-mail(s)...
 Oct, 2003 - 1 e-mail(s)...



   Thick-billed Murre
Thick-billed Murre
Uria lomvia


   Thick-billed Murre (Uria lomvia) - TBMU (recent eBird sightings, view CBRC records, range map
)

  1. Re: [CALBIRDS] CBRC review and request for documentation LINK
    DATE: Jun 1, 2018 @ 5:01pm, 18 day(s) ago
    Tom
    The part about people deleting their eBird records/photos makes sense!
    Tom
    
    On Fri, Jun 1, 2018, 3:28 PM Thomas Benson tbenson@... [CALBIRDS] < CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com > wrote:
    
    Tom, eBird and the CBRC are two separate entities. Submitting documentation to one does not mean you have submitted documentation to the other. The CBRC reviews records
    of statewide significance, and we maintain our own archives so that we or others are able to review that documentation at a later date if necessary. If we relied on eBird to archive our documentation, there is the possibility that a user could delete his/her
    photos or checklists, or alter the descriptions, defeating the purpose of an archive. There is no plan to merge these processes in the future. Tom
    Thomas A. Benson Secretary, California Bird Records Committee From: T.G. Miko [mailto: tgmiko@... ]
    
    Sent: Friday, June 1, 2018 3:11 PM
    
    To: Thomas Benson < TBenson@... >
    
    Cc: CALBIRDS < CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com >
    
    Subject: Re: [CALBIRDS] CBRC review and request for documentation Tom et Al, I apologise for this question if I, or others have asked this in the past:
    If we posted photos into our eBird entries, why do you need our photos or written descriptions Is there a plan to merge these processes in the future
    Tom Miko
    Claremont LA County
    909.241.3300
    On Fri, Jun 1, 2018, 2:51 PM Thomas Benson
    tbenson@... [CALBIRDS] < CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com > wrote:
    
    California birders,
    
    The California Bird Records Committee (CBRC) will begin reviewing the following records in late June. If you have any documentation to submit for these records, please do so as soon as possible. Feel free to forward this request to local listservs as appropriate.
    Thank you.
    
    Tom
    
    Thomas A. Benson
    Secretary, California Bird Records Committee
    
    King Eider 2018-008 4 Jan 2018 Sutro Baths SF (single observer, documentation complete)
    Buff-collared Nightjar 2018-029 28 Mar 2018 Corona RIV (single observer, documentation complete)
    Marsh Sandpiper 2018-033 15-21 Apr 2018 Yolo Bypass YOL (documentation from 4 observers, addl doc. requested)
    Thick-billed Murre 2018-004 9-19 Mar 2018 Redwood Natl Park DN (single observer, documentation complete)
    Black Vulture 2018-012 22-29 Jan 2018 Doran Reg. Park SON (no documentation received, documentation requested)
    Black Vulture 2018-023 15 Feb-6 Mar 2018 Davenport/Ano Nuevo SCZ/SM (documentation from 3 observers, addl doc. requested)
    Black Vulture 2018-024 12 Feb 2018 Bolinas MRN (single observer, documentation complete)
    Blue-headed Vireo 2018-027 14 Feb-27 Mar 2018 LA River LA (documentation from 3 observers, addl doc. requested)
    Golden-winged Warbler 2018-04522 May 2018 Zzyzx SBE (single observer, documentation complete)
    Graces Warbler 2018-042 5 May 2018 Blue Ridge LA (single observer, documentation complete)
    
    What kind of documentation should one submit to the CBRC Following are some guidelines for submitting media and written descriptions that will be useful for helping the CBRC evaluate records and archive documentation. Documentation may be submitted directly
    to the secretary via email ( secretary@... ) , or by using the online submission form ( http://www.californiabirds.org/report_sighting.html ).
    
    Media: This includes photos, audio recordings, and video. Photographs are usually the most useful documentation for evaluating records. If you have reasonably good (=identifiable) photos, please submit them. If possible, please crop the photos before submission
    so that the bird fills most of the frame. Also, please send originals whenever possible, and not screenshots or back-of-camera photos. How many photos should you submit That really depends on the record. If it is a long-staying rarity that is easily identifiable
    and seen by dozens of people, then a few photos (1-3 per person) are sufficient. If it is a mega-rarity that is difficult to identify and only seen by a one or few people, then send as many photos as possible that show the bird at different angles, postures,
    lighting, etc. Sometimes it is also useful to submit audio and/or video recordings of the bird, as some birds are more easily identified by their vocalizations. If relatively short, most audio recordings are small enough to be submitted via email; please submit
    those along with a brief note indicating the date and location of the recording. Large audio files and video files can be submitted by using a file sharing service; please contact the secretary if you need to submit a file that is too large for email.
    
    Written descriptions: Some written details should always be provided even the best photos should be accompanied by the name of the observer, the date, and the location, at a minimum. Sometimes a photo cant be obtained or vocalizations cant be recorded.
    In some cases, behaviors might be noted in the field that arent preserved well by photos. In these cases, it is helpful to submit a written description of the bird. Ideally, this description should be written as soon after observing the bird as possible;
    it is often helpful to make written notes in the field, or even dictate notes into the voice recorder on your smartphone while observing the bird, from which you can later generate a written description. The most important aspect of a written description is
    that you report only what you observed, and not a general description of the bird from a field guide. At a minimum, your description should include the date and location of the observation, and a description of the bird (size and structure, plumage, vocalizations,
    behavior). A brief discussion of how the bird was identified, and how similar species were eliminated is also helpful. Other useful information you might report includes optics used, distance from bird, lighting or weather conditions, length of time viewed,
    and other observers present.
  2. -back to top-
  3. Re: [CALBIRDS] CBRC review and request for documentation LINK
    DATE: Jun 1, 2018 @ 3:10pm, 18 day(s) ago
    Tom et Al, I apologise for this question if I, or others have asked this in the past:
    If we posted photos into our eBird entries, why do you need our photos or written descriptions Is there a plan to merge these processes in the future
    Tom Miko
    Claremont LA County
    909.241.3300
    
    On Fri, Jun 1, 2018, 2:51 PM Thomas Benson tbenson@... [CALBIRDS] < CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com > wrote:
    
    California birders, The California Bird Records Committee (CBRC) will begin reviewing the following records in late June. If you have any documentation to submit for these records, please do so as soon as possible. Feel free to forward this request to local
    listservs as appropriate. Thank you. Tom Thomas A. Benson Secretary, California Bird Records Committee King Eider 2018-008 4 Jan 2018 Sutro Baths SF (single observer, documentation complete) Buff-collared Nightjar 2018-029 28 Mar 2018 Corona RIV (single observer, documentation complete) Marsh Sandpiper 2018-033 15-21 Apr 2018 Yolo Bypass YOL (documentation from 4 observers, addl doc. requested) Thick-billed Murre 2018-004 9-19 Mar 2018 Redwood Natl Park DN (single observer, documentation complete) Black Vulture 2018-012 22-29 Jan 2018 Doran Reg. Park SON (no documentation received, documentation requested) Black Vulture 2018-023 15 Feb-6 Mar 2018 Davenport/Ano Nuevo SCZ/SM (documentation from 3 observers, addl doc. requested) Black Vulture 2018-024 12 Feb 2018 Bolinas MRN (single observer, documentation complete) Blue-headed Vireo 2018-027 14 Feb-27 Mar 2018 LA River LA (documentation from 3 observers, addl doc. requested) Golden-winged Warbler 2018-04522 May 2018 Zzyzx SBE (single observer, documentation complete) Graces Warbler 2018-042 5 May 2018 Blue Ridge LA (single observer, documentation complete) What kind of documentation should one submit to the CBRC Following are some guidelines for submitting media and written descriptions that will be useful for helping the CBRC evaluate records and archive documentation. Documentation may
    be submitted directly to the secretary via email ( secretary@... ) , or by using the online submission form ( http://www.californiabirds.org/report_sighting.html ). Media: This includes photos, audio recordings, and video. Photographs are usually the most useful documentation for evaluating records. If you have reasonably good (=identifiable) photos, please submit them. If possible, please crop the
    photos before submission so that the bird fills most of the frame. Also, please send originals whenever possible, and not screenshots or back-of-camera photos. How many photos should you submit That really depends on the record. If it is a long-staying rarity
    that is easily identifiable and seen by dozens of people, then a few photos (1-3 per person) are sufficient. If it is a mega-rarity that is difficult to identify and only seen by a one or few people, then send as many photos as possible that show the bird
    at different angles, postures, lighting, etc. Sometimes it is also useful to submit audio and/or video recordings of the bird, as some birds are more easily identified by their vocalizations. If relatively short, most audio recordings are small enough to be
    submitted via email; please submit those along with a brief note indicating the date and location of the recording. Large audio files and video files can be submitted by using a file sharing service; please contact the secretary if you need to submit a file
    that is too large for email. Written descriptions: Some written details should always be provided even the best photos should be accompanied by the name of the observer, the date, and the location, at a minimum. Sometimes a photo cant be obtained or vocalizations
    cant be recorded. In some cases, behaviors might be noted in the field that arent preserved well by photos. In these cases, it is helpful to submit a written description of the bird. Ideally, this description should be written as soon after observing the
    bird as possible; it is often helpful to make written notes in the field, or even dictate notes into the voice recorder on your smartphone while observing the bird, from which you can later generate a written description. The most important aspect of a written
    description is that you report only what you observed, and not a general description of the bird from a field guide. At a minimum, your description should include the date and location of the observation, and a description of the bird (size and structure,
    plumage, vocalizations, behavior). A brief discussion of how the bird was identified, and how similar species were eliminated is also helpful. Other useful information you might report includes optics used, distance from bird, lighting or weather conditions,
    length of time viewed, and other observers present. 
  4. -back to top-
  5. RE: [CALBIRDS] CBRC review and request for documentation LINK
    DATE: Jun 1, 2018 @ 3:27pm, 18 day(s) ago
    Tom, eBird and the CBRC are two separate entities. Submitting documentation to one does not mean you have submitted documentation to the other. The CBRC reviews records
    of statewide significance, and we maintain our own archives so that we or others are able to review that documentation at a later date if necessary. If we relied on eBird to archive our documentation, there is the possibility that a user could delete his/her
    photos or checklists, or alter the descriptions, defeating the purpose of an archive. There is no plan to merge these processes in the future. Tom
    Thomas A. Benson Secretary, California Bird Records Committee From: T.G. Miko [mailto:tgmiko@...]
    
    Sent: Friday, June 1, 2018 3:11 PM
    
    To: Thomas Benson
    
    Cc: CALBIRDS
    
    Subject: Re: [CALBIRDS] CBRC review and request for documentation Tom et Al, I apologise for this question if I, or others have asked this in the past:
    If we posted photos into our eBird entries, why do you need our photos or written descriptions Is there a plan to merge these processes in the future
    Tom Miko
    Claremont LA County
    909.241.3300
    On Fri, Jun 1, 2018, 2:51 PM Thomas Benson
    tbenson@... [CALBIRDS] < CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com > wrote:
    
    California birders,
    
    The California Bird Records Committee (CBRC) will begin reviewing the following records in late June. If you have any documentation to submit for these records, please do so as soon as possible. Feel free to forward this request to local listservs as appropriate.
    Thank you.
    
    Tom
    
    Thomas A. Benson
    Secretary, California Bird Records Committee
    
    King Eider 2018-008 4 Jan 2018 Sutro Baths SF (single observer, documentation complete)
    Buff-collared Nightjar 2018-029 28 Mar 2018 Corona RIV (single observer, documentation complete)
    Marsh Sandpiper 2018-033 15-21 Apr 2018 Yolo Bypass YOL (documentation from 4 observers, addl doc. requested)
    Thick-billed Murre 2018-004 9-19 Mar 2018 Redwood Natl Park DN (single observer, documentation complete)
    Black Vulture 2018-012 22-29 Jan 2018 Doran Reg. Park SON (no documentation received, documentation requested)
    Black Vulture 2018-023 15 Feb-6 Mar 2018 Davenport/Ano Nuevo SCZ/SM (documentation from 3 observers, addl doc. requested)
    Black Vulture 2018-024 12 Feb 2018 Bolinas MRN (single observer, documentation complete)
    Blue-headed Vireo 2018-027 14 Feb-27 Mar 2018 LA River LA (documentation from 3 observers, addl doc. requested)
    Golden-winged Warbler 2018-04522 May 2018 Zzyzx SBE (single observer, documentation complete)
    Graces Warbler 2018-042 5 May 2018 Blue Ridge LA (single observer, documentation complete)
    
    What kind of documentation should one submit to the CBRC Following are some guidelines for submitting media and written descriptions that will be useful for helping the CBRC evaluate records and archive documentation. Documentation may be submitted directly
    to the secretary via email ( secretary@... ) , or by using the online submission form ( http://www.californiabirds.org/report_sighting.html ).
    
    Media: This includes photos, audio recordings, and video. Photographs are usually the most useful documentation for evaluating records. If you have reasonably good (=identifiable) photos, please submit them. If possible, please crop the photos before submission
    so that the bird fills most of the frame. Also, please send originals whenever possible, and not screenshots or back-of-camera photos. How many photos should you submit That really depends on the record. If it is a long-staying rarity that is easily identifiable
    and seen by dozens of people, then a few photos (1-3 per person) are sufficient. If it is a mega-rarity that is difficult to identify and only seen by a one or few people, then send as many photos as possible that show the bird at different angles, postures,
    lighting, etc. Sometimes it is also useful to submit audio and/or video recordings of the bird, as some birds are more easily identified by their vocalizations. If relatively short, most audio recordings are small enough to be submitted via email; please submit
    those along with a brief note indicating the date and location of the recording. Large audio files and video files can be submitted by using a file sharing service; please contact the secretary if you need to submit a file that is too large for email.
    
    Written descriptions: Some written details should always be provided even the best photos should be accompanied by the name of the observer, the date, and the location, at a minimum. Sometimes a photo cant be obtained or vocalizations cant be recorded.
    In some cases, behaviors might be noted in the field that arent preserved well by photos. In these cases, it is helpful to submit a written description of the bird. Ideally, this description should be written as soon after observing the bird as possible;
    it is often helpful to make written notes in the field, or even dictate notes into the voice recorder on your smartphone while observing the bird, from which you can later generate a written description. The most important aspect of a written description is
    that you report only what you observed, and not a general description of the bird from a field guide. At a minimum, your description should include the date and location of the observation, and a description of the bird (size and structure, plumage, vocalizations,
    behavior). A brief discussion of how the bird was identified, and how similar species were eliminated is also helpful. Other useful information you might report includes optics used, distance from bird, lighting or weather conditions, length of time viewed,
    and other observers present.
  6. -back to top-
  7. CBRC review and request for documentation LINK
    DATE: Jun 1, 2018 @ 2:48pm, 18 day(s) ago
    California birders, The California Bird Records Committee (CBRC) will begin reviewing the following records in late June. If you have any documentation to submit for these records, please do so as soon as possible. Feel free to forward this request to local
    listservs as appropriate. Thank you. Tom Thomas A. Benson Secretary, California Bird Records Committee King Eider 2018-008 4 Jan 2018 Sutro Baths SF (single observer, documentation complete) Buff-collared Nightjar 2018-029 28 Mar 2018 Corona RIV (single observer, documentation complete) Marsh Sandpiper 2018-033 15-21 Apr 2018 Yolo Bypass YOL (documentation from 4 observers, addl doc. requested) Thick-billed Murre 2018-004 9-19 Mar 2018 Redwood Natl Park DN (single observer, documentation complete) Black Vulture 2018-012 22-29 Jan 2018 Doran Reg. Park SON (no documentation received, documentation requested) Black Vulture 2018-023 15 Feb-6 Mar 2018 Davenport/Ano Nuevo SCZ/SM (documentation from 3 observers, addl doc. requested) Black Vulture 2018-024 12 Feb 2018 Bolinas MRN (single observer, documentation complete) Blue-headed Vireo 2018-027 14 Feb-27 Mar 2018 LA River LA (documentation from 3 observers, addl doc. requested) Golden-winged Warbler 2018-04522 May 2018 Zzyzx SBE (single observer, documentation complete) Graces Warbler 2018-042 5 May 2018 Blue Ridge LA (single observer, documentation complete) What kind of documentation should one submit to the CBRC Following are some guidelines for submitting media and written descriptions that will be useful for helping the CBRC evaluate records and archive documentation. Documentation may
    be submitted directly to the secretary via email ( secretary@... ) , or by using the online submission form ( http://www.californiabirds.org/report_sighting.html ). Media: This includes photos, audio recordings, and video. Photographs are usually the most useful documentation for evaluating records. If you have reasonably good (=identifiable) photos, please submit them. If possible, please crop the
    photos before submission so that the bird fills most of the frame. Also, please send originals whenever possible, and not screenshots or back-of-camera photos. How many photos should you submit That really depends on the record. If it is a long-staying rarity
    that is easily identifiable and seen by dozens of people, then a few photos (1-3 per person) are sufficient. If it is a mega-rarity that is difficult to identify and only seen by a one or few people, then send as many photos as possible that show the bird
    at different angles, postures, lighting, etc. Sometimes it is also useful to submit audio and/or video recordings of the bird, as some birds are more easily identified by their vocalizations. If relatively short, most audio recordings are small enough to be
    submitted via email; please submit those along with a brief note indicating the date and location of the recording. Large audio files and video files can be submitted by using a file sharing service; please contact the secretary if you need to submit a file
    that is too large for email. Written descriptions: Some written details should always be provided even the best photos should be accompanied by the name of the observer, the date, and the location, at a minimum. Sometimes a photo cant be obtained or vocalizations
    cant be recorded. In some cases, behaviors might be noted in the field that arent preserved well by photos. In these cases, it is helpful to submit a written description of the bird. Ideally, this description should be written as soon after observing the
    bird as possible; it is often helpful to make written notes in the field, or even dictate notes into the voice recorder on your smartphone while observing the bird, from which you can later generate a written description. The most important aspect of a written
    description is that you report only what you observed, and not a general description of the bird from a field guide. At a minimum, your description should include the date and location of the observation, and a description of the bird (size and structure,
    plumage, vocalizations, behavior). A brief discussion of how the bird was identified, and how similar species were eliminated is also helpful. Other useful information you might report includes optics used, distance from bird, lighting or weather conditions,
    length of time viewed, and other observers present. 
  8. -back to top-
  9. Request for documentation for CBRC review species LINK
    DATE: Nov 17, 2016, 2 year(s) ago
    Greeting Calbirders,   As fall migration is winding down, I hope that you all got out and saw some good birds over the past few months. There were a number of reports on listservs and on eBird of California Bird Records Committee (CBRC)
    review species . If you saw any of these, I encourage you to submit your documentation (written descriptions, photos, and/or audio recordings) to the CBRC. In particular, I have included a list below
    for which the CBRC has received little or no documentation. If you have not submitted documentation to the CBRC previously and you don’t know what to include, please visit the
    CBRC website where you can find
    submission guidelines as well as a
    report form . One of the CBRC’s primary purposes is to permanently maintain documentation of rare birds in order to better understand the status and distribution of birds in California, as well
    as to preserve these records for future research. Your submission of documentation greatly facilitates the work of the CBRC in pursuing this goal.   Great () Frigatebird – Point Pinos MTY, 2 Nov: 0 reports Nazca Booby – Point Pinos MTY, 14 Nov: 0 reports Black Vulture – Bodega Bay SON, 22 Oct-8 Nov: 0 reports Bar-tailed Godwit – Shoreline Park ALA, 3-5 Sep: 1 report Little Stint – Tolowa Dunes DN, 1 Aug: 1 report Little Stint – Centerville Wetlands HUM, 31 Aug: 1 report Little Stint – San Jacinto Wildlife Area RIV, 9-15 Oct: 3 reports Red-necked Stint – Humboldt Bay HUM, 14 Aug: 3 reports Red-necked Stint – Eel River Estuary HUM, 1 Sep: 0 reports Red-necked Stint – San Jacinto Wildlife Area RIV, 5-9 Sep: 3 reports Thick-billed Murre – near Bodega Head SON, 9 Oct: 3 reports Yellow-bellied Flycatcher – Humboldt Bay HUM, 16-21 Sep: 2 reports Dusky-capped Flycatcher – Antonelli Pond SCZ, 4 Sep: 0 reports Dusky-capped Flycatcher – Point Pinos MTY, 14-16 Nov: 0 reports Sulphur-bellied Flycatcher – Carpinteria Creek SBA, 30 Sep: 0 reports Blue-headed Vireo – Fort Rosecrans Nat’l Cemetery SD, 18 Sep: 0 reports Winter Wren – Crystal Spring SBE/INY, 5-7 Nov: 1 report Dusky Warbler – Oyster Point SM, 24-26 Sep: 4 reports Rufous-backed Robin – Chiriaco Summit RIV, 13-14 Oct: 0 reports Rufous-backed Robin – Desert Center RIV, 12-16 Nov: 0 reports Mourning Warbler – Galileo Hill KER, 10-11 Sep, 3 reports Cape May Warbler – Point Reyes MRN, 11 Oct: 0 reports Cape May Warbler – Palo Alto SCL, 15-17 Oct: 1 report Rusty Blackbird – Smith River DN, 15 Nov: 0 reports Streak-backed Oriole – Desert Center RIV, 23-24 Oct: 3 reports Common Grackle – Smith River DN, 15 Nov: 0 reports   Thank you, Tom   Thomas A. Benson Secretary, California Bird Records Committee secretary@...  
  10. -back to top-
  11. 3 pelagic cruises summary Summer 2013 off n. CA, OR, WA, BC, se. AK LINK
    DATE: Aug 12, 2013 @ 2:22pm, 5 year(s) ago
    During the summer of 2013 I took the same 10-day round-trip cruise three
    times between San Francisco and southeast Alaska and back. These trips
    are offered continuously between about mid-May and early/mid- September
    by Princess Cruises and cost about $1500 to share an interior room
    (includes most shipboard activities and limitless good food--burp!),
    more for balcony suites, etc. The avian advantage of taking this routing
    is that the ship spends at least two full days going both northbound and
    then again going southbound WELL OFFSHORE, which the many cruises doing
    the "Inside Passage" to/from Alaska from Seattle or Vancouver do not do.
    On the northbound leg, we were often well over 100 miles offshore (up to
    180 miles), whereas on the southbound leg we were typically 30-60 miles
    offshore. About half of the Princess ships have excellent vantage points
    near or right at the bow, so viewing (much of it with scopes given the
    steadiness of the ride) and even photographic opportunities are good.
    The ship scheduled to be used in 2014 also has the same good
    observational deck plan as the vessel used this year.
    
    Unfortunately, given that these cruise ships go full speed ahead even at
    night, we "missed" a lot of great water in the darkness. Most of the
    pelagic waters off Washington and the pelagic waters off extreme
    southeast Alaska regularly got such a raw deal both going and coming.
    
    These trips are also excellent for a variety of marine mammals.
    
    Thanks to Larry Peavler, Steve Ritt, Dona Coates and group, Jeff
    Gilligan, Owen Schmidt, Barbara Carlson, and my Wings tour group for
    each joining on one of the cruises this year.
    
    The waters FAR off the coasts of northwest CA, OR, WA, and BC are not
    well covered, and relatively little coverage occurs in most regions at
    all in summer. Thus, I was especially interested in what we would see,
    and here is a summary for those interested in what was out there during
    only three trips during one year, and often with only one or a very few
    observers doing much of the looking. So who knows what we missed!!
    
    The three trips I took were as follows:
    TRIP 1: 30 May - 8 June 2013
    TRIP 2: 9 - 18 July 2013
    TRIP 3: 29 July - 7 August 2013
    
    SPECIES:
    
    Pacific Loon: uncommon in early June, none thereafter except for
    surprising alternate bird well at sea off Haida Gwaii (Queen Charlotte
    Islands) and basic bird well off Vancouver Island, BC, both on 16 Jul;
    seems odd to have birds well offshore in mid-summer.
    
    Yellow-billed Loon: 1 off Sitka, AK, on 2 Jun.
    
    LAYSAN ALBATROSS: 2 off n. CA on 31 May, 1 off s. OR on 8 Jun, and 2
    off n. CA on 7 Aug; summer is not a great time of year for this
    species, so the total of 5 is perhaps on par.
    
    Black-footed Albatross: fairly common to common throughout, with high
    counts of 225 off s. OR on 8 Jun and 600 off BC on 5 Aug.
    
    Northern Fulmar: small to moderate numbers south to Sonoma County CA in
    early summer, increasing in Aug to a high of 70 off BC on 16 Jul and 325
    there 5 Aug.
    
    MURPHY'S PETREL: it is mostly thought that this species is 'expected'
    in spring as late perhaps as early June, and sure enough, 1 was off n CA
    and 7 were off OR on 31 May, with 1 rarer still off s. BC on 1 Jun; but
    less expected were the 5 off n. CA and 5 off OR on 10 Jul.
    
    HAWAIIAN/DARK-RUMPED PETREL: the substantial increase in records of
    this species was particularly evident in 2013, with over 10 birds seen
    on spring repositioning cruises off CA and OR, and then 1 off n. CA on
    10 Jul, exceptionally 1 off s. BC on 11 Jul (where only a couple
    records, perhaps), a high total of 11 birds off s. OR and n. CA under
    windy conditions on 18 Jul, and finally 1 bird off extreme s. OR on 30
    Jul (for photos, see:
    
    http://oschmidt.net/OwenLSchmidtLLC/HAPE.html).
    
    COOK'S PETREL: only individual seen was off n. CA on 30 Jul; clearly an
    "off" year for this species, as also evidenced by just a few seen this
    past spring from several repositioning cruises.
    
    Pink-footed Shearwater: increasingly common as the season progressed,
    as expected in this species, with birds also spreading farther and
    farther north (i.e., northernmost off cen. Vancouver Island on Trip 1,
    off n. Vancouver Island on Trip 2, and off Haida Gwaii on Trip 3;
    largest concentration was 5000 birds off nw. WA on 17 Jul.
    
    FLESH-FOOTED SHEARWATER: singles were off OR on 8 Jun and off s. BC on
    16 Jul; very rare in summer.
    
    GREAT SHEARWATER: the second or third record for BC was established by
    a bird photo'd (see
    http://oschmidt.net/OwenLSchmidtLLC/GRSH.html) between Haida Gwaii and
    n. Vancouver Is. on 5 Aug.
    
    BULLER'S SHEARWATER: very unusual was 1 off OR on 8 Jun, the earliest
    record for that state by over a month; then 1 off BC on 31 Jul and total
    of 12 off OR and n. CA on 7 Aug were more typical.
    
    Sooty Shearwater: uncommon to fairly common (well offshore) to common
    (nearshore), as expected, but with no one-day total exceeding 800 birds
    (but see Short-tailed, below).
    
    SHORT-TAILED SHEARWATER: one of the more surprising and sobering events
    was the early-morning sailing through a huge concentration of 80,000
    dark shearwaters in Hecate Strait (east of Haida Gwaii), BC, on 6 Jun;
    near the end of the masses, with better light and closer birds, I could
    tell that a substantial percent were Short-tailed Shearwaters (!), a
    species which is thought of as rare to casual after early spring off the
    West Coast east of the western Gulf of Alaska. How many birds of the
    80,000 were Short-taileds, I don't know. One problem of being on a large
    cruise ship is that you can't ask them to turn around to re-investigate
    birds! Hopefully somebody will be able to check this area next year at
    this time.... And then on 16 Jul I saw 5 Short-taileds in this same
    general area. Also unusual was 1 in well inshore marine waters inside
    Glacier Bay, AK, on 14 Jul.
    
    MANX SHEARWATER: 1 off s. BC on 6 Jun and 3 separate birds s. of Haida
    Gwaii, BC, on 16 Jul.
    
    Fork-tailed Storm-Petrel: common throughout; many single-day totals of
    up to 250, with 700 off BC on both 6 Jun and 16 Jul and a mass of 10,000
    off the n. end of Vancouver Island on 5 Aug.
    
    Leach's Storm-Petrel: very common well offshore; in fact, often the
    most common and widespread species over deep water throughout route,
    with high counts of 2600 off BC on 6 Jun and 7200 there on 5 Aug.
    
    Ashy Storm-Petrel: 30 at Cordell Bank, CA, on 29 Jul--where
    expected--were the only ones seen.
    
    Black Storm-Petrel: 1 at Cordell Bank, CA--near the usual northern
    limit of its range--on 29 Jul was the only one seen.
    
    Pelagic Cormorant: this generally not very 'pelagic' species was seen
    several times 37-40 miles offshore off n. BC
    
    Marbled Godwit: flock of 22 some 34 miles offshore off n. CA on 18 Jul
    was somewhat entertaining.
    
    Red-necked Phalarope: rare on Trip 1, but fairly common on Trips 2 & 3,
    with a high count of 700 off nw. WA on 17 Jul.
    
    Red Phalarope: uncommon on Trips 1 & 2, fairly common on Trip 3, with a
    high count of 200 off n. CA on 7 Aug.
    
    Black-legged Kittiwake: none seen south of Sitka, AK.
    
    Sabine's Gull: 30 off BC on 1 Jun was a good count for the date, as
    were the 20 off OR on 18 Jul; 1 off n CA on 10 Jul and 4 off BC on 11
    Jul; uncommon and widespread on Trip 3.
    
    California Gull: just a few seen offshore during the three trips,
    probably because it was summer.
    
    Glaucous-winged Gull: ditto
    
    Aleutian Tern: 4 at Glacier Bay, AK, on 14 July were at the
    southeasternmost known nesting locale.
    
    Arctic Tern: uncommon (early summer) to fairly common (late summer) and
    widespread offshore, with 7 off BC on 1 Jun, 7 there on 6 Jun, and 4 off
    n. CA on 8 Jun being slightly more unusual; high count of 40 off OR on 7
    Aug.
    
    South Polar Skua: more numerous than expected, widespread along route
    in small numbers, with the 'hot-spot' on all three cruises being the
    waters well off the BC coast west of between Vancouver Island and Haida
    Gwaii where up to 6/trip seen; the actual one-day high was 10 birds off
    n. CA on 7 Aug.
    
    Pomarine Jaeger: less numerous than expected, even given time of year,
    with fewer than 5 on both Trips 1 & 2, and 26 seen on Trip 3.
    
    Parasitic Jaeger: uncommon throughout, with one-day high of 8 on 7 Aug
    off OR and n. CA; this species is scarce in deep water far offshore.
    
    Long-tailed Jaeger: the dominant jaeger in deep waters well offshore,
    with the early-summer hot-spot the same BC area as for South Polar Skua,
    with 11 there on 1 Jun; Trips 2 & 3 recorded them throughout and were
    uncommon to fairly common, with a high count on Trip 2 of 10 off BC on
    11 Jul, and on Trip 3 of 22 off OR on 30 Jul and 53 off OR on 7 Aug.
    
    Common Murre: fairly common close to shore; not found far offshore;
    farthest out were several on several dates to 55 miles offshore.
    
    THICK-BILLED MURRE: 1 off n. BC on 6 Jun.
    
    Marbled Murrelet: a notable concentration was 5000 birds in the Glacier
    Bay/Icy Strait area, AK, on 3 Aug; none seen south of Alaska, as
    expected, when offshore.
    
    Kittlitz's Murrelet: common in Glacier Bay, AK, with 800 there on 3
    Jun, 300 there 14 Jul, and 55 on 3 Aug (it is typical for numbers to
    wane as the late summer approaches)
    
    SCRIPPS'S MURRELET: northerly were 1 off BC on 31 Jul, 2 off OR on 7
    Aug, and 1 off n. CA on 7 Aug. Guadalupe Murrelets are also possible here.
    
    Ancient Murrelet: common early in season off BC and se. AK, with a high
    count of 300 off se. AK on 2 Jun and 630 off BC on 6 Jun; numbers much
    reduced on later cruises.
    
    Cassin's Auklet: fairly common to common throughout, with a high count
    of 11,000 off BC on 6 Jun.
    
    PARAKEET AUKLET: a residual of the winter and spring 'invasion' were
    the 7 off Haida Gwaii, BC, on 1 Jun.
    
    LEAST AUKLET: probably the top 'shocker' of the three cruises was this
    adult, with Cassin's Auklets, between Haida Gwaii and n. Vancouver
    Island on 6 Jun, establishing perhaps the second BC record.
    
    Rhinoceros Auklet: fairly common to common throughout, with the largest
    count being 675 off BC on 5 Aug.
    
    Horned Puffin: none seen south of Glacier Bay, AK.
    
    Tufted Puffin: uncommon to fairly common throughout, with surprisingly
    none in CA waters, a high of 4 off OR, 6 off WA, and 85 off BC (and
    locally common in AK).
    
    Eurasian Collared-Dove: 1 was 46 miles off OR on 8 Jun.
    
    Peregrine Falcon: 1 was 42 miles off n. BC on 5 Aug.
    
    --PAUL LEHMAN, San Diego (lehman.paul@...)
    
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  12. -back to top-
  13. 3 pelagic cruises summary Summer 2013 off n. CA, OR, WA, BC, se. AK LINK
    DATE: Aug 12, 2013 @ 2:22pm, 5 year(s) ago
    During the summer of 2013 I took the same 10-day round-trip cruise three
    times between San Francisco and southeast Alaska and back. These trips
    are offered continuously between about mid-May and early/mid- September
    by Princess Cruises and cost about $1500 to share an interior room
    (includes most shipboard activities and limitless good food--burp!),
    more for balcony suites, etc. The avian advantage of taking this routing
    is that the ship spends at least two full days going both northbound and
    then again going southbound WELL OFFSHORE, which the many cruises doing
    the "Inside Passage" to/from Alaska from Seattle or Vancouver do not do.
    On the northbound leg, we were often well over 100 miles offshore (up to
    180 miles), whereas on the southbound leg we were typically 30-60 miles
    offshore. About half of the Princess ships have excellent vantage points
    near or right at the bow, so viewing (much of it with scopes given the
    steadiness of the ride) and even photographic opportunities are good.
    The ship scheduled to be used in 2014 also has the same good
    observational deck plan as the vessel used this year.
    
    Unfortunately, given that these cruise ships go full speed ahead even at
    night, we "missed" a lot of great water in the darkness. Most of the
    pelagic waters off Washington and the pelagic waters off extreme
    southeast Alaska regularly got such a raw deal both going and coming.
    
    These trips are also excellent for a variety of marine mammals.
    
    Thanks to Larry Peavler, Steve Ritt, Dona Coates and group, Jeff
    Gilligan, Owen Schmidt, Barbara Carlson, and my Wings tour group for
    each joining on one of the cruises this year.
    
    The waters FAR off the coasts of northwest CA, OR, WA, and BC are not
    well covered, and relatively little coverage occurs in most regions at
    all in summer. Thus, I was especially interested in what we would see,
    and here is a summary for those interested in what was out there during
    only three trips during one year, and often with only one or a very few
    observers doing much of the looking. So who knows what we missed!!
    
    The three trips I took were as follows:
    TRIP 1: 30 May - 8 June 2013
    TRIP 2: 9 - 18 July 2013
    TRIP 3: 29 July - 7 August 2013
    
    SPECIES:
    
    Pacific Loon: uncommon in early June, none thereafter except for
    surprising alternate bird well at sea off Haida Gwaii (Queen Charlotte
    Islands) and basic bird well off Vancouver Island, BC, both on 16 Jul;
    seems odd to have birds well offshore in mid-summer.
    
    Yellow-billed Loon: 1 off Sitka, AK, on 2 Jun.
    
    LAYSAN ALBATROSS: 2 off n. CA on 31 May, 1 off s. OR on 8 Jun, and 2
    off n. CA on 7 Aug; summer is not a great time of year for this
    species, so the total of 5 is perhaps on par.
    
    Black-footed Albatross: fairly common to common throughout, with high
    counts of 225 off s. OR on 8 Jun and 600 off BC on 5 Aug.
    
    Northern Fulmar: small to moderate numbers south to Sonoma County CA in
    early summer, increasing in Aug to a high of 70 off BC on 16 Jul and 325
    there 5 Aug.
    
    MURPHY'S PETREL: it is mostly thought that this species is 'expected'
    in spring as late perhaps as early June, and sure enough, 1 was off n CA
    and 7 were off OR on 31 May, with 1 rarer still off s. BC on 1 Jun; but
    less expected were the 5 off n. CA and 5 off OR on 10 Jul.
    
    HAWAIIAN/DARK-RUMPED PETREL: the substantial increase in records of
    this species was particularly evident in 2013, with over 10 birds seen
    on spring repositioning cruises off CA and OR, and then 1 off n. CA on
    10 Jul, exceptionally 1 off s. BC on 11 Jul (where only a couple
    records, perhaps), a high total of 11 birds off s. OR and n. CA under
    windy conditions on 18 Jul, and finally 1 bird off extreme s. OR on 30
    Jul (for photos, see:
    
    http://oschmidt.net/OwenLSchmidtLLC/HAPE.html).
    
    COOK'S PETREL: only individual seen was off n. CA on 30 Jul; clearly an
    "off" year for this species, as also evidenced by just a few seen this
    past spring from several repositioning cruises.
    
    Pink-footed Shearwater: increasingly common as the season progressed,
    as expected in this species, with birds also spreading farther and
    farther north (i.e., northernmost off cen. Vancouver Island on Trip 1,
    off n. Vancouver Island on Trip 2, and off Haida Gwaii on Trip 3;
    largest concentration was 5000 birds off nw. WA on 17 Jul.
    
    FLESH-FOOTED SHEARWATER: singles were off OR on 8 Jun and off s. BC on
    16 Jul; very rare in summer.
    
    GREAT SHEARWATER: the second or third record for BC was established by
    a bird photo'd (see
    http://oschmidt.net/OwenLSchmidtLLC/GRSH.html) between Haida Gwaii and
    n. Vancouver Is. on 5 Aug.
    
    BULLER'S SHEARWATER: very unusual was 1 off OR on 8 Jun, the earliest
    record for that state by over a month; then 1 off BC on 31 Jul and total
    of 12 off OR and n. CA on 7 Aug were more typical.
    
    Sooty Shearwater: uncommon to fairly common (well offshore) to common
    (nearshore), as expected, but with no one-day total exceeding 800 birds
    (but see Short-tailed, below).
    
    SHORT-TAILED SHEARWATER: one of the more surprising and sobering events
    was the early-morning sailing through a huge concentration of 80,000
    dark shearwaters in Hecate Strait (east of Haida Gwaii), BC, on 6 Jun;
    near the end of the masses, with better light and closer birds, I could
    tell that a substantial percent were Short-tailed Shearwaters (!), a
    species which is thought of as rare to casual after early spring off the
    West Coast east of the western Gulf of Alaska. How many birds of the
    80,000 were Short-taileds, I don't know. One problem of being on a large
    cruise ship is that you can't ask them to turn around to re-investigate
    birds! Hopefully somebody will be able to check this area next year at
    this time.... And then on 16 Jul I saw 5 Short-taileds in this same
    general area. Also unusual was 1 in well inshore marine waters inside
    Glacier Bay, AK, on 14 Jul.
    
    MANX SHEARWATER: 1 off s. BC on 6 Jun and 3 separate birds s. of Haida
    Gwaii, BC, on 16 Jul.
    
    Fork-tailed Storm-Petrel: common throughout; many single-day totals of
    up to 250, with 700 off BC on both 6 Jun and 16 Jul and a mass of 10,000
    off the n. end of Vancouver Island on 5 Aug.
    
    Leach's Storm-Petrel: very common well offshore; in fact, often the
    most common and widespread species over deep water throughout route,
    with high counts of 2600 off BC on 6 Jun and 7200 there on 5 Aug.
    
    Ashy Storm-Petrel: 30 at Cordell Bank, CA, on 29 Jul--where
    expected--were the only ones seen.
    
    Black Storm-Petrel: 1 at Cordell Bank, CA--near the usual northern
    limit of its range--on 29 Jul was the only one seen.
    
    Pelagic Cormorant: this generally not very 'pelagic' species was seen
    several times 37-40 miles offshore off n. BC
    
    Marbled Godwit: flock of 22 some 34 miles offshore off n. CA on 18 Jul
    was somewhat entertaining.
    
    Red-necked Phalarope: rare on Trip 1, but fairly common on Trips 2 & 3,
    with a high count of 700 off nw. WA on 17 Jul.
    
    Red Phalarope: uncommon on Trips 1 & 2, fairly common on Trip 3, with a
    high count of 200 off n. CA on 7 Aug.
    
    Black-legged Kittiwake: none seen south of Sitka, AK.
    
    Sabine's Gull: 30 off BC on 1 Jun was a good count for the date, as
    were the 20 off OR on 18 Jul; 1 off n CA on 10 Jul and 4 off BC on 11
    Jul; uncommon and widespread on Trip 3.
    
    California Gull: just a few seen offshore during the three trips,
    probably because it was summer.
    
    Glaucous-winged Gull: ditto
    
    Aleutian Tern: 4 at Glacier Bay, AK, on 14 July were at the
    southeasternmost known nesting locale.
    
    Arctic Tern: uncommon (early summer) to fairly common (late summer) and
    widespread offshore, with 7 off BC on 1 Jun, 7 there on 6 Jun, and 4 off
    n. CA on 8 Jun being slightly more unusual; high count of 40 off OR on 7
    Aug.
    
    South Polar Skua: more numerous than expected, widespread along route
    in small numbers, with the 'hot-spot' on all three cruises being the
    waters well off the BC coast west of between Vancouver Island and Haida
    Gwaii where up to 6/trip seen; the actual one-day high was 10 birds off
    n. CA on 7 Aug.
    
    Pomarine Jaeger: less numerous than expected, even given time of year,
    with fewer than 5 on both Trips 1 & 2, and 26 seen on Trip 3.
    
    Parasitic Jaeger: uncommon throughout, with one-day high of 8 on 7 Aug
    off OR and n. CA; this species is scarce in deep water far offshore.
    
    Long-tailed Jaeger: the dominant jaeger in deep waters well offshore,
    with the early-summer hot-spot the same BC area as for South Polar Skua,
    with 11 there on 1 Jun; Trips 2 & 3 recorded them throughout and were
    uncommon to fairly common, with a high count on Trip 2 of 10 off BC on
    11 Jul, and on Trip 3 of 22 off OR on 30 Jul and 53 off OR on 7 Aug.
    
    Common Murre: fairly common close to shore; not found far offshore;
    farthest out were several on several dates to 55 miles offshore.
    
    THICK-BILLED MURRE: 1 off n. BC on 6 Jun.
    
    Marbled Murrelet: a notable concentration was 5000 birds in the Glacier
    Bay/Icy Strait area, AK, on 3 Aug; none seen south of Alaska, as
    expected, when offshore.
    
    Kittlitz's Murrelet: common in Glacier Bay, AK, with 800 there on 3
    Jun, 300 there 14 Jul, and 55 on 3 Aug (it is typical for numbers to
    wane as the late summer approaches)
    
    SCRIPPS'S MURRELET: northerly were 1 off BC on 31 Jul, 2 off OR on 7
    Aug, and 1 off n. CA on 7 Aug. Guadalupe Murrelets are also possible here.
    
    Ancient Murrelet: common early in season off BC and se. AK, with a high
    count of 300 off se. AK on 2 Jun and 630 off BC on 6 Jun; numbers much
    reduced on later cruises.
    
    Cassin's Auklet: fairly common to common throughout, with a high count
    of 11,000 off BC on 6 Jun.
    
    PARAKEET AUKLET: a residual of the winter and spring 'invasion' were
    the 7 off Haida Gwaii, BC, on 1 Jun.
    
    LEAST AUKLET: probably the top 'shocker' of the three cruises was this
    adult, with Cassin's Auklets, between Haida Gwaii and n. Vancouver
    Island on 6 Jun, establishing perhaps the second BC record.
    
    Rhinoceros Auklet: fairly common to common throughout, with the largest
    count being 675 off BC on 5 Aug.
    
    Horned Puffin: none seen south of Glacier Bay, AK.
    
    Tufted Puffin: uncommon to fairly common throughout, with surprisingly
    none in CA waters, a high of 4 off OR, 6 off WA, and 85 off BC (and
    locally common in AK).
    
    Eurasian Collared-Dove: 1 was 46 miles off OR on 8 Jun.
    
    Peregrine Falcon: 1 was 42 miles off n. BC on 5 Aug.
    
    --PAUL LEHMAN, San Diego (lehman.paul@...)
    
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  14. -back to top-
  15. Thick-billed Murre in LA Times? LINK
    DATE: Mar 8, 2012 @ 2:52am, 6 year(s) ago
    Hi,
    
    A fun little note...I was reading the newspaper this evening, when something
    caught my eye... On the cover of the LA Times Extra section there appears to be
    a Thick-billed murre! It's in a story about the ongoing oil leakage around Santa
    Barbara, showing the murre in question being treated at a rehab center in San
    Pedro.Unless I'm seeing things... the photos of a murre getting washed down
    appears to be a Thick-billed. Pretty far south.
    
    The on-line story is at
    http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-oil-birds-20120307,0,3147878.story. The
    newspaper has an additional photo with a nice side profile not shown on the
    internet.
    
    
  16. -back to top-
  17. Mendocino pelagic birds WOW LINK
    DATE: May 17, 2010 @ 2:36pm, 8 year(s) ago
    We had an great day in the ocean off Ft. Bragg yesterday with Mendocino
    Audubon. Thanks to Karen Havlena for putting together this spring pelagic
    trip. The seas were calm and in the afternoon, flat as can be.
    
    Wow, the first birds we saw in the ocean was a pair of Craveri's Murrelets,
    well seen and photographed. This is an extraordinary record this far north
    and during spring. Hard to believe, but true. Later in the day, Todd
    Easterla spotted an alternate-plumaged Thick-billed Murre swimming with a
    Common Murre. Again, very well studied and photographed. I'll post photos
    on my website late this afternoon...after I photograph the Painted Redstart
    in Placer County!
    
    John Sterling
    
    VVVVVVVVVV
    
    26 Palm Ave
    
    Woodland, CA 95695
    
    cell 530 908-3836
    
    jsterling@...
    
    check out my photos at http://sterlingbirds.smugmug.com
    
    Birding Classes at
    http://www.sterlingbirds.com/birding_classes__yolo_basin.html
    
    www.sterlingbirds.com
    
    
  18. -back to top-
  19. Big Sur Christmas Count; 12.20.2009 LINK
    DATE: Oct 3, 2009 @ 7:28pm, 9 year(s) ago
    Greetings Birders
    
    
    
    The Big Sur Christmas Count will be held this year on Dec. 20, 2009. Our count
    circle includes some of the most breathtaking scenery in North America and is
    traditionally a very underbirded event. Territories stretch from the old growth
    Redwoods of Palo Colorado south toGrimes Canyon andfrom Pt. Sur and the Big
    Sur River Mouth east to the slopes of the Santa Lucias and Ventana Wilderness.
    Regular species include Mountain Quail, California Condor and California Spotted
    Owl.Pastraritieshave included Manx Shearwater, Thick-billed Murre, Townsend's
    Solitaire and Evening Grosbeak.
    
    
    
    Please contact me at this e-mail for more information or to participate.
    
    Good birding,
    
    
    
    Blake T. Matheson, Compiler
    
    Pacific Grove California & Portland Oregon
    
    "Men still live who, in their youth, remember Passenger Pigeons. Trees still
    live who, in their youth, were shaken by a living wind. But a decade hence only
    the oldest oaks will remember, and at long last only the hills will know."
    Leopold (1949).
    
    
  20. -back to top-
  21. Horned Puffin, Thick-billed Murre, Arctic Loon Sonoma County-Sea Ranch! LINK
    DATE: Jun 15, 2009 @ 7:11am, 9 year(s) ago
    Birders,
    
    Today, while on a short three day vacation, with my family at Sea Ranch, in
    coastal Northern Sonoma County, My self, Lisa Jorgensen, Tanner and Tayla
    Easterla were able to spot some pretty great birds. We positioned our selves on
    a high rocky point just behind our residence at Sea Ranch. This spot is about
    3-4 miles South of the Mendocino County line on private property.
    
    At about 8:45 Am we found a HORNED PUFFIN. This bird seemed to resemble, due to
    a smaller dark bill, a first year bird. We were able to obtain photographs
    (digiscope) of this nice bird.
    
    Shortly after this we found another rare first year alcid a THICK-BILLED MURRE.
    Photographs of this bird were also obtained.
    
    Thinking we had already had a great day (or hour) we stumbled upon another good
    bird an ARCTIC LOON! We were very thrilled to say the least to find all of these
    great birds with in a total of about an hour. It was also nice to be able to
    digi-scope all of these uncommon sea birds.
    
    The ocean was pretty calm most of the time we were surveying from our look out.
    We also had a hand full of Marlbled Murrletts, Rhino Auklets, hundreds of
    Pacific Loons, Common Loons, Common Murres, White-winged Scoters (2) and other
    more common sea-birds.
    
    Sorry I can not give you the exact location of these birds as it is on private
    property. I thought I should get the word out any ways, just in case any one is
    staying at Sea Ranch in the next few days.
    
    Todd Easterla
  22. -back to top-
  23. Again - Pelagic Trip for Feb 22 out of Fort Bragg, Mendocino County LINK
    DATE: Feb 12, 2009 @ 4:26pm, 9 year(s) ago
    To repeat, The Peregrine Audubon Society of Mendocino County has a
    scheduled PELAGIC TRIP for February 22nd (Sunday)out of Fort Bragg
    aboard the TREK II (Anchor Charters). The goal will be to get as far
    off shore as possible in search of birds and marine mammals. Cost per
    person is $99 with a $25 option to help support student (enrolled &
    over 18) participation. Student rate is $75. Reservations are based
    upon order of firm commitments and payment. Contact Bob Keiffer
    rjkeiffer@... ... for payment and trip details. There are
    about 8 spaces left.
    
    I would like to add that Noyo Harbor prices tend to be higher than
    Monterey or southern California harbors (Debi Shearwater found this
    out years ago). I have personally organized many pelagics out of Noyo
    in years past ... prior to the Shearwater Journeys trips. Keep in mind
    that Shearwater Journeys advertises many of the Fort Bragg summer/fall
    trips as possible "mega-rarity" trips. MEN has produced some great
    birds ... Shy Albatross, Streaked Shearwater, Hawaiian Petrels,
    Murphy's Petrels, thick-billed Murres and Manx Shearwaters during
    spring/summer/fall trips. Research Vessel trips in MEN waters have
    produced Masked Booby, Cook's Petrel, Red-tailed Triopicbird, and
    Parakeet Auklets. One past trip had 12 species of marine mammals.
    
    Our charter boat base price is $2100 for a full 8-hour day trip with
    an almost 100% guarantee of reaching deep waters (Noyo Canyon or
    Navarro Canyon) and many times venturing to 25 to 35 miles out. We
    will have local leaders/participants who know the expected local birds
    well. The charter boat is 52 feet long ...and 24 - 28 people makes for
    a comfortable trip (not too crowded). So, for the skeptics ... you
    do the math. We invite all to participate to share in the adventure
    and the excitement of the "unexpected" as there have been almost no
    winter pelagic trips in MEN waters prior to this one.
    
    PS ...if you want a whale-watching trip on other days, where the boat
    idles along about 1 mile offshore following gray whales, then Anchor
    Charters charges $35 per person (but you probably won't see any rare
    birds!)
    
    Bob Keiffer - Hopland (Mendocino County) rjkeiffer@...
  24. -back to top-
  25. Horned Puffins at Point Reyes today LINK
    DATE: Jun 10, 2007 @ 2:20am, 11 year(s) ago
    Hi All. This morning at about 9:30, Kathy and I saw 3 adult Horned
    Puffins about 1/4 mile west of Chimney Rock. The birds were about 150
    yards south of the cove containing the group of Elephant Seals which is
    below the "Dangerous Cliffs" sign along the trail to Chimney Rock. We
    did not see the Thick-billed Murre.
    
    We also saw 2 Eurasian Collared-Doves "courting" at the Fish Docks
    private residence.
    
    Dan Brown,
    Sacramento
  26. -back to top-
  27. Big Sur CBC results LINK
    DATE: Dec 18, 2006 @ 4:05am, 12 year(s) ago
    Hi Birders -
    
    Today's Big Sur CBC tallied many rarities, which is rare for this
    count. We blasted last year's total of 89 (think 7.5 inches of
    rain), but we don't know the exact total yet for today as one or two
    groups haven't reported yet. However, it was a phenomenal day!
    Rain, snow, hail, rainbows, sunshine.....we had it all. Here are the
    highlights:
    
    American Bittern
    Black-crowned Night-Heron
    Ross's Goose
    Crested Caracara
    Prairie Falcon
    Wilson's Snipe
    Black-legged Kittiwake
    Thick-billed Murre
    Eurasian Collared-Dove
    Red-naped Sapsucker
    Eastern Phoebe
    Northern Mockingbird
    Sage Thrasher
    White-throated Sparrow
    Slate-colored Junco
    Red Crossbill
    Evening Grosbeak
    
    Steve Rovell
    Marina, CA
  28. -back to top-
  29. Composite Report for Oct 6, 7, 8, & 9, 2006 Trips LINK
    DATE: Oct 12, 2006 @ 5:45am, 12 year(s) ago
    Hi, Birders,
    
    Following is a composite list of the species seen on Shearwater
    Journey's Oct 6, 7, 8, & 9 pelagic trips. The Oct 6 & 8th trips were
    the standard trips from Monterey, while Oct 7 was an offshore trip from
    Monterey, and Oct 9th was a trip from Bodega Bay. A few hardy souls
    participated on every trip, and they reaped their just rewards of a
    very hearty variety of seabirds and marine mammals.
    
    OCT 6/7/8/9, 2006
    
    RED-THROATED LOON-0/0/0/1
    PACIFIC LOON-0/0/0/1
    COMMON LOON-6/6/12/6
    RED-NECKED GREBE-0/0/0/3
    EARED GREBE-17/1/2/30
    WESTERN GREBE-6/0/1/2
    BLACK-FOOTED ALBATROSS-4/43/12/5
    NORTHERN FULMAR-5/21/12/42
    PINK-FOOTED SHEARWATER-71/1310/175/371
    FLESH-FOOTED SHEARWATER-0/9/1/8
    BULLER'S SHEARWATER-60/2750/325/300
    SOOTY SHEARWATER-50/173/50/20
    SHORT-TAILED SHEARWATER-1/1/0/0
    MANX SHEARWATER-1/1/1/0
    WILSON'S STORM-PETREL-0/0/0/1
    FORK-TAILED STORM-PETREL-0/0/01
    ASHY STORM-PETREL-12/274/20/195
    BLACK STORM-PETREL-0/22/2/0
    BROWN PELICAN-45/22/+/35
    BRANDT'S CORMORANT-300/200/300/1000+
    DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT-0/0/0/1
    PELAGIC CORMORANT-3/0/0/12
    HARLEQUIN DUCK-1/0/1/1
    SURF SCOTER-8/0/0/12
    BLACK SCOTER-0/0/0/2
    SCAUP sp.-0/0/0/12
    BLACK TURNSTONE-5/0/6/5
    RED-NECKED PHALAROPE-15/30/15/5
    RED PHALAROPE-0/1/0/0
    SOUTH POLAR SKUA-0/11/8/7
    POMARINE JAEGER-18/35/28/20+
    POMARINE/PARASITIC-0/1/2/1
    PARASITIC JAEGER-3/2/3/5
    PARASITIC/LONG-TAILED-0/0/0/1
    HEERMANN'S GULL-150/45/150/20
    RING-BILLED GULL-0/0/0/1
    CALIFORNIA GULL-50/1250/450/150
    HERRING GULL-0/0/0/4
    HERRING/GLAUCOUS-WINGED-0/0/0/2
    WESTERN GULL-300/270/250/300
    GLAUCOUS-WINGED GULL-0/0/0/1
    WESTERN/GLAUCOUS-WINGED-0/0/0/3
    SABINE'S GULL-0/2/1/0
    ELEGANT TERN-50/12/9/0
    CASPIAN TERN-0/0/0/1
    COMMON MURRE-150/27/85/300+
    MURRE sp.-0/0/0/1, under study for possible Thick-billed Murre
    PIGEON GUILLEMOT-3/0/3/4
    MARBLED MURRELET-8/0/0/0
    CASSIN'S AUKLET-3/2/0/4
    RHINOCEROS AUKLET-35/18/24/125
    TUFTED PUFFIN-0/0/0/2
    SEA OTTER-8/0/4/0
    CALIFORNIA SEA LION-200/450/300/40
    NORTHERN FUR SEAL-0/2/0/2
    NORTHERN ELEPHANT SEAL-0/1/0/0
    HARBOR SEAL-10/0/0/2
    HUMPBACK WHALE-5/10/2/6
    NORTHERN RIGHT WHALE DOLPHIN-200/800/500/300
    RISSO'S DOLPHIN-50/300/250/290
    PACIFIC WHITE-SIDED DOLPHIN-150/150/0/300
    DALL'S PORPOISE-8/6/0/4
    OCEAN SUNFISH-2/2/4/0
    BLUE SHARK-0/1/0/0
    
    Shearwaters forever,
    Debi
    
    Debra Love Shearwater
    Shearwater Journeys
    www.shearwaterjourneys.com
    debi@...
    PO Box 190
    Hollister, CA 95024 USA
    831/637-8527
    
    "Real birds eat squid."—Tony Marr
    
    
  30. -back to top-


-revision history-
v1.30 - 01/05/16 - Revamped cloud logic, optimized database queries, linked to eBird rarities.
v1.23 - 12/08/11 - Added direct link to CBRC records.
v1.22 - 12/03/11 - Corrected GMT offsets on dates. Added last 5 posts at top.
v1.21 - 11/24/11 - Added direct link to range map for NA birds.
v1.2  - 11/23/11 - Greatly improved graphing technology - separates month vs. year by posts. Added species auto-complete functionality.
v1.14 - 11/22/11 - Added cloud bubble for common thread topics.
v1.13 - 11/22/11 - Added integrated photos where available.
v1.12 - 11/22/11 - Added multiple input boxes for additional refinement, negative search criteria (eg. -keyword).
v1.11 - 11/22/11 - Added banding code, species look-up. Also direct link to recent eBird observations.
 v1.1 - 11/22/11 - Added 'date' functionality. Shows top 'month/year' combinations for a query. Restrict results to that 'month/year'.
 v1.0 - 11/21/11 - Initial version coded. Currently archiving 'lacobirds' and 'calbirds'.