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   Streaked Shearwater (Calonectris leucomelas) - STRS (recent eBird sightings, view CBRC records, range map
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  1. JOUANIN'S PETREL: A FIRST RECORD FOR NORTH AMERICA LINK
    DATE: Apr 11, 2018 @ 9:05pm, 13 day(s) ago
    Howdy, CalBirders,
    
    JOUANIN’S PETREL: FIRST NORTH AMERICAN RECORD:
    
    Today I learned that the “mystery” petrel briefly observed and photographed during the Saturday, September 12, 2015 Shearwater Journeys’ offshore albacore trip has been accepted by the California Bird Records Committee as a JOUANIN’S PETREL ( Bulweria fallax ). This record represents the first accepted record of this north-west Indian Ocean seabird for North America.
    
    This was a sold out trip accompanied by leaders: Scott Terrill, Linda Terrill, Alex Rinkert, Mary Gustafson, Rick Fournier, and Debi Shearwater. In addition, Will Brooks (a leader) was on board as a “regular” along with his father, Jim Brooks. Expert seabirder, Fabio Olmos from Brazil was on board, along with many keen local and out-of-state seabirders: Cooper Scallan, Doug Koch, Bryan Hix, Paul Fenwick, Chris Hartzell, Hillary White, Peder Svingen, Peter Haines, and others. Our captain this day was John Klusmire whose experience with Debi dates back to the mid-1980’s.
    
    Ace leader, Alex Rinkert, first spotted the petrel and called it a “Bulwer’s Petrel” from the stern of the boat which was a pretty darned good call. As the petrel circled the vessel toward the bow, Scott Terrill and I had a view as it crossed to the other side. However, having seen quite a few Bulwer’s Petrels (including the first record for North America on another of our Monterey Bay trips some years ago), I was immediately convinced that this bird was not a Bulwer’s Petrel, based on size alone. The sighting was in Santa Cruz County, based on using “nearest point of land” and at a depth of only 200 fathoms. This species occurs in shallow waters within its normal range.
    
    It should be noted that an extremely warm water “river” occurred along the north coast, off Santa Cruz and Half Moon Bay during this period. The presence of warm water by itself was not so much a factor, as the fact that it smashed into a front of significantly cold water. It was this frontal zone that produced the food for seabirds. (It’s all about food.) Indeed, only 3 days later, we found a WHITE-CHINNED PETREL on our September 15, 2015 Half Moon Bay trip. That petrel flew in and sat on the water for 45 minutes— birders seemed to become bored with it!
    
    Much discussion ensued following the sighting of the September 12 petrel. Eventually, Scott Terrill and I put together all of the details we could muster— including many (not-so-great) photos which became known as “the petrel package.” This was circulated to some of the top world seabirders. David Ainley, Peter Harrison and Hadoram Shirihai responded independently and immediately that they judged the petrel to be a JOUANIN’S PETREL!
    
    Finally, the package went to the CBRC and they made a concurring diagnosis. Of course, any first record for North America requires a laborious vetting, but especially so with seabirds which often present the most fleeting of views.
    
    So, although we had a very good number of images, I would not particularly call any of them “great.” I will try to put up a post on my blog with some of these images. I will post about that when it becomes available.
    
    Subsequent to our first record, nine months later (June 2016) a petrel captured during mist netting at Santa Cruz Island (southern California) was identified as a Jouanin’s Petrel. It may or may not have been the same individual we saw in September 2015.
    
    Jouanin’s Petrel occurs widely offshore in the Arabian Sea and Gulfs of Aden and Oman, where it is the commonest pelagic seabird. It has showed up as a vagrant off Australia, Kenya, Seychelles, Saudi Arabia, and other places. BirdLife lists this species as Near Threatened. There are about 4 records for Hawaii.
    
    If you’d like to read an interesting and fun tale about Jouanin’s Petrels, I recommend this article by my friend, Bob Flood:
    http://www.rarebirdalert.co.uk/v2/Content/Scilly_Pelagics_Jouanins_Petrels.aspxs_id=746315633
    
    HISTORY OF OFFSHORE MONTEREY ALBACORE TRIPS:
    
    The “albacore, offshore Monterey” pelagic trip was invented by Debi Shearwater back in 1983. During the 1980’s albacore, a type of tuna, regularly occurred off Monterey Bay. Reports from fishermen of incredible seabird activity prompted me to begin offering these 12 hour trips. The purpose of this trip was to present a wholistic approach to enjoying marine life. To that end, we endeavored to search for key seabirds, including Craveri’s, Scripps’s, and Guadalupe Murrelets; blue and Baird’s Beaked whales; and to catch albacore, the “cadillac” of the tunas. We never dreamed these trips would turn out to produce so many incredible seabird records. Even though the albacore changed their migration pattern and rarely occur off Monterey nowadays, we continue to operate albacore trips. These trips always sell out in advance.
    
    Other rare, or very uncommon seabirds we have discovered on Shearwater Journeys’ past albacore trips have included: Laysan Albatross; Cook’s and Hawaiian Petrels; Streaked, Flesh-footed, Greater, and Manx Shearwaters; Least and Leach’s Storm-Petrels; Red-billed and Red-tailed Tropicbirds; Brown Booby; Craveri’s, Scripps’s, and Guadalupe Murrelets. This is a spectacular trip for jaegers, often encountering over 100 in one day! We almost always have a “grand slam” on Pomarine, Parasitic, and Long-tailed Jaegers, Long-tailed being the most commonly sighted. It is the single best trip to see South Polar Skua.
    
    Our September 9, 2017 Albacore trip indeed found all of the jaegers, South Polar Skua; Guadalupe, Scripps’s, and Craveri’s Murrelets, and many of the “regular” fall species. Northern Waterthrush and American Redstart were “bonus” birds.
    
    OUR UPCOMING ALBACORE: OFFSHORE MONTEREY TRIPS:
    SUN. SEP. 9
    SAT. SEP. 15
    
    See our complete schedule for 2018:
    http://www.shearwaterjourneys.com/schedule.html
    
    Past trip reports:
    Oct. 6, 2001 with STREAKED SHEARWATER and Black-throated Gray Warbler:
    http://www.shearwaterjourneys.com/ag011006.html
    Sep. 15, 2002 with 42 LONG-TAILED JAEGERS and murrelets:
    http://www.shearwaterjourneys.com/020913.html
    Sep. 10, 2006 with ten FLESH-FOOTED SHEARWATERS and 1500+ Buller’s Shearwaters:
    http://www.shearwaterjourneys.com/ag060910.htm
    Sep. 13, 2008 with 7000 ASHY STORM-PETRELS:
    http://shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com/2008/09/shearwater-birthday-birding-sep-13-2008.html
    Sep. 12, 2009 with 24 COOK’S PETRELS and one HAWAIIAN PETREL:
    http://shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com/2009/09/trip-report-sep-12-2009-monterey.html
    
    I gratefully thank all of the leaders and especially, the participants from near and far —representing 14 different states in the USA and Canada and Brazil. Without you , the participants, we have nothing. Special thanks to the many photographers on board who sent their images, and to the reviewers who worked on this amazing record.
    
    Now check that box!
    What’s next
    Still discovering first North American records after 40 years of trips!
    Debi Shearwater
    
    DEBRA SHEARWATER
    Shearwater Journeys, Inc.
    PO Box 190
    Hollister, CA 95024
    831.637.8527
    debi@...
    www.shearwaterjourneys.com
    www.shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com
    
    Celebrating 43 Years of Seabirding with Shearwater Journeys
  2. -back to top-
  3. JOUANIN'S PETREL: A FIRST RECORD FOR NORTH AMERICA LINK
    DATE: Apr 11, 2018 @ 9:04pm, 13 day(s) ago
    Howdy, CalBirders,
    
    JOUANIN’S PETREL: FIRST NORTH AMERICAN RECORD:
    
    Today I learned that the “mystery” petrel briefly observed and photographed during the Saturday, September 12, 2015 Shearwater Journeys’ offshore albacore trip has been accepted by the California Bird Records Committee as a JOUANIN’S PETREL ( Bulweria fallax ). This record represents the first accepted record of this north-west Indian Ocean seabird for North America.
    
    This was a sold out trip accompanied by leaders: Scott Terrill, Linda Terrill, Alex Rinkert, Mary Gustafson, Rick Fournier, and Debi Shearwater. In addition, Will Brooks (a leader) was on board as a “regular” along with his father, Jim Brooks. Expert seabirder, Fabio Olmos from Brazil was on board, along with many keen local and out-of-state seabirders: Cooper Scallan, Doug Koch, Bryan Hix, Paul Fenwick, Chris Hartzell, Hillary White, Peder Svingen, Peter Haines, and others. Our captain this day was John Klusmire whose experience with Debi dates back to the mid-1980’s.
    
    Ace leader, Alex Rinkert, first spotted the petrel and called it a “Bulwer’s Petrel” from the stern of the boat which was a pretty darned good call. As the petrel circled the vessel toward the bow, Scott Terrill and I had a view as it crossed to the other side. However, having seen quite a few Bulwer’s Petrels (including the first record for North America on another of our Monterey Bay trips some years ago), I was immediately convinced that this bird was not a Bulwer’s Petrel, based on size alone. The sighting was in Santa Cruz County, based on using “nearest point of land” and at a depth of only 200 fathoms. This species occurs in shallow waters within its normal range.
    
    It should be noted that an extremely warm water “river” occurred along the north coast, off Santa Cruz and Half Moon Bay during this period. The presence of warm water by itself was not so much a factor, as the fact that it smashed into a front of significantly cold water. It was this frontal zone that produced the food for seabirds. (It’s all about food.) Indeed, only 3 days later, we found a WHITE-CHINNED PETREL on our September 15, 2015 Half Moon Bay trip. That petrel flew in and sat on the water for 45 minutes— birders seemed to become bored with it!
    
    Much discussion ensued following the sighting of the September 12 petrel. Eventually, Scott Terrill and I put together all of the details we could muster— including many (not-so-great) photos which became known as “the petrel package.” This was circulated to some of the top world seabirders. David Ainley, Peter Harrison and Hadoram Shirihai responded independently and immediately that they judged the petrel to be a JOUANIN’S PETREL!
    
    Finally, the package went to the CBRC and they made a concurring diagnosis. Of course, any first record for North America requires a laborious vetting, but especially so with seabirds which often present the most fleeting of views.
    
    So, although we had a very good number of images, I would not particularly call any of them “great.” I will try to put up a post on my blog with some of these images. I will post about that when it becomes available.
    
    Subsequent to our first record, nine months later (June 2016) a petrel captured during mist netting at Santa Cruz Island (southern California) was identified as a Jouanin’s Petrel. It may or may not have been the same individual we saw in September 2015.
    
    Jouanin’s Petrel occurs widely offshore in the Arabian Sea and Gulfs of Aden and Oman, where it is the commonest pelagic seabird. It has showed up as a vagrant off Australia, Kenya, Seychelles, Saudi Arabia, and other places. BirdLife lists this species as Near Threatened. There are about 4 records for Hawaii.
    
    If you’d like to read an interesting and fun tale about Jouanin’s Petrels, I recommend this article by my friend, Bob Flood:
    http://www.rarebirdalert.co.uk/v2/Content/Scilly_Pelagics_Jouanins_Petrels.aspxs_id=746315633
    
    HISTORY OF OFFSHORE MONTEREY ALBACORE TRIPS:
    
    The “albacore, offshore Monterey” pelagic trip was invented by Debi Shearwater back in 1983. During the 1980’s albacore, a type of tuna, regularly occurred off Monterey Bay. Reports from fishermen of incredible seabird activity prompted me to begin offering these 12 hour trips. The purpose of this trip was to present a wholistic approach to enjoying marine life. To that end, we endeavored to search for key seabirds, including Craveri’s, Scripps’s, and Guadalupe Murrelets; blue and Baird’s Beaked whales; and to catch albacore, the “cadillac” of the tunas. We never dreamed these trips would turn out to produce so many incredible seabird records. Even though the albacore changed their migration pattern and rarely occur off Monterey nowadays, we continue to operate albacore trips. These trips always sell out in advance.
    
    Other rare, or very uncommon seabirds we have discovered on Shearwater Journeys’ past albacore trips have included: Laysan Albatross; Cook’s and Hawaiian Petrels; Streaked, Flesh-footed, Greater, and Manx Shearwaters; Least and Leach’s Storm-Petrels; Red-billed and Red-tailed Tropicbirds; Brown Booby; Craveri’s, Scripps’s, and Guadalupe Murrelets. This is a spectacular trip for jaegers, often encountering over 100 in one day! We almost always have a “grand slam” on Pomarine, Parasitic, and Long-tailed Jaegers, Long-tailed being the most commonly sighted. It is the single best trip to see South Polar Skua.
    
    Our September 9, 2017 Albacore trip indeed found all of the jaegers, South Polar Skua; Guadalupe, Scripps’s, and Craveri’s Murrelets, and many of the “regular” fall species. Northern Waterthrush and American Redstart were “bonus” birds.
    
    OUR UPCOMING ALBACORE: OFFSHORE MONTEREY TRIPS:
    SUN. SEP. 9
    SAT. SEP. 15
    
    See our complete schedule for 2018:
    http://www.shearwaterjourneys.com/schedule.html
    
    Past trip reports:
    Oct. 6, 2001 with STREAKED SHEARWATER and Black-throated Gray Warbler:
    http://www.shearwaterjourneys.com/ag011006.html
    Sep. 15, 2002 with 42 LONG-TAILED JAEGERS and murrelets:
    http://www.shearwaterjourneys.com/020913.html
    Sep. 10, 2006 with ten FLESH-FOOTED SHEARWATERS and 1500+ Buller’s Shearwaters:
    http://www.shearwaterjourneys.com/ag060910.htm
    Sep. 13, 2008 with 7000 ASHY STORM-PETRELS:
    http://shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com/2008/09/shearwater-birthday-birding-sep-13-2008.html
    Sep. 12, 2009 with 24 COOK’S PETRELS and one HAWAIIAN PETREL:
    http://shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com/2009/09/trip-report-sep-12-2009-monterey.html
    
    I gratefully thank all of the leaders and especially, the participants from near and far —representing 14 different states in the USA and Canada and Brazil. Without you , the participants, we have nothing. Special thanks to the many photographers on board who sent their images, and to the reviewers who worked on this amazing record.
    
    Now check that box!
    What’s next
    Still discovering first North American records after 40 years of trips!
    Debi Shearwater
    
    DEBRA SHEARWATER
    Shearwater Journeys, Inc.
    PO Box 190
    Hollister, CA 95024
    831.637.8527
    debi@...
    www.shearwaterjourneys.com
    www.shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com
    
    Celebrating 43 Years of Seabirding with Shearwater Journeys
  4. -back to top-
  5. California RARE BIRD IMAGES. LINK
    DATE: Oct 30, 2015 @ 3:42pm, 2 year(s) ago
    Hi All,
    
    I have uploaded several species of mostly rare species of birds to my Fickr photo pages.
    
    Some of the species are of new sightings like GREAT SHEARWATER, FLESHFOOTED SHEARWATER, RED BILLED TROPICBIRD, CERULEAN WARBLER, PINE WARBLER and some older images of STREAKED SHEARWATER, WEDGETAILED SHEARWATER, ROSS'S GULL and others.
    
    Please let me know it the link below does not work as I have not tried it yet.
    
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/54192941@N07/
    
    Thanks and enjoy,
    Todd Easterla
    Fair Oaks, Ca.
    
    
  6. -back to top-
  7. What's Happening Offshore: Sep 6 & 8 LINK
    DATE: Sep 9, 2015 @ 10:04pm, 3 year(s) ago
    Howdy, CALBirders,
    On September 6, Shearwater Journeys had an offshore pelagic trip departing from Half Moon Bay. We spent the entire day in San Mateo County. Highlights included: LAYSAN ALBATROSS (1), BLACK-FOOTED ALBATROSS (21), PINK-FOOTED (356), BULLER'S (2), and SOOTY (54807) SHEARWATERS; a solitary FORK-TAILED STORM-PETREL put on a nice, close show; ARCTIC & COMMON TERNS; SOUTH POLAR SKUA; SABINE'S GULL; COMMON MURRE (999); MARBLED MURRELET (2). A dozen HUMPBACK WHALES, including a few just outside the harbor, 300 LONG-BEAKED COMMON DOLPHINS were present along with the usual pinnipeds.
    
    The real show stopper was something that very much confused me: something red sticking up in a pool of — red stuff which I spotted in our wake. This turned out to be the head of a young HARBOR SEAL! It was floating head down. So, the bit off end was the "red" floating thing. Recognizing that this was almost certainly a kill made by a GREAT WHITE SHARK, we did not approach the dead animal. Rather, we waited a fair amount of time, hoping the great white shark would return to the carcass. But, it did not. Oddly enough no birds were feeding or hovering over the carcass. So, we finally approached it, gaffed it, and sure enough, we could see teeth marks left on the body from the shark. It must have happened just as our boat was approaching it — for the carcass to end up in our wake. I imagine that the harbor seal was vertical in the water, as they usually are, and the shark simply came up from below (in which case we would never have seen it), and bit the thing in half! Astounding! I'll put images up on my blog when I have time.
    
    Good numbers of SOOTY SHEARWATERS were streaming along the shore, both in the morning and afternoon. Many people have commented on this event. The sooty shearwaters and common murres and humpback whales are feeding on nearshore schooling anchovies. There is a vast amount of warm water around, both El Nino and "the blob." SST (sea surface temperature) charts are showing cold water hugging the coastline near Half Moon Bay, Moss Landing, and in some areas south of Point Pinos on the Monterey Peninsula. However, there is a large body of cold water both nearshore and offshore Bodega Bay. As I indicated in my blog post, that is where the vast majority of these birds are, right now. Keep in mind that even though we are seeing large numbers of sooty shearwaters along the coast, their worldwide population has experienced vast and steep declines, by as much as 90% according to some experts. Sooty shearwaters are one of four species of declining shearwaters. The others include: flesh-footed, short-tailed, and streaked shearwaters. Blog post: http://shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com/2015/08/streaming-shearwaters-schooling-fish.html
    
    On September 8, Shearwater Journeys had a Monterey Bay pelagic trip. We spent time in both Monterey and Santa Cruz Counties. HIghlights included: BLACK-FOOTED ALBATROSS (30), PINK-FOOTED SHEARWATER (650), BULLER'S SHEARWATER (5), SOOTY SHEARWATER (3500- a decrease in total numbers), BLACK-VENTED SHEARWATER (75, an increase in numbers), ASHY STORM-PETREL (15); POMARINE, PARASITIC, and LONG-TAILED JAEGERS; SABINE'S GULLS; CASSIN'S and RHINOCEROS AUKLETS. Marine mammals included: two HUMPBACK WHALES feeding on anchovies just the other side of the Coast Guard Jetty! Up at Davenport, I spotted a solitary FIN WHALE that was likely feeding on schooling fish 400 feet deep in the water column. Throughout the day we had encounters with several groups of LONG-BEAKED COMMON DOLPHINS and RISSO'S DOLPHINS.
    
    Wildlife is shifting with the food supply. The general shift that I see is birds moving northward. Sooty shearwaters are moving north toward Bodega Bay. Increasing numbers of Black-vented shearwaters from the south have arrived in Monterey Bay today. Many were off Point Pinos this evening.
    
    There is an obvious die off of common murres, and many murres are hanging around both Monterey and Half Moon Bay harbors, some even on the jetties. I suspect that many, if not most of these murres will die. I saw many dead murres floating along Cannery Row, Monterey today. Also, I saw a good number of dead murres offshore. (Keep in mind that La Nina is already in the forecast for next year. So, murres will rebound).
    
    That's a bit of the latest news and updates. The marine life parade just continues to amaze me. Spaces are still available on many of our trips, including this week: September 8, 9, 10, 11, 13, 16, 25, 26, 27 and October 3 and 10 from Monterey. September 20 (limited number of spaces available) and October 4 and 11 from Half Moon Bay. I'm very much hoping for a real great white shark sighting on our October 18 trip departing from Sausalito to the Farallon Islands — the best place and best time of year for great whites. Spaces are filling up fast on that trip.
    
    Hope to see you out there!
    Living the Salt Life,
    Debi Shearwater
    
    DEBRA SHEARWATER
    Shearwater Journeys, Inc.
    PO Box 190
    Hollister, CA 95024
    831.637.8527
    debi@...
    www.shearwaterjourneys.com
    www.shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com
    
    Celebrating 40 Years of Seabirding with Shearwater Journeys
    
    
  8. -back to top-
  9. Predicted conditions - regarding offshore pelagics LINK
    DATE: May 14, 2015 @ 1:23pm, 3 year(s) ago
    Hi folks
    
      Todd mentioned warm water pushing closer to shore. Well, there is an interesting situation setting up in the Pacific. In March a record breaking reading of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Madden%E2%80%93Julian_oscillation) occurred. This was the strongest wave of tropical convection EVER detected in the Indian and Tropical Pacific. It spawned three cyclones, and shifted the wind patterns in a major way. The weak El Niño suddenly got a boost from an eastward moving Kelvin Wave (a slosh of warm water heading towards tropical America).
                    So in the tropical Pacific we are suddenly (in the last month or so) seeing a rapid intensifying of the El Niño. Unlike last year when an El Niño was predicted, but it came in late and weak. This year we are starting with the El Niño and it is suddenly rapidly getting stronger. Models have shifted and some are suggesting a Grande El Niño (El Niñazo!) could be in the works. The models can be wrong (as they were last year), but this year the measurements are going in the right direction. Essentially El Niño is a self-feeding type mechanism, so when it begins to strengthen it can snowball and sometimes rather quickly. When the big Niños happen, they slosh over to the north and affect waters in Baja and California. They also shift the wind patterns so upwelling can be shifted below normal levels.
                    The issue is that we already have warm water offshore, and the blob of warm water to the north of us. Winds have been good and at least here in central California, nearshore waters have cooled due to good upwelling and things look reasonably normal (water in the low 50s). I fear that it may be but a blip, and soon enough influence of the warm water slosh due to an intensifying El Niño could team up with the warm water offshore to create something pretty major. We shall see. Things look normal only nearshore and on the surface. Recently an unprecedented number of dead or dying Guadalupe Fur Seals have shown up in northern California – not good news. We have had 2-3 alone in Half Moon Bay. So things are not normal!
                    Point of the story is that it may indeed be a year when pelagic birding may be unique and memorable as Todd suggests. We may be hearing of some major die offs as well, particularly in the Humboldt Current. So good news for birders, bad news for some birds. I am going to be leading a trip on the Galapagos in August, that should be pretty awesome as far as seeing the effects of an El Niño, essentially at the epicenter of the whole thing. Like always, the predictions could be way off. But this month, folks are starting to shift their thoughts to an intensifying warm water event in the Pacific.
    
    See you offshore!
    Alvaro
    
    Alvaro Jaramillo
    alvaro@...
    www.alvarosadventures.com
    
    From: CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of toddamcgrath@... [CALBIRDS]Sent: Thursday, May 14, 2015 12:47 PMTo: CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.comSubject: [CALBIRDS] Deepwater Pelagic Trips
    
    Birders,
    
    Debi's brief history of pelagic birding at the Davidson Seamount highlights the long history of pelagic birding off the Central California Coast, and the challeneges of running trips a long distance offshore. In addtion to Debi's trips to Davidson, there have been numerous trips to Deepwater of Southern California on the Condor Express. Places like Arguello Canyon, The San Juan Seamount, and the Rodriquez Dome. These trips on the Condor Express were started by MItch Heindel, and I took over running them when he moved to TX. Coincidentally, I moved to TX, and handed the mantle over to Dave Pereksta. About that same time, the Condor Express business had a series of tragedies inlcuding the death of the owner, Fred Benko, and a fire at the dock that damaged the boat. As a result the trips have not been run the last few years. Dave had one set to go this Sunday, but was short participants (a shame as I think it would have been a good showing if the weather cooperated, and I was planning on coming out).
    
    The Spring trips on The Condor Express had some excellent results, including one trip with over 200 Cook's Petrels, multiple Murphy's, and a Hawaiian Petrel, plus regular Laysan Albatrosses and a couple of trips with Parakeet Auklets. Any deepwater day trip is only going to have a few hours in the right waters, so it was hit or miss, with some trips that were the stuff of legend, and some that were so-so.
    
    Like all Spring trips off CA, weather was often an issue. Too calm and no petrels, too rough and you can't get out. It wasn't often when the conditons were "just right".
    
    Hopefully Dave will continue the trips, and they will be better attended. I have not done one of the cruise ships yet, but I don't think I would get the same thrill watching these birds from 4 stories up through a scope.
    
    I have no evidence to support this, but if warm oceanic water is pushing closer to shore, it could be that Cook's Petrels will also put in an appearancecloser to shore like they did a few years ago. Seeing 100+ on a regular Monterey Bay trip was one my favorite trips with Debi, along with the one that saw the Great-winged Petrel, and the two that saw the Streaked Shearwater, and the one that had the Shy Alabtross and Long-billed Murrelet, and the one..........Well let's jsut say it was in the top 50.
    
    Todd
    
    
  10. -back to top-
  11. Deepwater Pelagic Trips LINK
    DATE: May 14, 2015 @ 12:47pm, 3 year(s) ago
     Birders,
    
    Debi's brief history of pelagic birding at the Davidson Seamount highlights the long history of pelagic birding off the Central California Coast, and the challeneges of running trips a long distance offshore. In addtion to Debi's trips to Davidson, there have been numerous trips to Deepwater of Southern California on the Condor Express. Places like Arguello Canyon, The San Juan Seamount, and the Rodriquez Dome. These trips on the Condor Express were started by MItch Heindel, and I took over running them when he moved to TX. Coincidentally, I moved to TX, and handed the mantle over to Dave Pereksta. About that same time, the Condor Express business had a series of tragedies inlcuding the death of the owner, Fred Benko, and a fire at the dock that damaged the boat. As a result the trips have not been run the last few years. Dave had one set to go this Sunday, but was short participants (a shame as I think it would have been a good showing if the weather cooperated, and I was planning on coming out).
    
    The Spring trips on The Condor Express had some excellent results, including one trip with over 200 Cook's Petrels, multiple Murphy's, and a Hawaiian Petrel, plus regular Laysan Albatrosses and a couple of trips with Parakeet Auklets. Any deepwater day trip is only going to have a few hours in the right waters, so it was hit or miss, with some trips that were the stuff of legend, and some that were so-so.
    
    Like all Spring trips off CA, weather was often an issue. Too calm and no petrels, too rough and you can't get out. It wasn't often when the conditons were "just right".
    
    Hopefully Dave will continue the trips, and they will be better attended. I have not done one of the cruise ships yet, but I don't think I would get the same thrill watching these birds from 4 stories up through a scope.
    
    I have no evidence to support this, but if warm oceanic water is pushing closer to shore, it could be that Cook's Petrels will also put in an appearancecloser to shore like they did a few years ago. Seeing 100+ on a regular Monterey Bay trip was one my favorite trips with Debi, along with the one that saw the Great-winged Petrel, and the two that saw the Streaked Shearwater, and the one that had the Shy Alabtross and Long-billed Murrelet, and the one..........Well let's jsut say it was in the top 50.
    
    Todd
    
    
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  13. RFI: SEP 21 HMB PELAGIC TRIP LINK
    DATE: Sep 23, 2014 @ 9:41am, 4 year(s) ago
    Howdy, CALBirders,
    This is a a Request for Images, if you were on board the Shearwater Journeys's September 21 pelagic trip departing from Half Moon Bay.
    
    A shearwater was discussed by some of the leaders. It was decided that the bird in question was a "weird" pink-footed shearwater. However, one image emerged late last night of a bird showing the head and face pattern of a streaked shearwater.
    
    If you were on this trip and shot images, please comb them carefully prior to hitting "delete." I would appreciate receiving any such images. Email: debi@...
    
    Many thanks to the folks who joined us on this day.
    
    Living the Salt Life,
    Debi Shearwater
    
    DEBRA SHEARWATER
    Shearwater Journeys, Inc.
    PO Box 190
    Hollister, CA 95024
    831.637.8527
    debi@...
    www.shearwaterjourneys.com
    www.shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com
    
    
  14. -back to top-
  15. Monterey Seabirds Oct. 12 Pelagic Trip LINK
    DATE: Dec 31, 1969 @ 4:00pm, TODAY
    Hello Seabirders,Just a brief announcement to say that we still have spaces available on our annual Monterey Seabirds' Streaked Shearwater Trip this weekend--October 12th. 
    A
    great shearwater was just reported and Manx, black-vented and
    flesh-footed shearwaters are still around too, so please join us for
    great
    birds on what has proven to be one of the best years ever to enjoy
    nature's great spectacle on the Monterey bay. 
    You can register online at www.montereyseabirds.com or by calling 831-375-4658.
    
    Cheers,Tim Amaral
    Trip LeaderMonterey SeabirdsEnjoy the friendliest pelagic trips on the West Coast!
    www.montereyseabirds.com(831) 375-4658
    
    
  16. -back to top-
  17. Sep 21 deepwater pelagic on The Condor Express LINK
    DATE: Aug 14, 2013 @ 3:21pm, 5 year(s) ago
    Hi all
    
    If
    you want to get out to offshore waters beyond the reach of most day
    trips and have a chance to see a number of outstanding pelagic birds and
    marine mammals, the newly renovated Condor Express has a 12 to 14-hour
    deepwater pelagic trip scheduled for September 21 out of the Santa Barbara
    Harbor.  Plenty of space is
    still available for this trip, which has had outstanding results in past years.
    
    This trip gives us the opportunity to get far offshore of
    southern California and spend time in places that most one-day trips
    can only search briefly, if they can get there at all.  If sea
    conditions permit, we generally get beyond the islands to destinations
    like the Rodriguez Seamount, San Juan Seamount, the Patton Escarpment, and
    several banks and trenches that have
    produced a spectacular variety of marine birds and mammals.  We will
    decide what our offshore destinations will be after reviewing
    oceanographic conditions at the time of the trip, which will help
    determine where birds and other marine life may be present and/or
    concentrated.  If sea conditions prevent us from getting to some of
    these locations, we will get as far offshore as we can to places where we
    have found great birds.  We intend to check the waters around and
    between the northern Channel Islands on our way out or on our return (depending
    on our course for the day) because during the fall, hundreds (sometimes
    thousands) of shearwaters crowd into the inter-island gaps.  We will be looking
    through flocks of Pink-footed and Sooty Shearwaters for such sought-after
    species as Buller's, Flesh-footed (uncommon), and Manx (rare) Shearwaters.  In
    September 2002, we had the only accepted record of Streaked Shearwater for
    southern California just south of the Anacapa-Santa Cruz Island gap so anything
    is possible.  Currently, there are tens of thousands of shearwaters in the Santa
    Barbara Channel so if they stick around we will have lots of birds to look
    through.
    
    In addition to shearwaters, this is peak season for seabird diversity.  We will
    be looking for
    storm-petrels (Black and Ashy are both likely and are currently around in
    numbers; Leach's and Least are
    rare but possible); alcids such as Cassin's and Rhinoceros Auklets, Guadalupe
    Murrelet, and Craveri's Murrelet (remote chance); and a variety of other
    seabirds including Black-footed Albatross and Red-billed Tropicbird.  It is a
    good time of year for South Polar Skua and jaegers, and Sabine's Gull and Arctic
    Tern are possible.  In 2009, a Blue-footed Booby and Brown Booby were seen well
    by all aboard!
    
    The
    Condor Express is a fast stable Catamaran with a large comfortable
    cabin, full galley (the food is great!), and great viewing from the two
    decks.  This boat can catch up to those elusive seabirds and was
    designed for watching marine wildlife.  The Captain and crew run lots of
    pelagic birding and whale watching trips so they now how to find the
    birds, get us close to them, and work for the best possible position for
    photographs.
    
     
    We never know what we will find out there, but there are a number of exciting
    possibilities.
    
    The
    cost for the trip is $195.  We depart Santa Barbara promptly at 7:00
    AM, so please arrive by 6:30 AM to facilitate check-in and loading.
    
    Call the Sealanding at 888-77WHALE or 805-882-0088 to reserve your spot.  I look
    forward to seeing you on-board in September.
    
     
    See www.socalbirding.com for the trip write-ups and reports from previous
    years.  We are also hoping to announce other upcoming fall trips out of Ventura
    (Oct) and Santa Barbara (Nov) in the coming weeks.
     
    Dave Pereksta
    Ventura
    
    
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  19. RE: [CALBIRDS] Monterey Seabirds Sunday LINK
    DATE: Sep 28, 2012 @ 3:30pm, 6 year(s) ago
    Pelagifiles,
    
    Sunday come out with us on Monterey Seabirds for a great day of seabirding
    and fun!! This is a great trip for photographers at a great price. This is
    one of the best times of year for some of the really good stuff to show up.
    You won't regret going out with a bunch of friendly birders who just want to
    show you a good time.
    
    http://www.montereyseabirds.com
    
    Todd Easterla
    
    From: CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
    Of Roger Wolfe
    Sent: Thursday, September 27, 2012 5:41 AM
    To: CALBIRDS
    Subject: [CALBIRDS] Monterey Seabirds Sunday
    
    Ahoy Birders,
    
    Monterey Seabirds will be venturing out again this Sunday and we will
    have the keen eyes of Todd Easterla on board. He's spotted some great
    birds this time of year like the STREAKED SHEARWATERS we saw in both
    2007 and 2008.
    
    Last Sunday we made it offshore into some warmer water where we saw
    albacore jumping and found a few SCRIPPS'S MURRELETS. We also saw 5
    species of shearwater with a FLESH-FOOTED and a BLACK-VENTED SHEARWATER.
    The Skua slam was achieved when a LONG-TAILED JAEGER flew up to back of
    the boat and tried to grab and anchovy from our chummer.
    
    There are many spaces available thus lots of room for you photographers.
    Cost is $130 pp. Call 831 375 4658 or register online at
    http://www.montereyseabirds.com
    
    Hope you can make it!
    Roger Wolfe
    Soquel Canyon
    
    
  20. -back to top-
  21. Monterey Seabirds Sunday LINK
    DATE: Sep 27, 2012 @ 12:41pm, 6 year(s) ago
    Ahoy Birders,
    
    Monterey Seabirds will be venturing out again this Sunday and we will
    have the keen eyes of Todd Easterla on board. He's spotted some great
    birds this time of year like the STREAKED SHEARWATERS we saw in both
    2007 and 2008.
    
    Last Sunday we made it offshore into some warmer water where we saw
    albacore jumping and found a few SCRIPPS'S MURRELETS. We also saw 5
    species of shearwater with a FLESH-FOOTED and a BLACK-VENTED SHEARWATER.
    The Skua slam was achieved when a LONG-TAILED JAEGER flew up to back of
    the boat and tried to grab and anchovy from our chummer.
    
    There are many spaces available thus lots of room for you photographers.
    Cost is $130 pp. Call 831 375 4658 or register online at
    http://www.montereyseabirds.com
    
    Hope you can make it!
    Roger Wolfe
    Soquel Canyon
  22. -back to top-
  23. Where is everyone? LINK
    DATE: Oct 13, 2011 @ 12:19pm, 7 year(s) ago
    Trust me I don't like having to make these appeals to get people signed
    up for Monterey Seabirds trips.
    
    We've got a trip going out this Saturday, Oct. 15 and right now we have
    as many spotters coming as we do participants. You see all the leaders
    on our team know that mid October is when you want to get out on the
    ocean to find the megararities. We had to cancel our trip that was
    supposed to go out last Sunday because we had only 5 people signed up.
    
    But we are going to head out to sea this Saturday and take a financial
    hit if need be. Conditions are just too good to pass up. A look at the
    sea surface temperature map indicates that there is a temperature break
    that is reachable off Pt. Sur at Sur Ridge. These temp breaks are what
    we refer to as the albacore grounds and are typically only within reach
    on extended 12 hour trips. Interesting seabirds can be found along these
    temp. breaks.
    
    Big Sur is really dramatic when viewed from 20 miles out. On the way
    back in we will make a close pass by Pt. Lobos which also looks quite
    striking when seen from the ocean. The weather forecast looks promising
    for calm conditions with very little swell.
    
    I have been lucky enough to see 4 different STREAKED SHEARWATERS out of
    Monterey and three of those were found on the mid-October trips.
    
    Richard Ternullo and I would like to keep doing these Monterey Seabirds
    trips but if we can't get birders to sign up for the trips what are we
    to do Cost is $120 per person.
    
    Call 831 375 4658 to reserve or do it online at
    http://www.montereyseabirds.com
    
    Roger over and out
    Soquel
  24. -back to top-
  25. Monterey Seabirds trip reports LINK
    DATE: Oct 5, 2011 @ 10:08pm, 7 year(s) ago
    The highlight of the Monterey Seabirds Oct. 1st charter was the sighting
    of a very large adult bull SPERM WHALE outside of Carmel Bay on the way
    back to the harbor from Sur Ridge. We are waiting for the only decent
    photos and I will post them when I get them.
    
    Avian highlights were many XANTUS'S MURRELETS and a single FLESH-FOOTED
    SHEARWATER.
    
    That trip report featuring text and photos by Blake Matheson and Wendy
    Naruo can be found here:
    http://montereyseabirding.blogspot.com/2011/10/1-trip-report-xantuss-murrelet-an
    d.html
    
    Trip reports the last two Sept. trips featuring Martijn Verdoes and
    Wendy Naruo photos are also up on the Monterey Seabirding blog:
    http://montereyseabirding.blogspot.com/2011/10/sept-17-trip-report.html
    http://montereyseabirding.blogspot.com/2011/10/sept-10-trip-report.html
    
    We've got trips on the schedule for October on the 15th, 23rd and 29th.
    Monterey Seabirds has found STREAKED SHEARWATERS on 3 out of our last 5
    mid-October outings. Todd Easterla is planning on being on all these trips.
    
    Call 831 375-4658 to reserve or you can do online registration on the
    website: http://www.montereyseabirds.com
    
    Roger that
    Soquel Canyon
  26. -back to top-
  27. FW: [CALBIRDS] Pelagic sightings (Streaked Shearwater, etc.) on behalf of Jay Withgott LINK
    DATE: Oct 1, 2011 @ 1:58pm, 7 year(s) ago
    From: Eugene and Nancy Hunn [mailto:enhunn323@...]
    Sent: Thursday, September 29, 2011 6:28 PM
    To: 'Kimball Garrett'; 'calbirds@yahoogroups.com'
    Cc: 'Mike Parmeter'
    Subject: RE: [CALBIRDS] Pelagic sightings (Streaked Shearwater, etc.) on
    behalf of Jay Withgott
    
    By my calculations using Google Earth, the Streaked Shearwater was 41.08
    miles from Pt. Reyes light and 42.07 miles from Bodega Head, thus in Marin
    County.
    
    Gene Hunn
    
    Petaluma, CA
    
    From: CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
    Of Kimball Garrett
    Sent: Thursday, September 29, 2011 11:03 AM
    To: calbirds@yahoogroups.com
    Subject: [CALBIRDS] Pelagic sightings (Streaked Shearwater, etc.) on behalf
    of Jay Withgott
    
    The following is from Jay Withgott (Oregon) who is not on this list
    serve - it should be of interest to CA seabirders.
    
    Hello Cal Birders --
    
    A group of 11 birders from 3 states has just completed a pelagic birding
    trip on the cruiseship Golden Princess, from Vancouver to Los Angeles,
    25-28 Sept. The following three highlights occurred on 27 September in
    California waters:
    
    * STREAKED SHEARWATER: 1 bird seen at close range by 4 of our group
    about 45 miles west of Pt. Reyes at 38 02 27 N, 123 46 32 W. This would
    put the bird either in Sonoma Co. or Marin Co. waters (I'm currently
    still traveling and unable to make exact measurements to determine
    county placement.)
    
    * RED-BILLED TROPICBIRD: 1 adult seen by all 10 of our group present at
    the time at a moderate-to-far distance for nearly 2 minutes in steady
    flight. This bird was about 48 miles west of the Monterey Peninsula, at
    36 34 30 N, 122 49 25 W, which would put it either in Monterey Co. or
    Santa Cruz Co. waters (as with the shearwater, very near the county line
    as determined by closest point of land). Photos of the Tropicbird were
    taken by Owen Schmidt and may be viewed at:
    http://web.me.com/olschmidt/AVES/Tropicbird.html
    
    * COOK'S PETREL: 1 bird seen at a great distance but exhibiting
    distinctive field marks and behavior, about 50 miles west of the
    Monterey Co. coastline between Carmel and Pt. Sur, in Monterey Co.
    waters, at 36 25 24 N, 122 43 34 W.
    
    Also seeming unusual to us were 3 White-faced Ibis flying over the ocean
    a good 20 miles out from the Palos Verdes peninsula, L.A. Co., on 28
    Sept.
    
    These sightings capped a trip in which the ship plowed through
    gale-force winds and 16-foot seas off WA and OR, in which we largely
    lost a morning in CA to fog, and in which the afternoon in CA saw
    numbers of seabirds that were markedly lower than previous cruiseship
    pelagic trips we have done at this time of year in these waters.
    
    Anyone interested in our entire list may contact me
    (withgott@... ), and I will send it
    along in several days upon my
    return home.
    
    Observers on the ship were: Jeff Gilligan, Tim Janzen, Rachel Janzen,
    Gerard Lillie, Judy Meredith, Owen Schmidt, Jay Withgott, and Sheran
    Wright, all of Oregon; Catherine Waters and Robert Waters of California;
    and Ron Martin of North Dakota.
    
    Jay Withgott
    Portland, OR
    withgott@...
    
    Forwarded by:
    
    Kimball L. Garrett
    
    Ornithology Collections Manager
    
    Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County
    
    900 Exposition Blvd.
    
    Los Angeles, CA 90007 USA
    
    213-763-3368
    
    kgarrett@...
    
    http://www.nhm.org/site/research-collections/ornithology
    
    
  28. -back to top-
  29. MONTEREY SEABIRD PELAGICS in OCTOBER LINK
    DATE: Sep 30, 2011 @ 1:45pm, 7 year(s) ago
    Seabirders,
    
    MONTEREY SEABIRDS has several pelagic trips in October. This is one of my
    favorite times to be out on the ocean because it is great for seeing a variety
    of sea-birds, as well as we have a good chance to see unusual passerines.
    October is one of the best times for opportunities to see Streaked Shearwater
    (October has multiple sightings of this species), as well as Great shearwater,
    Wedge-tailed Shearwater and Great-winged Petrel. For example, a Streaked
    Shearwater was just reported by reliable observers just off the Marin/Sonoma
    County waters only a couple days ago. This may be a "good sign" as Marin is not
    too far as the shearwater flys.
    
    Also, this is one of the best times of the year to be looking through Storm
    Petrel flocks (by now there numbers are increasing). These trips in October are
    some of the last opportunities to take a trip out – before the seabird season
    starts to slow down more, and the seas start to get more unstable.
    So come on out with a friendly crew and have fun while we look for unusual
    seabirds, whales and other pelagic life. October is a great month to find just
    about anything!
    
    Monterey Seabirds will be running all day pelagic trips coming up in October on
    Sundays the 9th and 29th, as well as Saturday October 15
    Cost for these trips is $120 and there are spaces available on each trip in
    October.
    
    You can reserve a spot online at http://www.montereyseabirds.com or over the
    phone by calling 831- 375-4658.
    
    Todd Easterla ……AKA "Tubenose Todd" …smelling our way to the good stuff in
    OCTOBER!
  30. -back to top-


-revision history-
v1.30 - 01/05/16 - Revamped cloud logic, optimized database queries, linked to eBird rarities.
v1.23 - 12/08/11 - Added direct link to CBRC records.
v1.22 - 12/03/11 - Corrected GMT offsets on dates. Added last 5 posts at top.
v1.21 - 11/24/11 - Added direct link to range map for NA birds.
v1.2  - 11/23/11 - Greatly improved graphing technology - separates month vs. year by posts. Added species auto-complete functionality.
v1.14 - 11/22/11 - Added cloud bubble for common thread topics.
v1.13 - 11/22/11 - Added integrated photos where available.
v1.12 - 11/22/11 - Added multiple input boxes for additional refinement, negative search criteria (eg. -keyword).
v1.11 - 11/22/11 - Added banding code, species look-up. Also direct link to recent eBird observations.
 v1.1 - 11/22/11 - Added 'date' functionality. Shows top 'month/year' combinations for a query. Restrict results to that 'month/year'.
 v1.0 - 11/21/11 - Initial version coded. Currently archiving 'lacobirds' and 'calbirds'.