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   South Polar Skua
South Polar Skua
Stercorarius maccormicki


   South Polar Skua (Stercorarius maccormicki) - SPSK (recent eBird sightings, view CBRC records, range map
)

  1. Laysan Albatross - Half Moon Bay pelagic. LINK
    DATE: Sep 14, 2018 @ 10:46am, 5 day(s) ago
    Hello all, Great boat trip yesterday out of Half Moon Bay, it started off slowly but built up to a nice finish. We covered water in San Mateo and San Francisco counties. The highlight was a Laysan Albatross with orange-red band (presumably from Mexican breeding population), it was feeding on a big dead Humboldt Squid! We also found a near adult Brown Booby. Both of these birds were in San Mateo. A South Polar Skua, all three species of jaegers, as well as the regularly occurring shearwaters (Sooty, Pink-footed and Bullers), Black-footed Albatross, and alcids (Rhinoceros Auklet, Common Murre, as well as Marbled Murrelet). Both Arctic and Common terns were found, but only a single Sabines Gull. We did find small flocks of Ashy Storm-Petrel, and a single Fork-tailed but no Black SP yesterday. Blue Whale was great to see. We are looking forward to our trips this weekend, there is room on tomorrow and Sundays boat. http://alvarosadventures.com/boat-trips/pelagics/ Good birding Alvaro Alvaro Jaramillo alvaro@... www.alvarosadventures.com 
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  3. Searcher Pelagic Results LINK
    DATE: Sep 7, 2018 @ 10:35pm, 12 day(s) ago
    Birders,
    The annual Searcher pelagic trip departed San Diego about noon on Labor Day and was back to the dock Friday morning at 730 AM. Highlights were many. Monday afternoon was spent crossing the 9 mile bank and working our way up the 30 mile. Highlights were excellent looks at a couple of Brown Boobies as well as close passes by a RED-FOOTED BOOBY. Ashy, Black, and Leach's Storm-Petrels, plus a few leaders and participants were able to glimpse and photo one or two LEAST STORM_PETRELS along the way.
    We decided to start day 2 at Santa Barbara Island where we saw the continuing immature NAZCA BOOBY plus about 80 Brown Boobies. From Santa Barbara we worked our way northwest along the Santa Cruz basin, seeing good numbers of Pomarine and Long-tailed Jaegers, Arctic Terns, as well as the expected shearwater species. We were treated to another RED-FOOTED BOOBY not too far from SB Island. In the late afternoon we arrived at a bank south east of San Miguel Island called "The Condor Bank" as it was a fishing spot frequented by the original Condor board from Santa Barbara. Here we encountered large boils of 200lb Bluefin Tuna, and the bird show was spectacular. Several South Polar Skuas, a dozen jaegers, many hundreds of Pink-footed Shearwaters and likely a hundred Arctic Terns. The show was spectacular, and here we found yet another immature NAZCA BOOBY and a couple of Brown Boobies.
    After anchoring near San Miguel for the night, DAY 3 we headed out to The Rodriguez Dome about 30 miles to the west. We departed Miguel about 5 AM, and were on the dome about 730 AM. Just before arriving at Rodriguez we encountered yet another immature NAZCA BOOBY. Exceptional numbers of Buller's Shearwaters, 8 Guadalupe Murrelets (seen well by all onboard) as well as our first Red-billed Tropicbird of the trip were highlights of our day headed south. We had as many as 10 Black-footed Albatross with us at once, and there were several behind the boarWe finished the day at the San Juan Seamount. We encountered dozens of Blue Whales in this deep water as well as some Fin whales, and a couple of cooperative BAIRD"S-BEAKED Whales. Guadalupe Fur Seals were seen regularly. Our first TOWNSEND"S STORM-PETRELS
    DAY 4 was spent traveling traveling from the western edge of the Tanner and Cortez Banks to the San Clemente Island basin. We found a cooperative RED-BILLED TROPICBIRD on the water, as well our first of nearly a dozen COOK'S PETRELS. Leach's Storm-petrels were present in numbers, and we were able to get folks on a handful of TOWNSEND's Storm-Petrels. Inside the Cortez we had the familiar cry of "White Booby behind the boat", and had an immature booby circle the boat. This one seemed to show characters of MASKED BOOBY, but this bird was not as straightforward as the others, so we will be sending photos out to get some expert opinions before putting this one in the books.
    As we approached Sam Clemente we were treated to one of the most spectacular afternoons I have ever spent at sea. Boils of smaller bluefin tuna were everywhere, and there were literally thousands of Pink-footed Shearwaters wheeling about, as well as. hundreds of Arctic and Common Terns, dozens of Sabine's gulls and jaegers were in flight. We also saw about 35 Craveri's Murrelets in this area, some very close to the boat allowing great looks. We poked through flock after flock of birds until dark, eventually getting brief looks at a FLESH_FOOTED SHEARWATER. In the middle of this feeding frenzy we also saw yet another NAZCA BOOBY, this one a full adult.
    The high overcast conditions were also good for migrants, and we had Willow Flycatcher, Macgillvray'a Warbler as well as Orange-crowned, Townsend's, Black-throated Gray as well as multiple cowbirds and several species of shorebird.
    One of the best trips I have done off SoCal and certainly continues the excellent results this year. Thanks to Celia Condit and Captain Art Taylor from Searcher Natural History Tours, my co-leaders Dave Pereksta, Dave Povey, and Rob Hynson. Thanks to all the participants as well.
    Todd McGrath SKUA@... The Woodlands, TX
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  5. San Diego pelagic: LAYSAN, 2 new RED-FOOTED & new MASKED Boobies, 12 Craveri's, S.P. Skua, B-f Albatross LINK
    DATE: Aug 20, 2018 @ 5:42am, 31 day(s) ago
    The 12-hour pelagic trip from San Diego on Sunday, 19 August, out as far
    
    as the 30-Mile Bank aboard GRANDE and sponsored by Buena Vista Audubon
    
    Society was wildly successful for quality birds. Best for San Diego
    
    waters was the LAYSAN ALBATROSS that plopped down near the boat only
    
    10.5 nm WSW of Sunset Cliffs (Point Loma), on our way back in. Before
    
    that, the best birds had been yet another, new RED-FOOTED BOOBY 24.4 nm
    
    WSW of La Jolla, also sitting on the water near the boat, and a close
    
    fly-by sub-adult MASKED BOOBY at the "182" site on the 30-Mile Bank.
    
    (Both of these birds were recognizably DIFFERENT from the ones we saw in
    
    the same general waters just two days earlier!!) At the end of the day,
    
    we heard that yet another RED-FOOTED BOOBY was riding along on another
    
    fishing boat, so we met that boat at the mouth of the bay and enjoyed
    
    following that bird back to the dock! Combined with the 3 BROWN BOOBIES
    
    seen, we had a three-booby day. A BLACK-FOOTED ALBATROSS made repeated
    
    passes close to the boat out at the 30-Mile, where there was also a
    
    distant SOUTH POLAR SKUA. And a total of 12 (6 pairs) of flighty
    
    CRAVERI'S MURRELETS were tallied, all well offshore. A BLACK TERN was
    
    seen by some, as was a WHITE-WINGED DOVE as we left the dock in the
    
    early morning. Photos of many of these birds will undoubtedly be posted
    
    by others. Offshore totals for the trip included:
    
    LAYSAN ALBATROSS: 1
    
    BLACK-FOOTED ALBATROSS: 1
    
    Pink-footed Shearwater: 90
    
    Sooty Shearwater: 2
    
    Black-vented Shearwater: 300
    
    Black Storm-Petrel: 350
    
    Ashy Storm-Petrel: 4
    
    Leach's Storm-Petrel: 15 (high)
    
    Least Storm-Petrel: 0 (a couple "maybe's" that were not seen well
    
    enough or photo'd)
    
    MASKED BOOBY: 1
    
    Brown Booby: 3
    
    RED-FOOTED BOOBY: 2
    
    Red-necked Phalarope: 50
    
    Red Phalarope: 200
    
    Pomarine Jaeger: 5
    
    Parasitic Jaeger: 2
    
    Long-tailed Jaeger: 1
    
    CRAVERI'S MURRELET: 12
    
    Cassin's Auklet: 6
    
    Sabine's Gull: 10
    
    BLACK TERN: 1
    
    WHITE-WINGED DOVE: 1
    
    Blue Whale: 1
    
    The next San Diego pelagic trips are scheduled for 23 September and 21
    
    October. See sandiegopelagics.com for more information.
    
    --Paul Lehman and leader contingent, San Diego
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  7. Farallons trip report - Horned Puffin and more. LINK
    DATE: Aug 16, 2018 @ 10:17am, 34 day(s) ago
    Calbirders A late report of our double header to the Farallon Islands this weekend, out of Half Moon Bay. Saturday was sunny, Sunday foggy and a bit choppier. On Saturday we happened to luck out on the arrival day of a female Brown Booby, the first which has been on the Farallons this season, this bird was also there on Sunday. The Northern Gannet was seen on both days as we moved north along the coast, on Egg Rock (Devils Slide). The big highlight on Saturday was youth birder Jonah Benningfield spotting an adult Horned Puffin, which we were able to see flying around and then swimming. We were able to communicate the sighting to the biologists on the island, and they were real happy as it was a lifer for some of the team. The bird was not there on Sunday, and I have heard of no positive reports since then. On Sunday a Scrippss Murrelet was the 8 th alcid species for us this weekend, Marbled Murrelets near shore have been reliable this year. Interestingly, yesterday we spotted a Scrippss Murrelet in Pillar Point Harbor, the first anyone can recall around here from land. Given how reliable this species has been here this season thus far, and this land based observation, I do wonder if they are being pushed in higher numbers out our way this year, and if some food issue may be happening Ashy Storm-Petrels were found in a nice concentration near the island, with a couple of Fork-tailed Storm-Petrels. Good numbers of shearwaters, phalaropes, and Black-footed Albatross on both trips. The Northern Fulmar numbers continue to be higher than usual. All three jaegers were found during the weekend, as well as a nice South Polar Skua on the Sunday. Note that Farallon biologists saw a Hawaiian Petrel on Friday flying by the island. Humpback Whales were off the hook on Saturday, an awesome display of lunge feeding. Photos of puffin and booby here: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47791646 So a great couple of island trips, and we are looking forward to our offshore pelagics (Saturday out of Half Moon Bay has spaces) this weekend which will allow us to sample more deep water than in the Farallon trips. http://alvarosadventures.com/boat-trips/pelagics/ . For southern Californians, on Sept 22 we have a trip heading out of Avila Beach (Morro Bay). Good birding. Alvaro Alvaro Jaramillo alvaro@... www.alvarosadventures.com 
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  9. August 25 pelagic trip to Tanner and Cortez Banks LINK
    DATE: Aug 2, 2018 @ 2:16pm, 48 day(s) ago
    Birders,
    
    I have organized a pelagic trip to the Cortez and Tanner Banks at the end of this month. The basic details are: departure from Dana Point aboard the R/V Sea Explorer, leaving at 1 AM and returning at 9 PM on Saturday, August 25 (20 hours); there are NO bunks or full galley on board, but possibly enough room to sleep on the floor or benches inside (plenty of room outside). The per person cost is $200, and there are only TWO spaces remaining.
    
    This should be an excellent opportunity to see species like Black-footed Albatross, Leach's Storm-Petrel, Red-billed Tropicbird, Craveri's Murrelet, Arctic Tern, South Polar Skua, and Long-tailed Jaeger. It is also a good opportunity to look for rare species such as Cook's and Hawaiian Petrels, Townsend's Storm-Petrel, Least Storm-Petrel, and Guadalupe Murrelet. On July 15 a trip from Ventura to nearby waters recorded nearly 100 Cook's Petrels, Tristram's Storm-Petrel, Wedge-rumped Storm-Petrel, two Nazca Boobies, Long-tailed Jaeger, South Polar Skua, Sabine's Gull, and Black, Ashy, and Leach's Storm-Petrels. Additionally, t hree Townsend's Storm-Petrels were photographed on a trip out of San Diego on July 29. <
    /div>
    
    If you are interested in going or have any questions, please email me back (off list) and I will send you additional details and/or payment information.
    
    Tom Benson
    San Bernardino, CA
    thomasabenson AT aol.com
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  11. Beat the Heat on a Pelagic Trip LINK
    DATE: Jul 27, 2018, 55 day(s) ago
    Hello, CalBirders,
    
    We are well into the sizzling days of summer and its a good time to think about lining up your pelagic trips.
    
    The year 2018 marks 43 years of offering pelagic trips by Shearwater Journeys! It has been an amazing journey, to be sure. Beginning August and running until October 21, we have a full line up of seabird and offshore trips ahead. Trips depart from Monterey Bay, Half Moon Bay, and Sausalito to the Farallon Islands. Presently, all trips on our program have spaces available except the August 11, Half Moon Bay trip which is sold out. A few trips are nearly sold out.
    
    FARALLON ISLANDS: AUGUST 5 & 12
    Spaces are available on both of these trips, although only 4 spaces are open on the August 12 trip.
    DEPARTURE: 7:30 am from Clipper Yacht Harbor, Sausalito. Return about 4 pm.
    From Sausalito, well sail under the iconic Golden Gate Bridge on a spotlessly clean, stable catamaran with excellent deck space to see the largest breeding seabird colony south of Alaska. Absolutely teeming with seabirds, the past few years weve also encountered NORTHERN GANNET, BROWN and BLUE-FOOTED BOOBIES. We have a 100% success rate finding many amazing TUFTED PUFFINS, up close and personal. Well head out to the edge of the Continental Shelf to look for albatross and other seabirds, and whales. Great photo ops of not only the seabirds, but also the Golden Gate Bridge from below.
    One trip report can be found here:
    http://shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com/2014/08/farallon-islands-august-3-2014-trip.html
    http://shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com/2013/08/trip-report-august-4-2013-farallon.html
    
    MONTEREY BAY: AUG. 3, 24, 31; SEP. 7, 8, 14, 16, 28, 29, 30; OCT. 6, 13, 21.
    For four decades we have offered seabird trips at Monterey Bay, recording some of the most amazing records not only for California, but also first records for North America. August is a great time to get out for the early fall migrants, especially Arctic Tern and Sabines Gull. It is also one of the best months for HAWAIIAN PETREL which we found on our August 25, 2017 Monterey trip. I have seen at least 10 Hawaiian Petrels during August.
    DEPARTURE: 7:00 am from Chris Fishing Shop, Fishermans Wharf, Monterey. Return about 3 pm.
    There is almost no finer place than Monterey Bay to see the best variety of seabirds and marine mammals during the fall season.
    
    **PLEASE NOTE: AUGUST 3 we shall be searching for COOKS PETRELS as 100+ were found on the recent Ventura pelagic trip. When this happened in 2009, we had a great time with Cooks Petrels also showing up on our Monterey trips. It was a record year.
    Trip reports of 2009 and the Cooks Petrel invasion.
    http://shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com/2009/08/monterey-bay-cooks-july-31-2009-story.html
    http://shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com/2009/08/still-cookin-chase-on.html
    http://shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com/2009/08/monterey-bay-nearshore-cooks-petrels.html
    
    MONTEREY BAY: OFFSHORE ALBACORE: SEP. 9 & 15.
    We invented the albacore trip nearly thirty years ago. Always a sell out, this is the single hottest selling trip on our program and with good reason. We have scored a number of first records including JOUANINS PETREL, STREAKED SHEARWATER, RED-TAILED and RED-BILLED TROPICBIRDS. This is the best trip to search for GUADALUPE and CRAVERIS MURRELETS, all three jaeger species, SOUTH POLAR SKUA, and blue whales. Please note: There was a misprint on my postcard mailer for the SEPTEMBER 9 DATE it is an albacore trip, not a bay trip. Spaces are available on September 9, but only 2spaces are available for September 15.
    
    More about the Albacore trips:
    http://shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com/2015/07/about-albacore-offshore-monterey-trip.html
    
    HALF MOON BAY: AUG. 11 (SOLD OUT); SEP. 22, 23; OCT. 13.
    We have a long history of being the first to offer pelagic trips departing from HMB. Expect the regular fall migrants with a chance to see Marbled Murrelet and possibly, the Northern Gannet. Rarities we have seen include: SALVINS ALBATROSS, WHITE-CHINNED PETREL, and several times, HAWAIIAN PETREL.
    
    COUNTY BIRDING: Usually, we cover at least two counties on each trip. So, for county birders, thats a good thing. Some of our Monterey trips have a special focus in Santa Cruz County a very difficult county for ticking seabirds.
    
    RESERVATIONS: To make a reservation on a trip that is close to sold out (which includes: Aug. 12; Sep. 7, 15), please email Debi: debi@... .
    
    CHUMMING: Shearwater Journeys has been collecting data on seabirds in the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary for over 40 years. This unique data set provides information on potentially substantial changes in seabird populations over time, in this area. To ensure continued collection of data on seabirds in the sanctuary using consistent methodology, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has reissued a research permit to use fish and squid-based seabird attractants (chum) within the sanctuary boundaries. This year, the permit was expanded to include our departures from Half Moon Bay. The Sanctuary recognizes the potential research importance of data collected by researchers on birder-based pelagic trips. We shall be chumming on all Monterey Bay and Half Moon Bay trips this season and in 2019. You, as a participant, will be actively engaged in collection of data. Thank you, in advance.
    
    Seabirding for Science,
    Debi Shearwater
    
    DEBRA SHEARWATER
    Shearwater Journeys, Inc.
    PO Box 190
    Hollister, CA 95024
    831.637.8527
    debi@...
    www.shearwaterjourneys.com
    www.shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com
    
    Celebrating 43 Years of Seabirding with Shearwater Journeys
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  13. Ventura pelagic trip report - 15 July 2018; multiple megas! LINK
    DATE: Jul 20, 2018 @ 7:32am, 62 day(s) ago
    I am finally getting a trip report out from Sunday's pelagic trip out of Ventura with Island Packers. We had some exceptional birds and photos of several storm-petrels have revealed that we had better birds than we knew. I will not go in to exhaustive detail of every segment of the trip, but will hit the highlights.
    
    We left Ventura on the Island Adventure and headed across the channel to Anacapa Island. Although there has not been any boobies on Anacapa yet in 2018, we had to look anyway and were stunned to find a Nazca Booby sitting on top of the arch! The bird sat there and preened in front of us for 20 minutes before we moved on. This is just the second Ventura County record (of a live bird) and one of less than 20 for California and North America. The day can't get any better than that...right Well maybe it did. We continued along the south shore of Anacapa Island where we found an American Oystercatcher in a place where we have seen them on past trips. Another California rarity and still before 9 am. You are welcome Logan.
    
    We then headed south of the islands to the areas we have been exploring on recent July trips. There were impressive numbers of Sooty and Pink-footed Shearwaters along the majority of the route and while riding a steep contour line to the south, the first scream of "Cook's Petrel!!" rang out for the day. Another was screamed out soon thereafter, but these first two were elusive and not seen by many. This is when the trip leader starts sweating bullets, but not to worry as we hit a steady stream of Cook's Petrels eventually getting some close passes and even small groups sitting on the water. Our ride south was littered with petrels and shearwaters. We also found a few late Scripps's Murrelets that Captain Jimmy expertly crept up on and allowed everyone on board to get great looks.
    
    After just crossing back into Ventura County waters, we found a large flock of storm-petrels sitting on the water (100+) that we crept up on. As we approached the flock a storm-petrel passed closely across the bow that I yelled out so the people in the bow could get on it. I shot a few photos since it was close and the verdict from the bow at the time was a dark-rumped Leach's Storm-Petrel. I will come back to this bird later. The flock flushed as we approached and the birds dispersed quickly. While the flock was primarily Ashy and Black Storm-Petrels, a small bird with a big white rump was seen briefly by only a few people before it disappeared. Some captured this bird in their photos of the flock and later analysis and consultation with experts proved it to be a Wedge-rumped Storm-Petrel! This is only the 14th record for the state, but most of the boat including myself did not see it. Thankfully some managed to get photos. While going through my photos of the flock, I found an apparent Fork-tailed Storm-Petrel that also eluded detection.
    
    As we continued on we had more storm-petrels including a few Townsend's, and a steady stream of shearwaters and the occasional Cook's Petrel. Several Long-tailed Jaegers and a South Polar Skua were also highlights. We eventually turned east and headed towards Santa Barbara Island to check the status of Brown Boobies at this little visited island. After running across several more Cook's Petrels that were farther east than we have ever seen in the region, we were several miles off the island when someone on the boat shouted "booby!" While I expected to see our first Brown Booby of the day, I was shocked to see a large white booby flying straight for the boat...our second Nazca Booby of the day!! Second record for Santa Barbara County and a very happy cadre of SBCo listers. The island did not disappoint as we had 50 Brown Boobies at Sutil Rock with several pairs exhibiting courting behavior. Hard to believe this species was rare in the region until just a few years ago. Upon leaving the island we started our slog back to Ventura against the swell and although the birds dropped off late in the day, we did have stellar looks at several Long-tailed Jaegers. Other birds seen throughout the day included Northern Fulmar, Black-vented Shearwater, Leach's Storm-Petrel, Cassin's Auklet, Common Murre, Rhinoceros Auklet, Pigeon Guillemot, Sabine's Gull, Red Phalarope, and Red-necked Phalarope.
    
    After getting home and not looking at any of my photos until Monday, I found my photos of the storm-petrel that crossed our bow and nearly had a heart attack. The camera captures what the eye can't see in an instant, and the photos revealed a stocky storm-petrel with a deeply forked tail, pale rump and back, bright carpal bars, and a contrastingly dark head. The field marks suggested this bird was likely a Markham's or a Tristram's Storm-Petrel. Upon consulting with a few experts who are familiar with these species, the responses came back overwhelmingly that the bird in question was a Tristram's Storm-Petrel! If accepted, this would be the first record of a free-flying bird in North American waters. We saw one on a 2007 July trip that was rejected by the CBRC, and two have been captured in mist nets on the Farallon Islands in recent years. I already posted a photo on Facebook and will cross post it to several lists. Our team will work up a submission to the CBRC.
    
    This was an amazing trip and we could not do it without the unwavering support of Island Packers and their staff. Joel Barrett and his passion for birds makes these trips happen on their end and we could not do it without him. Captain Jimmy McWaters handled the boat and got us on birds like the seasoned expert he is. Thanks also go out to Leanne Kleinsmith and Sam the whale man for their support to passengers throughout the day. Our leaders/spotters did a spectacular job finding birds and getting people on them all day so special thanks to Todd McGrath, Adam Searcy, Peter Gaede, Hugh Ranson, Wes Fritz, and Bernardo Alps.
    
    Our next scheduled trip is Oct 6, 2018 although we are discussing a chase trip out to the area where we had Cook's Petrels and storm-petrels. If we can get something scheduled I will announce it out to the listserves. Stay tuned.
    
    Dave Pereksta
    Ventura, CA
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  15. August 25 pelagic trip to Tanner and Cortez Banks LINK
    DATE: Jul 9, 2018 @ 10:45am, 2 month(s) ago
    Birders,
    
    I have organized a pelagic trip to the Cortez and Tanner Banks next month. The basic details are: departure from Dana Point aboard the R/V Sea Explorer, leaving at 1-2 AM and returning at 8-9 PM on Saturday, August 25 (18-20 hours); there are NO bunks or full galley on board, but possibly enough room to sleep on the floor or benches inside (plenty of room outside). The per person cost is $200, and there are currently about 10 spaces remaining.
    
    This should be an excellent opportunity to see species like Black-footed Albatross, Leach's Storm-Petrel, Red-billed Tropicbird, Craveri's Murrelet, Arctic Tern, South Polar Skua, and Long-tailed Jaeger. It is also a good opportunity to look for rare species such as Cook's and Hawaiian Petrels, Townsend's Storm-Petrel, Least Storm-Petrel, and Guadalupe Murrelet.
    
    If you are interested in going or have any questions, please email me back (off list) and I will send you additional details and/or payment information.
    
    Tom Benson
    San Bernardino, CA
    thomasabenson AT aol.com
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  17. Potential Cortez Bank pelagic trip, August 25 LINK
    DATE: May 29, 2018, 4 month(s) ago
    California birders,
    
    I am trying to organize a pelagic trip to the Cortez Bank this year. The basic details are: departure from Dana Point aboard the R/V Sea Explorer (same boat used on Orange County Audubon pelagics), leaving at 1-2 AM and returning at 8-9 PM on Saturday, August 25 (18-20 hours); there are NO bunks or full galley on board, but possibly enough room to sleep on the floor or benches inside (plenty of room outside). The per person cost will likely be $200 (it will not be more than that).
    
    This should be an excellent opportunity to add species like Black-footed Albatross, Leach's Storm-Petrel, Red-billed Tropicbird, Craveri's Murrelet, Arctic Tern, South Polar Skua, and Long-tailed Jaeger to your LA County (and California) list. It is also a good opportunity to look for rare species such as Cook's and Hawaiian Petrels, Townsend's Storm-Petrel, Least Storm-Petrel, and Guadalupe Murrelet.
    
    If you are interested in going, please email me back (off list) and let me know so I can put your name on the manifest and determine if there is enough interest to fill the boat. I have a list of about 15 people who have expressed interest already, but we need at least 15 more to fill the boat and make this trip happen. If you have any questions regarding the details of the trip, please contact me and I will answer them to the best of my ability.
    
    Tom
    thomasabenson AT aol.com
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  19. JOUANIN'S PETREL: A FIRST RECORD FOR NORTH AMERICA LINK
    DATE: Apr 11, 2018 @ 9:05pm, 5 month(s) ago
    Howdy, CalBirders,
    
    JOUANIN’S PETREL: FIRST NORTH AMERICAN RECORD:
    
    Today I learned that the “mystery” petrel briefly observed and photographed during the Saturday, September 12, 2015 Shearwater Journeys’ offshore albacore trip has been accepted by the California Bird Records Committee as a JOUANIN’S PETREL ( Bulweria fallax ). This record represents the first accepted record of this north-west Indian Ocean seabird for North America.
    
    This was a sold out trip accompanied by leaders: Scott Terrill, Linda Terrill, Alex Rinkert, Mary Gustafson, Rick Fournier, and Debi Shearwater. In addition, Will Brooks (a leader) was on board as a “regular” along with his father, Jim Brooks. Expert seabirder, Fabio Olmos from Brazil was on board, along with many keen local and out-of-state seabirders: Cooper Scallan, Doug Koch, Bryan Hix, Paul Fenwick, Chris Hartzell, Hillary White, Peder Svingen, Peter Haines, and others. Our captain this day was John Klusmire whose experience with Debi dates back to the mid-1980’s.
    
    Ace leader, Alex Rinkert, first spotted the petrel and called it a “Bulwer’s Petrel” from the stern of the boat which was a pretty darned good call. As the petrel circled the vessel toward the bow, Scott Terrill and I had a view as it crossed to the other side. However, having seen quite a few Bulwer’s Petrels (including the first record for North America on another of our Monterey Bay trips some years ago), I was immediately convinced that this bird was not a Bulwer’s Petrel, based on size alone. The sighting was in Santa Cruz County, based on using “nearest point of land” and at a depth of only 200 fathoms. This species occurs in shallow waters within its normal range.
    
    It should be noted that an extremely warm water “river” occurred along the north coast, off Santa Cruz and Half Moon Bay during this period. The presence of warm water by itself was not so much a factor, as the fact that it smashed into a front of significantly cold water. It was this frontal zone that produced the food for seabirds. (It’s all about food.) Indeed, only 3 days later, we found a WHITE-CHINNED PETREL on our September 15, 2015 Half Moon Bay trip. That petrel flew in and sat on the water for 45 minutes— birders seemed to become bored with it!
    
    Much discussion ensued following the sighting of the September 12 petrel. Eventually, Scott Terrill and I put together all of the details we could muster— including many (not-so-great) photos which became known as “the petrel package.” This was circulated to some of the top world seabirders. David Ainley, Peter Harrison and Hadoram Shirihai responded independently and immediately that they judged the petrel to be a JOUANIN’S PETREL!
    
    Finally, the package went to the CBRC and they made a concurring diagnosis. Of course, any first record for North America requires a laborious vetting, but especially so with seabirds which often present the most fleeting of views.
    
    So, although we had a very good number of images, I would not particularly call any of them “great.” I will try to put up a post on my blog with some of these images. I will post about that when it becomes available.
    
    Subsequent to our first record, nine months later (June 2016) a petrel captured during mist netting at Santa Cruz Island (southern California) was identified as a Jouanin’s Petrel. It may or may not have been the same individual we saw in September 2015.
    
    Jouanin’s Petrel occurs widely offshore in the Arabian Sea and Gulfs of Aden and Oman, where it is the commonest pelagic seabird. It has showed up as a vagrant off Australia, Kenya, Seychelles, Saudi Arabia, and other places. BirdLife lists this species as Near Threatened. There are about 4 records for Hawaii.
    
    If you’d like to read an interesting and fun tale about Jouanin’s Petrels, I recommend this article by my friend, Bob Flood:
    http://www.rarebirdalert.co.uk/v2/Content/Scilly_Pelagics_Jouanins_Petrels.aspxs_id=746315633
    
    HISTORY OF OFFSHORE MONTEREY ALBACORE TRIPS:
    
    The “albacore, offshore Monterey” pelagic trip was invented by Debi Shearwater back in 1983. During the 1980’s albacore, a type of tuna, regularly occurred off Monterey Bay. Reports from fishermen of incredible seabird activity prompted me to begin offering these 12 hour trips. The purpose of this trip was to present a wholistic approach to enjoying marine life. To that end, we endeavored to search for key seabirds, including Craveri’s, Scripps’s, and Guadalupe Murrelets; blue and Baird’s Beaked whales; and to catch albacore, the “cadillac” of the tunas. We never dreamed these trips would turn out to produce so many incredible seabird records. Even though the albacore changed their migration pattern and rarely occur off Monterey nowadays, we continue to operate albacore trips. These trips always sell out in advance.
    
    Other rare, or very uncommon seabirds we have discovered on Shearwater Journeys’ past albacore trips have included: Laysan Albatross; Cook’s and Hawaiian Petrels; Streaked, Flesh-footed, Greater, and Manx Shearwaters; Least and Leach’s Storm-Petrels; Red-billed and Red-tailed Tropicbirds; Brown Booby; Craveri’s, Scripps’s, and Guadalupe Murrelets. This is a spectacular trip for jaegers, often encountering over 100 in one day! We almost always have a “grand slam” on Pomarine, Parasitic, and Long-tailed Jaegers, Long-tailed being the most commonly sighted. It is the single best trip to see South Polar Skua.
    
    Our September 9, 2017 Albacore trip indeed found all of the jaegers, South Polar Skua; Guadalupe, Scripps’s, and Craveri’s Murrelets, and many of the “regular” fall species. Northern Waterthrush and American Redstart were “bonus” birds.
    
    OUR UPCOMING ALBACORE: OFFSHORE MONTEREY TRIPS:
    SUN. SEP. 9
    SAT. SEP. 15
    
    See our complete schedule for 2018:
    http://www.shearwaterjourneys.com/schedule.html
    
    Past trip reports:
    Oct. 6, 2001 with STREAKED SHEARWATER and Black-throated Gray Warbler:
    http://www.shearwaterjourneys.com/ag011006.html
    Sep. 15, 2002 with 42 LONG-TAILED JAEGERS and murrelets:
    http://www.shearwaterjourneys.com/020913.html
    Sep. 10, 2006 with ten FLESH-FOOTED SHEARWATERS and 1500+ Buller’s Shearwaters:
    http://www.shearwaterjourneys.com/ag060910.htm
    Sep. 13, 2008 with 7000 ASHY STORM-PETRELS:
    http://shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com/2008/09/shearwater-birthday-birding-sep-13-2008.html
    Sep. 12, 2009 with 24 COOK’S PETRELS and one HAWAIIAN PETREL:
    http://shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com/2009/09/trip-report-sep-12-2009-monterey.html
    
    I gratefully thank all of the leaders and especially, the participants from near and far —representing 14 different states in the USA and Canada and Brazil. Without you , the participants, we have nothing. Special thanks to the many photographers on board who sent their images, and to the reviewers who worked on this amazing record.
    
    Now check that box!
    What’s next
    Still discovering first North American records after 40 years of trips!
    Debi Shearwater
    
    DEBRA SHEARWATER
    Shearwater Journeys, Inc.
    PO Box 190
    Hollister, CA 95024
    831.637.8527
    debi@...
    www.shearwaterjourneys.com
    www.shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com
    
    Celebrating 43 Years of Seabirding with Shearwater Journeys
  20. -back to top-
  21. JOUANIN'S PETREL: A FIRST RECORD FOR NORTH AMERICA LINK
    DATE: Apr 11, 2018 @ 9:04pm, 5 month(s) ago
    Howdy, CalBirders,
    
    JOUANIN’S PETREL: FIRST NORTH AMERICAN RECORD:
    
    Today I learned that the “mystery” petrel briefly observed and photographed during the Saturday, September 12, 2015 Shearwater Journeys’ offshore albacore trip has been accepted by the California Bird Records Committee as a JOUANIN’S PETREL ( Bulweria fallax ). This record represents the first accepted record of this north-west Indian Ocean seabird for North America.
    
    This was a sold out trip accompanied by leaders: Scott Terrill, Linda Terrill, Alex Rinkert, Mary Gustafson, Rick Fournier, and Debi Shearwater. In addition, Will Brooks (a leader) was on board as a “regular” along with his father, Jim Brooks. Expert seabirder, Fabio Olmos from Brazil was on board, along with many keen local and out-of-state seabirders: Cooper Scallan, Doug Koch, Bryan Hix, Paul Fenwick, Chris Hartzell, Hillary White, Peder Svingen, Peter Haines, and others. Our captain this day was John Klusmire whose experience with Debi dates back to the mid-1980’s.
    
    Ace leader, Alex Rinkert, first spotted the petrel and called it a “Bulwer’s Petrel” from the stern of the boat which was a pretty darned good call. As the petrel circled the vessel toward the bow, Scott Terrill and I had a view as it crossed to the other side. However, having seen quite a few Bulwer’s Petrels (including the first record for North America on another of our Monterey Bay trips some years ago), I was immediately convinced that this bird was not a Bulwer’s Petrel, based on size alone. The sighting was in Santa Cruz County, based on using “nearest point of land” and at a depth of only 200 fathoms. This species occurs in shallow waters within its normal range.
    
    It should be noted that an extremely warm water “river” occurred along the north coast, off Santa Cruz and Half Moon Bay during this period. The presence of warm water by itself was not so much a factor, as the fact that it smashed into a front of significantly cold water. It was this frontal zone that produced the food for seabirds. (It’s all about food.) Indeed, only 3 days later, we found a WHITE-CHINNED PETREL on our September 15, 2015 Half Moon Bay trip. That petrel flew in and sat on the water for 45 minutes— birders seemed to become bored with it!
    
    Much discussion ensued following the sighting of the September 12 petrel. Eventually, Scott Terrill and I put together all of the details we could muster— including many (not-so-great) photos which became known as “the petrel package.” This was circulated to some of the top world seabirders. David Ainley, Peter Harrison and Hadoram Shirihai responded independently and immediately that they judged the petrel to be a JOUANIN’S PETREL!
    
    Finally, the package went to the CBRC and they made a concurring diagnosis. Of course, any first record for North America requires a laborious vetting, but especially so with seabirds which often present the most fleeting of views.
    
    So, although we had a very good number of images, I would not particularly call any of them “great.” I will try to put up a post on my blog with some of these images. I will post about that when it becomes available.
    
    Subsequent to our first record, nine months later (June 2016) a petrel captured during mist netting at Santa Cruz Island (southern California) was identified as a Jouanin’s Petrel. It may or may not have been the same individual we saw in September 2015.
    
    Jouanin’s Petrel occurs widely offshore in the Arabian Sea and Gulfs of Aden and Oman, where it is the commonest pelagic seabird. It has showed up as a vagrant off Australia, Kenya, Seychelles, Saudi Arabia, and other places. BirdLife lists this species as Near Threatened. There are about 4 records for Hawaii.
    
    If you’d like to read an interesting and fun tale about Jouanin’s Petrels, I recommend this article by my friend, Bob Flood:
    http://www.rarebirdalert.co.uk/v2/Content/Scilly_Pelagics_Jouanins_Petrels.aspxs_id=746315633
    
    HISTORY OF OFFSHORE MONTEREY ALBACORE TRIPS:
    
    The “albacore, offshore Monterey” pelagic trip was invented by Debi Shearwater back in 1983. During the 1980’s albacore, a type of tuna, regularly occurred off Monterey Bay. Reports from fishermen of incredible seabird activity prompted me to begin offering these 12 hour trips. The purpose of this trip was to present a wholistic approach to enjoying marine life. To that end, we endeavored to search for key seabirds, including Craveri’s, Scripps’s, and Guadalupe Murrelets; blue and Baird’s Beaked whales; and to catch albacore, the “cadillac” of the tunas. We never dreamed these trips would turn out to produce so many incredible seabird records. Even though the albacore changed their migration pattern and rarely occur off Monterey nowadays, we continue to operate albacore trips. These trips always sell out in advance.
    
    Other rare, or very uncommon seabirds we have discovered on Shearwater Journeys’ past albacore trips have included: Laysan Albatross; Cook’s and Hawaiian Petrels; Streaked, Flesh-footed, Greater, and Manx Shearwaters; Least and Leach’s Storm-Petrels; Red-billed and Red-tailed Tropicbirds; Brown Booby; Craveri’s, Scripps’s, and Guadalupe Murrelets. This is a spectacular trip for jaegers, often encountering over 100 in one day! We almost always have a “grand slam” on Pomarine, Parasitic, and Long-tailed Jaegers, Long-tailed being the most commonly sighted. It is the single best trip to see South Polar Skua.
    
    Our September 9, 2017 Albacore trip indeed found all of the jaegers, South Polar Skua; Guadalupe, Scripps’s, and Craveri’s Murrelets, and many of the “regular” fall species. Northern Waterthrush and American Redstart were “bonus” birds.
    
    OUR UPCOMING ALBACORE: OFFSHORE MONTEREY TRIPS:
    SUN. SEP. 9
    SAT. SEP. 15
    
    See our complete schedule for 2018:
    http://www.shearwaterjourneys.com/schedule.html
    
    Past trip reports:
    Oct. 6, 2001 with STREAKED SHEARWATER and Black-throated Gray Warbler:
    http://www.shearwaterjourneys.com/ag011006.html
    Sep. 15, 2002 with 42 LONG-TAILED JAEGERS and murrelets:
    http://www.shearwaterjourneys.com/020913.html
    Sep. 10, 2006 with ten FLESH-FOOTED SHEARWATERS and 1500+ Buller’s Shearwaters:
    http://www.shearwaterjourneys.com/ag060910.htm
    Sep. 13, 2008 with 7000 ASHY STORM-PETRELS:
    http://shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com/2008/09/shearwater-birthday-birding-sep-13-2008.html
    Sep. 12, 2009 with 24 COOK’S PETRELS and one HAWAIIAN PETREL:
    http://shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com/2009/09/trip-report-sep-12-2009-monterey.html
    
    I gratefully thank all of the leaders and especially, the participants from near and far —representing 14 different states in the USA and Canada and Brazil. Without you , the participants, we have nothing. Special thanks to the many photographers on board who sent their images, and to the reviewers who worked on this amazing record.
    
    Now check that box!
    What’s next
    Still discovering first North American records after 40 years of trips!
    Debi Shearwater
    
    DEBRA SHEARWATER
    Shearwater Journeys, Inc.
    PO Box 190
    Hollister, CA 95024
    831.637.8527
    debi@...
    www.shearwaterjourneys.com
    www.shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com
    
    Celebrating 43 Years of Seabirding with Shearwater Journeys
  22. -back to top-
  23. 10/16 Monterey Seabirds trip report-Scripps's, Guadalupe Murrelets, Flesh-foot, and other goodies LINK
    DATE: Oct 17, 2017 @ 2:01pm, 11 month(s) ago
    All,    Monterey Seabirds ended our pelagic season with an incredible tour of Monterey County yesterday.  This hearty and patient bunch of birders was a great group to be with for the day.  Everyone aboard was eager to run far offshore to get to a strong temperature break and it paid off.
      First, we had to get there.  Inside the Monterey Bay, we encountered BULLER'S, PINK-FOOTED, SOOTY and BLACK-VENTED SHEARWATERS.  One probable Short-tailed shearwater got away before a positive identification.  NORTHERN FULMAR (13) and BLACK-FOOTED ALBATROSS were encountered farther out.  We enjoyed great studies of POMARINE (7) and PARASITIC JAEGER.
      Conditions far from shore were calm and glassy.  We enjoyed the near t-shirt weather.
      A Skua slam was rounded out with a LONG-TAILED JAEGER when we got into deeper water.  SOUTH POLAR SKUA (7) were out in the deeper water as well.
      It took some patience to get to the warmer water as we hit a spell of very few birds for a while. One of two YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS landed on the boat and helped us pass the time. 
      Water temperatures quickly jumped from mid/upper 50s to mid 60s as we hit the temperature break. This is where we found the first pair of GUADALUPE MURRELETS (4 total). Two more were found well south of the first two.  While tracking the second pair, a pair of SCRIPPS'S MURRELETS (2) were also found.  Eight SABINE'S GULLS flew south during our time in the warm zone.
      Four more MURRELET SPP. got away when we got closer to shore.
      Icing for our cake Yes please!  A single FLESH-FOOTED SHEARWATER gave us distant but satisfying looks with gorgeous views of the Big Sur coast as background. 
      Also seen during the trip were several offshore COMMON LOON as well as RED-THROATED LOON.
      We enjoyed a stunning sunset with HUMPBACK WHALES, PACIFIC WHITE-SIDED and NORTHERN RIGHT WHALE DOLPHINS in the foreground.  BLUE SHARK (4) and Mola mola were found at various times during the epic journey.
      I owe a huge thanks to all of our participants this season.  I also have a deep gratitude for all of our spotters this year.  An extra thanks goes out to Dorian Anderson for spotting on so many of our trips and for finding most of our Tufted Puffins this season!
      Looking forward to next season!
      Photos will be posted soon to our facebook page as well as the eBird lists. Here's one:
    ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S39979385  
    https://www.facebook.com/montereyseabirdtours/  
    
    Good birding to all,
    
    Mark Kudrav
    Pacific Grove
    Monterey Seabirds
    
      
      
  24. -back to top-
  25. 10/15 Monterey Seabirds Trip Report + our last pelagic is tomorrow. LINK
    DATE: Oct 15, 2017 @ 4:49pm, 11 month(s) ago
    All,   Monterey Seabirds went out on a fantastic pelagic today.  It was a wonderfully diverse trip. Today we stayed in Monterey County water the entire time.  Here's a list of some highlights:
    COMMON LOON (about 15 miles offshore)
    PACIFIC LOON
    RED THROATED LOON
    ASHY STORM-PETREL
    BLACK-FOOTED ALBATROSS
    BULLER'S SHEARWATER
    BLACK-VENTED SHEARWATER (they're back! They were in a month ago but not since.)
    SOOTY SHEARWATER
    PINK-FOOTED SHEARWATER
    NORTHERN FULMAR
    MARBLED GODWIT (offshore about 8 mile)
    RED-NECKED PHALAROPE
    BONAPARTE'S GULL (first of the season for me)
    POMARINE JAEGER
    PARASITIC JAEGER
    SOUTH POLAR SKUA (6)!!!
    RHINOCEROS AUKLET
    CASSIN'S AUKLET
    TUFTED PUFFIN
    HUMPBACK WHALE (20)
    FIN WHALE  (2)
    PACIFIC WHITE-SIDED DOLPHIN
    MOLA MOLA
    BLUE SHARK (3)
    
    Any day with a TUFTED PUFFIN is a good day.  Also, six SOUTH POLAR SKUA were a real delight for folks.
    
    It's not to late to join us tomorrow on our 12-hour trip!  We will be going farther offshore (30+ miles) where there is currently a big temperature break.  We'd love to have you.
    
    Vist montereyseabirds.com or call (831)375-4658
    or
    Feel free to show up at the dock in the morning if you get this after business hours.  We depart at 7:30 from the Monterey Bay Whale Watch shop on Fisherman's Wharf.
    
    Good Birding,
    Mark Kudrav
    Monterey Seabirds
    Pacific Grove
  26. -back to top-
  27. 10/11--Pt. Pinos Seawatch/Monterey Seabirds Pelagics/BOBOLINKS (2)-Carmel Valley LINK
    DATE: Oct 11, 2017 @ 3:06pm, 11 month(s) ago
    All,    This morning a gentle NW wind brought decent birds to the Point Pinos Seawatch.  Brian Sullivan was also there.
      Some nice birds included:
    BLACK-FOOTED ALBATROSS (2)
    BLACK-VENTED SHEARWATERS, PINK-FOOTED, BULLER'S, SOOTY SHEARWATERS
    Brian called out one SHORT-TAILED SHEARWATER, though I didn't get a diagnostic look myself.
    PARASITIC and POMARINE JAEGER
    CASSIN'S AUKLETS
    COMMON LOON (5)
      A previously reported female LESSER SCAUP and two CACKLING GEESE were on Crespi Pond.
     Two BOBOLINKS were found yesterday on the South Bank Trail in Carmel Valley, I believe by Carol Rose. Sorry if I got that wrong.  One was reported this morning.  I missed them today after two hours of searching. Also there today were a SWAMP SPARROW, NASHVILLE WARBLERS, and two PALM WABLERS.
    eBird reports have location details but they were in the weedy field adjacent to the main grassy field.  A long fence splits the fields. 
    
    Lastly, MONTEREY SEABIRDS has our last two pelagic birding trips coming up. Sunday Oct. 15- 8-hr
    Monday Oct. 16- 12-hr
    
    The long range weather is looking good for those trips.  We hope to get fairly far offshore on the 12-hour trip.  It should be a blast.  
    
    We'd like to fill both trips, so we're offering a great deal.  If you book both trips, we'll give you 50% off on the 12-hour trip . That makes that trip just $80 dollars!
    
    Call (831) 375-4658 or visit montereyseabirds.com to make a reservation.
    
    I failed to do a trip report of our last trip on Oct. 1 but we did find a SOUTH POLAR SKUA, hundreds of BULLER'S SHEARWATERS, a few ASHY STORM-PETRELS, 3 COMMIC TERNS and a pair of black and white MURRELET Spp.
    
    Looking forward to a strong NW wind the next couple of days (including overnight) .  It should make for some great seawatching at the point. 
    
    Good Birding, 
    
    Mark Kudrav
    Pacific Grove
    Monterey Seabirds- montereyseabirds.com
  28. -back to top-
  29. SEP 24 PELAGIC REPORT LINK
    DATE: Sep 26, 2017 @ 10:23am, 12 month(s) ago
    Howdy, CalBird’ers,
    
    Birders on Shearwater Journeys’ September 24 Monterey Bay pelagic trip had another fine day at sea. Highlights included great views of BLACK-FOOTED ALBATROSS; PINK-FOOTED, FLESH-FOOTED, BULLER’S and SOOTY SHEARWATERS. TwoBLACK-VENTED SHEARWATERS made a fast pass on return to the harbor. The Flesh-footed Shearwater gave a great show at the stern of the vessel. Photographic images were made with three species of shearwaters in flight in one frame!
    
    One SOUTH POLAR SKUA and a fair number of POMARINE and PARASITIC JAEAGERS were harassing gulls or terns. A few more CASSIN’S AUKLETS had arrived, as compared to the September 22 trip. There seems to be krill deep in the water column. It if moves closer to the surface, these early buggers will be right on top of it! Three TUFTED PUFFINS were a good find.
    
    Two SURFBIRDS were along the CG jetty along with the usual BLACK TURNSTONES. A small pod of BOTTLENOSE DOLPHINS were just off Lover’s Point beach.
    
    BLUE and HUMPBACK WHALES continue to feed in the bay.RISSO’S and LONG-BEAKED COMMON DOLPHINS were milling about.
    
    Seabirds were recorded in both Monterey and Santa Cruz Counties. This is the at least the second record of Flesh-footed Shearwater in Santa Cruz County this season.
    
    Upcoming trips with spaces available include:
    
    *SEP 30with Alex Rinkert, Nick Levendosky, Scott & Linda Terrill, Clay Kempf
    OCT 8 with Alex Rinkert, Nick Levendosky, Clay Kempf, Scott & Linda Terrill
    
    Spaces are available on both trips. We meet at 7 a.m. and return about 3 p.m. For reservations email me: debi@...
    
    *PLEASE NOTE: SEP 30th is our annual SANTA CRUZ COUNTY pelagic trip!We’ve already seen some great SCZ County seabirds: FLESH-FOOTED SHEARWATER, SOUTH POLAR SKUA, SABINE’S GULL, ASHY STORM-PETREL, GUADALUPE, CRAVERI’S and SCRIPPS’S MURRELETS, and NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH and AMERICAN REDSTART! This trip is $105 and is a regular trip from 7 am to 3 pm.
    
    Living the Salt Life and heading for Tropical Birds!
    Debi Shearwater
    
    DEBRA SHEARWATER
    Shearwater Journeys, Inc.
    PO Box 190
    Hollister, CA 95024
    831.637.8527
    debi@...
    www.shearwaterjourneys.com
    www.shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com
    
    Celebrating 42 Years of Seabirding with Shearwater Journeys
  30. -back to top-


-revision history-
v1.30 - 01/05/16 - Revamped cloud logic, optimized database queries, linked to eBird rarities.
v1.23 - 12/08/11 - Added direct link to CBRC records.
v1.22 - 12/03/11 - Corrected GMT offsets on dates. Added last 5 posts at top.
v1.21 - 11/24/11 - Added direct link to range map for NA birds.
v1.2  - 11/23/11 - Greatly improved graphing technology - separates month vs. year by posts. Added species auto-complete functionality.
v1.14 - 11/22/11 - Added cloud bubble for common thread topics.
v1.13 - 11/22/11 - Added integrated photos where available.
v1.12 - 11/22/11 - Added multiple input boxes for additional refinement, negative search criteria (eg. -keyword).
v1.11 - 11/22/11 - Added banding code, species look-up. Also direct link to recent eBird observations.
 v1.1 - 11/22/11 - Added 'date' functionality. Shows top 'month/year' combinations for a query. Restrict results to that 'month/year'.
 v1.0 - 11/21/11 - Initial version coded. Currently archiving 'lacobirds' and 'calbirds'.