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   Pacific Loon
Pacific Loon
Gavia pacifica


   Pacific Loon (Gavia pacifica) - PALO (recent eBird sightings, view CBRC records, range map
)

  1. Re: [CALBIRDS] Pacific Loons MIA at 'Point Pinos Seawatch' this year LINK
    DATE: Dec 5, 2017 @ 12:11pm, 6 day(s) ago
    Hi Brian,
    
    We have had a similar situation at Point La Jolla, San Diego County as what you are describing.  Usually mid November to Thanksgiving is peak seawatching time here for loon migration and Surf Scoter movement with other duck species mixed in.  It has been very, very slow.  Much smaller numbers of Pacific Loon than normal.  I think I had just one day with a 5-6K maximum, blocks of birds coming by in 50-100 size flocks.  It looked like the precursor to some big days but that did not materialize.  Previous years not unusual to get 1-2 days during this time period of full bore constant stream of birds at 5-6K per hour.  The number of Surf Scoters coming by Point La Jolla this year also about 1/10th of normal at the most.  Usually we can expect good days with suitable winds and scoters coming by 2-3K for a 4 hour watch and hard pressed to see 100-200 birds.
    
    Weather has been very benign down here so far this fall.  No real onshore wind events, only a trace of rain.  There was one day the winds picked up to 15-20 knots from the west but there was no sign of bird movement.  I am not sure what is going on - the two hypotheses you describe come to mind.  I guess we should know soon enough if the birds are still staging to the north and peak movement window has shifted later by some weeks.
    
    Gary Nunn,
    Pacific Beach.
    
    On Wed, Nov 29, 2017 at 8:50 PM, Brian Sullivan heraldpetrel@... [CALBIRDS] < CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com > wrote:
    
      Hi All,
    
    For the past two years Monterey Audubon has sponsored a 6-week fall seawatch at Point Pinos in Monterey County. The count runs from 1 Nov - 15 Dec. The focus of of the count is Pacific Loons, and during each of the last two years we tallied ~250,000 migrant loons during the period.
    
    This year has been quite different. Despite having favorable, though not great, weather conditions, Pacific Loon numbers have been dismal. Our biggest day so far barely approached 10K (most of those in just two hours on the morning of the 27th), and the season total is probably less than 20K--so far.
    
    I'm wondering if others have been seeing large concentrations of staging loons in places along the coast, or whether seawatchers have had good flights to the north and/or south of Monterey County this fall I spent .5hr watching from Pigeon Point in San Mateo on Saturday and had thousands of Pacific Loons--all moving north! I'm not sure what that was all about, but at Point Pinos we don't see northbound loons in fall.
    
    It seems like there are two possibilities: they haven't made it this far south yet and they are staging in big numbers to the north; or they are passing to the west of our limit of vision, well offshore. Thanksgiving has proven the be the peak time for Pacific Loons here, so the flight is certainly late, if it is to come at all this year. Pacific Loons are pretty scarce once you get truly offshore, so the idea of thousands moving many miles off the coast seems unlikely, though certainly possible.
    
    Any thoughts would be appreciated.
    
    Perplexed in Monterey...
    
    Brian
    
    --
    ===========
    Brian L. Sullivan
    
    eBird Project Leader
    www.ebird.org
    
    Photo Editor
    Birds of North America Online
    http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/ BNA
    ------------------------------ -
    
    --
    Gary Nunn
    you can find me on twitter, @garybnunn
    San Diego Birding - my blog
    garybnunn@...
    
    Mobile: 650-305-0029
  2. -back to top-
  3. Re: [CALBIRDS] Pacific Loons MIA at 'Point Pinos Seawatch' this year LINK
    DATE: Nov 29, 2017, 13 day(s) ago
    Dear Perplexed,
    
    I suspect that your first hypothesis is correct.  I was impressed by the number of PALOs (many thousands) rafting off Devil's Slide two weekends ago, and there seem to be higher-than-normal numbers (for November) still passing Humboldt (e.g., close to 30K in just two eBird reports from the North Jetty).  On the other hand, only one individual has been reported to eBird from all of Del Norte this month.
    
    Ken Burton
    Crescent City
    
    On Wed, Nov 29, 2017 at 8:50 PM, Brian Sullivan heraldpetrel@... [CALBIRDS] < CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com > wrote:
    
      Hi All,
    
    For the past two years Monterey Audubon has sponsored a 6-week fall seawatch at Point Pinos in Monterey County. The count runs from 1 Nov - 15 Dec. The focus of of the count is Pacific Loons, and during each of the last two years we tallied ~250,000 migrant loons during the period.
    
    This year has been quite different. Despite having favorable, though not great, weather conditions, Pacific Loon numbers have been dismal. Our biggest day so far barely approached 10K (most of those in just two hours on the morning of the 27th), and the season total is probably less than 20K--so far.
    
    I'm wondering if others have been seeing large concentrations of staging loons in places along the coast, or whether seawatchers have had good flights to the north and/or south of Monterey County this fall I spent .5hr watching from Pigeon Point in San Mateo on Saturday and had thousands of Pacific Loons--all moving north! I'm not sure what that was all about, but at Point Pinos we don't see northbound loons in fall.
    
    It seems like there are two possibilities: they haven't made it this far south yet and they are staging in big numbers to the north; or they are passing to the west of our limit of vision, well offshore. Thanksgiving has proven the be the peak time for Pacific Loons here, so the flight is certainly late, if it is to come at all this year. Pacific Loons are pretty scarce once you get truly offshore, so the idea of thousands moving many miles off the coast seems unlikely, though certainly possible.
    
    Any thoughts would be appreciated.
    
    Perplexed in Monterey...
    
    Brian
    
    --
    ===========
    Brian L. Sullivan
    
    eBird Project Leader
    www.ebird.org
    
    Photo Editor
    Birds of North America Online
    http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/ BNA
    ------------------------------ -
  4. -back to top-
  5. Pacific Loons MIA at 'Point Pinos Seawatch' this year LINK
    DATE: Nov 29, 2017, 13 day(s) ago
    Hi All,
    
    For the past two years Monterey Audubon has sponsored a 6-week fall seawatch at Point Pinos in Monterey County. The count runs from 1 Nov - 15 Dec. The focus of of the count is Pacific Loons, and during each of the last two years we tallied ~250,000 migrant loons during the period.
    
    This year has been quite different. Despite having favorable, though not great, weather conditions, Pacific Loon numbers have been dismal. Our biggest day so far barely approached 10K (most of those in just two hours on the morning of the 27th), and the season total is probably less than 20K--so far.
    
    I'm wondering if others have been seeing large concentrations of staging loons in places along the coast, or whether seawatchers have had good flights to the north and/or south of Monterey County this fall I spent .5hr watching from Pigeon Point in San Mateo on Saturday and had thousands of Pacific Loons--all moving north! I'm not sure what that was all about, but at Point Pinos we don't see northbound loons in fall.
    
    It seems like there are two possibilities: they haven't made it this far south yet and they are staging in big numbers to the north; or they are passing to the west of our limit of vision, well offshore. Thanksgiving has proven the be the peak time for Pacific Loons here, so the flight is certainly late, if it is to come at all this year. Pacific Loons are pretty scarce once you get truly offshore, so the idea of thousands moving many miles off the coast seems unlikely, though certainly possible.
    
    Any thoughts would be appreciated.
    
    Perplexed in Monterey...
    
    Brian
    
    --
    ===========
    Brian L. Sullivan
    
    eBird Project Leader
    www.ebird.org
    
    Photo Editor
    Birds of North America Online
    http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/BNA
    -------------------------------
  6. -back to top-
  7. 10/15 Monterey Seabirds Trip Report + our last pelagic is tomorrow. LINK
    DATE: Oct 15, 2017 @ 4:49pm, 57 day(s) ago
    All,   Monterey Seabirds went out on a fantastic pelagic today.  It was a wonderfully diverse trip. Today we stayed in Monterey County water the entire time.  Here's a list of some highlights:
    COMMON LOON (about 15 miles offshore)
    PACIFIC LOON
    RED THROATED LOON
    ASHY STORM-PETREL
    BLACK-FOOTED ALBATROSS
    BULLER'S SHEARWATER
    BLACK-VENTED SHEARWATER (they're back! They were in a month ago but not since.)
    SOOTY SHEARWATER
    PINK-FOOTED SHEARWATER
    NORTHERN FULMAR
    MARBLED GODWIT (offshore about 8 mile)
    RED-NECKED PHALAROPE
    BONAPARTE'S GULL (first of the season for me)
    POMARINE JAEGER
    PARASITIC JAEGER
    SOUTH POLAR SKUA (6)!!!
    RHINOCEROS AUKLET
    CASSIN'S AUKLET
    TUFTED PUFFIN
    HUMPBACK WHALE (20)
    FIN WHALE  (2)
    PACIFIC WHITE-SIDED DOLPHIN
    MOLA MOLA
    BLUE SHARK (3)
    
    Any day with a TUFTED PUFFIN is a good day.  Also, six SOUTH POLAR SKUA were a real delight for folks.
    
    It's not to late to join us tomorrow on our 12-hour trip!  We will be going farther offshore (30+ miles) where there is currently a big temperature break.  We'd love to have you.
    
    Vist montereyseabirds.com or call (831)375-4658
    or
    Feel free to show up at the dock in the morning if you get this after business hours.  We depart at 7:30 from the Monterey Bay Whale Watch shop on Fisherman's Wharf.
    
    Good Birding,
    Mark Kudrav
    Monterey Seabirds
    Pacific Grove
  8. -back to top-
  9. Leach's Storm-Petrels in Monterey Bay--16 December LINK
    DATE: Dec 16, 2016 @ 9:32pm, 12 month(s) ago
    Hi All,
    
    Today was a great day at the Pt. Pinos Seawatch. The official count ended yesterday, but the weather conspired to draw Skye Haas and company in for an extra day. A moderate NW wind and some rain overnight dumped a bunch of Leach's Storm-Petrels in the bay today. We had birds in view most of the day, trickling west past the point. I was able to photography probably 20 individuals, and got pretty good video of a few. Will post that when I get time to download the images and process them this weekend. Also of note today was an adult female Brown Booby, different from the sub-adult seen yesterday here in the bay. A good early AM push of loons and a good late season scoter flight made the day a pleasure. Seawatch totals below from today:
    
    35 Brant (Black)
    20 Mallard
    2390 Surf Scoter
    1 White-winged Scoter
    3 Black Scoter
    17 Red-breasted Merganser
    54 Red-throated Loon
    9269 Pacific Loon
    17 Common Loon
    1 Horned Grebe
    1 Red-necked Grebe
    1 Eared Grebe
    1 Black-footed Albatross
    359 Northern Fulmar
    3 Pink-footed Shearwater
    12 Sooty Shearwater
    15 Short-tailed Shearwater
    32 Sooty/Short-tailed Shearwater
    1 Manx Shearwater
    1578 Black-vented Shearwater
    46 Leach's Storm-Petrel (Leach's)
    1 Brown Booby
    640 Brandt's Cormorant
    103 Pelagic Cormorant
    18 Double-crested Cormorant
    1110 Brown Pelican
    3 Great Egret
    12 Black Oystercatcher
    5 Whimbrel (Hudsonian)
    13 Black Turnstone
    8 Sanderling
    5 Red Phalarope
    8 Pomarine Jaeger
    1 Pomarine/Parasitic Jaeger
    1488 Common Murre
    2 Marbled Murrelet
    2 Ancient Murrelet
    151 Rhinoceros Auklet
    1 alcid sp.
    7 Black-legged Kittiwake
    20 Bonaparte's Gull
    1800 Heermann's Gull
    36 Mew Gull (American)
    2100 Western Gull
    2750 California Gull
    6 Herring Gull
    10 Thayer's Gull
    57 Glaucous-winged Gull
    8 Western x Glaucous-winged Gull (hybrid)
    
    --
    ===========
    Brian L. Sullivan
    
    eBird Project Leader
    www.ebird.org
    
    Photo Editor
    Birds of North America Online
    http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/BNA
    -------------------------------
  10. -back to top-
  11. Point Pinos Seawatch update LINK
    DATE: Nov 22, 2016, 1 year(s) ago
    Hi All,
    
    The Point Pinos Seawatch continues to record large numbers of Red Phalaropes, and Pacific Loons are really starting to push through. Compared with last year, tubenose diversity is higher, but Pacific Loon numbers are lagging (maybe just late). The big story is the Red Phalarope invasion, with massive numbers being seen daily off the Point. Yesterday there were more than 20,000 counted. These are really tough to count, with rafts of birds on the water, as well as streams of birds moving past. Complicated. Loons are easier and starting to become a spectacle. If you can get out the point, please join us! 
    
    Thanks to Monterey Audubon and BLM for sponsoring the count again this year. Hourly totals can be seen in eBird at this URL:
    
    https://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L109309
    
    Here are yesterday's totals, courtesy of our counter Skye Haas:
    
    84 Brant (Black)
    3 Lesser Scaup
    974 Surf Scoter
    2 White-winged Scoter
    12 Red-breasted Merganser
    206 Red-throated Loon
    18545 Pacific Loon
    21 Common Loon
    6 Northern Fulmar
    1 Pink-footed Shearwater
    24 Sooty Shearwater
    28 Short-tailed Shearwater
    10 Sooty/Short-tailed Shearwater
    4362 Black-vented Shearwater
    2 black-and-white shearwater sp.
    1 Ashy Storm-Petrel
    812 Brandt's Cormorant
    50 Pelagic Cormorant
    17 Double-crested Cormorant
    1226 Brown Pelican
    3 Snowy Egret
    8 Turkey Vulture
    1 Northern Harrier
    8 Black Oystercatcher
    1 Black-bellied Plover
    4 Whimbrel
    1 Marbled Godwit
    17 Black Turnstone
    8 Surfbird
    82 Sanderling
    20005 Red Phalarope
    1 Pomarine Jaeger
    1 Parasitic Jaeger
    2279 Common Murre
    4 Marbled Murrelet
    3 Ancient Murrelet
    130 Cassin's Auklet
    561 Rhinoceros Auklet
    2 Black-legged Kittiwake
    61 Bonaparte's Gull
    1185 Heermann's Gull
    19 Mew Gull (American)
    1435 Western Gull
    945 California Gull 
    7 Thayer's Gull
    11 Glaucous-winged Gull
    3 Western x Glaucous-winged Gull (hybrid)
    2 Herring x Glaucous-winged Gull (hybrid)
    13 Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)
    1 Anna's Hummingbird
    1 Northern Flicker (Red-shafted)
    1 Merlin
    2 Peregrine Falcon
    8 Black Phoebe
    1 Say's Phoebe
    2 California Scrub-Jay
    14 American Crow
    11 European Starling
    1 American Pipit
    2 Yellow-rumped Warbler
    14 Yellow-rumped Warbler (Audubon's)
    12 White-crowned Sparrow
    4 Golden-crowned Sparrow
    3 Song Sparrow 
    28 Red-winged Blackbird (California Bicolored) 
    48 Brewer's Blackbird
    15 House Finch
    
    --
    ===========
    Brian L. Sullivan
    
    eBird Project Leader
    www.ebird.org
    
    Photo Editor
    Birds of North America Online
    http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/BNA
    -------------------------------
  12. -back to top-
  13. Scarlet Tanager in Monterey LINK
    DATE: Nov 13, 2016 @ 4:31pm, 1 year(s) ago
    Today an adult male Scarlet Tanager, in fresh basic plumage, was found in flowering eucalyptus in San Carlos Cemetery in downtown Monterey. The old Catholic cemetery is just south of the public parking areas at Lake El Estero, with one entrance just across Pearl St., and extends southwards to Fremont. There are access gates on both Pearl and Fremont, and the 'arms' of El Estero form the west and east sides of this eBird Hot Spot [Monterey--San Carlos Cemetery]. The tanager was found, identified, and photographed by Steve Rovell and Larry & Carole Rose about 11 a.m., and continued to be seen into mid-afternoon. It was initially in tall flowering eucs midway along the N side of cemetery, but moved to two very tall flowering eucs in the NE corner, which is where it was seen by most local birders who went today. The eucs are full of "Audubon's" Warblers and there is one Nashville there also.
    
    The tanager is bright yellow with black wings and tail; it retains a few tiny red feathers at mid-belly, and a couple of scarlet feathers in black upperwing coverts. Multiple photos are in eBird already. If you see it or anything else of interest, please report to the local BirdBox (831) 250-4550, and to MBB and/or eBird.
    
    If you are from out of town, do stop by the Monterey Audubon sponsored Pt. Pinos seawatch just west of Crespi Pond at the Point, which is manned dawn to dusk daily to 15 Dec. Today there were untold thousands of Red Phalaropes, and major flights of BV Shearwater, Pacific Loon, and scoters.
    
    Good luck,
    
    Don Roberson
    
    Pacific Grove CA
    
    http://creagrus.home.montereybay.com/
  14. -back to top-
  15. Monterey Audubon 2016 Seawatch: PHALAROPES AND FRIGATEBIRD LINK
    DATE: Nov 3, 2016 @ 1:41pm, 1 year(s) ago
    November 1 marked the beginning of Monterey Audubon's second annual Seabird Seawatch from Point Pinos on the outermost Monterey Peninsula. This year, under the guidance of expert counter Skye Haas, and supported by counter Mark Kudrav, we will collect year-over-year data on all migratory seabirds passing by the Point Nov 1 - Dec 15, dawn to dusk. Last year we inventoried 250,000 Pacific Loons and 50,000 Surf Scoters. What will this year bring Well in just two days we've rack ed up multiple Leach's Storm-Petrels, Harlequin Ducks, thousands upon thousands of Red Phalarope, and....a frigatebird! This second-cycle Frigatebird seen yesterday afternoon, 2 November, was initially assumed to be a Magnificent Frigatebird but closer looks point to other possibilities including Great Frigatebird. Second-cycle frigates are notoriously hard to ID. Magnificent Frigatebirds off California are rare enough, but If this is a Great Frigatebird it could be just the 4th in North America. Incredibly, another Great Frigatebird was seen off the Salinas river mouth, Monterey County, in 1979. A photo of the frigatebird is on our facebook page, at https://www.facebook.com/monterey.audubon . We'll also post occasional updates from the count there, as well.
    
    Good birding,
    Blake Matheson Monterey Peninsula
  16. -back to top-
  17. Albacore fishing and migratory seabirds LINK
    DATE: Sep 29, 2016, 1 year(s) ago
    Debi,
    
    I am picking up on something that you said that is perhaps confusing As you note there are a bunch of seabird species that associate with the habitat of albacore, that warmer nutrient poor, very blue and clear water. However, several of the species that you mention are migrants that move through here irrelevant of where the albacore are, such as the jaegers, Sabine’s Gull, terns. I think the issue about detection through our area, is how far out they are and how concentrated the pulses of migration are. If they are moving through closer to shore, pelagic trips see more of them, if they are offshore we see fewer. But they are going through irrelevant of where the albacore and the fishing for albacore is going on. Obviously they capitalize on the resource of bait fish (often Pacific Saury) brought to the surface by foraging albacore, and may linger in areas where feeding is good, but the migration goes on. For some of these the migratory peak has passed already through our latitude in central California, such as for Long-tailed Jaeger, Common and Arctic terns. Tail end of fall migration is difficult to get a good grip on, as there are fewer trips in October, and even fewer in November. But for those that peak in September I think the data are pretty clear, the larger pulse is likely south of us.
    
    Buller’s Shearwaters are kind of a mystery, a fickle species with definite good years and bad years. They are associated with that offshore blue water, but their numbers and seemingly their distribution shifts radically from year to year. This also applies to the migratory pulse in Chile during February – March, where it appears that some years they are much easier to find than in others, although with fewer eyes out there that is difficult to determine with much confidence thus far. But so far, 2016 is a year where pelagic trips in California and farther north are not finding Buller’s in numbers anywhere it seems. Even in Washington State if you look at eBird data for 2016 vs pre 2016, birds per hour or any other metric, they are down this year, similarly so for Oregon. Now caveat is that October could bring in a big pulse and we are back to normal, and that is what I am certainly hoping for. But September numbers appear to be low compared to pre 2016 September numbers too. Birds per party hour in 2016 maxes out at 1/pph in early September, pre 2016 max is near 14, and in early September it is 4. It is a tad coarse to look at numbers like this, but I think a solid argument can be made that within the range of pelagic birding boats, this is a bad year for them thus far anywhere along the US coast. Perhaps they are just farther offshore this year Who knows
    
    Here are the links of eBird data to compare.
    
    Buller’s Shearwaters per hour Washington State – Pre 2016
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/GuideMespeciesCodes=bulshe < http://ebird.org/ebird/GuideMespeciesCodes=bulshe&reportType=species&bMonth=01&bYear=1900&eMonth=12&eYear=2016&parentState=US-WA&countries=US&states=US-WA&getLocations=states&continue.x=53&continue.y=3 > &reportType=species&bMonth=01&bYear=1900&eMonth=12&eYear=2016&parentState=US-WA&countries=US&states=US-WA&getLocations=states&continue.x=53&continue.y=3
    
    Buller’s Shearwaters per hour Washington State 2016
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/GuideMesrc=changeDate < http://ebird.org/ebird/GuideMesrc=changeDate&speciesCodes=bulshe&getLocations=states&states=US-WA&parentState=US-WA&reportType=species&monthRadio=on&bMonth=01&eMonth=12&bYear=2016&eYear=2016&continue.x=74&continue.y=10 > &speciesCodes=bulshe&getLocations=states&states=US-WA&parentState=US-WA&reportType=species&monthRadio=on&bMonth=01&eMonth=12&bYear=2016&eYear=2016&continue.x=74&continue.y=10
    
    Good birding,
    
    Alvaro
    
    Alvaro Jaramillo
    
    alvaro@...
    
    www.alvarosadventures.com
    
    From: CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com [mailto: CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of DEBRA SHEARWATER debi@... [CALBIRDS]
    
    Sent: Thursday, September 29, 2016 7:23 PM
    
    To: Calbirds < CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com >
    
    Subject: [CALBIRDS] Pelagic Trips: Sep 23, 24, 25 & Upcoming Trips
    
    Howdy, CALBirders,
    
    Shearwater Journeys held three successful pelagic trips in conjunction with the Monterey Bay Birding Festival on September 23, 24, and 25. Each day was a little bit different. At least one new species was added each day.
    
    On Sunday, we found a huge feeding aggregation of Brandt’s Cormorants, gulls, and Black-vented Shearwaters. They appeared to be feeding on small anchovies. It was quite a frenzy as the cormorants drove the fish in front of the flock with gulls noisily calling and swirling overhead, providing visual and auditory cues for seabirds in the surrounding areas. Like magic, hundreds of Black-vented Shearwaters began streaming toward the frantically feeding flock. However, another cue was provided by the pungent smell of fish— an olfactory cue! Using all three cues, birds flew in from all directions. Once the feeding was over a large fish oil slick was all that was left on the sea. This is something that I have witnessed several times over the past four decades.
    
    Now that the albacore fishing is winding down off Washington, the seabirds associated with that industry are showing up in numbers along our coast. All three jaeger species, South Polar Skuas, and Sabine’s Gulls, along with a trickle of Arctic Terns were the first ones to show up. Buller’s Shearwater numbers have increased in the past ten days. Flesh-footed Shearwaters are sure to follow. Scripps’s and Craveri’s Murrelets which also associate closely with albacore could show up, if there is any clear, blue water in our area. Albacore changed their migration pattern about a decade ago and now head to Oregon and Washington, mostly bypassing central California. The seabirds associated with them tend to follow, if conditions are right.
    
    Our upcoming trips departing from Monterey with spaces available are:
    
    OCTOBER 1 with Nick Levendosky, Alex Rinkert, Jim Holmes, Christian Schwarz, Debi Shearwater.
    
    OCTOBER 8 with Alex Rinkert, Tim Miller, Clay Kempf, Debi Shearwater
    
    OCTOBER 16 with Nick Levendosky, Alex Rinkert, Debi Shearwater
    
    And, from Half Moon Bay:
    
    OCTOBER 2 with Steve Tucker, Steve Hampton, Jim Holmes, Debi Shearwater
    
    Reservations: debi@...
    
    The birders who did all three trips (September 23, 24, 25) recorded the following species:
    
    PACIFIC LOON
    
    COMMON LOON
    
    BLACK-FOOTED ALBATROSS
    
    PINK-FOOTED SHEARWATER
    
    BULLER’S SHEARWATER
    
    SOOTY SHEARWATER
    
    BLACK-VENTED SHEARWATER
    
    ASHY STORM-PETREL
    
    BROWN PELICAN
    
    BRANDT’S CORMORANT
    
    PELAGIC CORMORANT
    
    DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT
    
    BLACK OYSTERCATCHER
    
    WHIMBREL
    
    BLACK TURNSTONE
    
    SURFBIRD
    
    RED-NECKED PHALAROPE
    
    SOUTH POLAR SKUA
    
    POMARINE JAEGER
    
    PARASITIC JAEGER
    
    LONG-TAILED JAEGER
    
    HEERMANN’S GULL
    
    CALIFORNIA GULL
    
    WESTERN GULL
    
    SABINE’S GULL
    
    ELEGANT TERN
    
    FORSTER’S TERN
    
    COMMON MURRE
    
    PIGEON GUILLEMOT
    
    CASSIN’S AUKLET
    
    RHINOCEROS AUKLET
    
    TUFTED PUFFIN
    
    BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERON
    
    PEREGRINE FALCON
    
    GREAT EGRET
    
    SNOWY EGRET
    
    HUMMINGBIRD SP.
    
    Marine mammals recorded on all three trips included:
    
    SEA OTTER
    
    CALIFORNIA SEA LION
    
    NORTHERN ELEPHANT SEAL
    
    NORTHERN FUR SEAL
    
    HARBOR SEAL
    
    HUMPBACK WHALE
    
    SHORT-BEAKED COMMON DOLPHIN
    
    RISSO’S DOLPHIN
    
    PACIFIC WHITE-SIDED DOLPHIN
    
    BOTTLENOSE DOLPHIN
    
    Also:
    
    OCEAN SUNFISH
    
    BLUE SHARK
    
    Many thanks to all of the birders who joined us. The leaders on these trips were: Nick Levendosky, Alex Rinkert, Scott Terrill, Linda Terrill, Dena Spatz, Tim Miller, Abe Borker, Christian Schwarz, Clay Kempf, and Debi Shearwater. All trips were entered into eBird following pelagic protocol.
    
    A recap of Shearwater Journeys’ September pelagic trips can be found here:
    
    http://shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com/2016/09/september-2016-pelagic-bonanza_11.html
    
    Living the Salt Life,
    
    Debi Shearwater
    
    DEBRA SHEARWATER
    
    Shearwater Journeys, Inc.
    
    PO Box 190
    
    Hollister, CA 95024
    
    831.637.8527
    
    debi@...
    
    < http://www.shearwaterjourneys.com > www.shearwaterjourneys.com
    
    < http://www.shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com > www.shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com
    
    Celebrating 41 Years of Seabirding with Shearwater Journeys
    
    Siberia’s Forgotten Coast Voyage: 27 June -10 July with Debi & nesting Spoon-billed Sandpipers
    
    Russia’s Ring of Fire: 30 May - 11 June
    
    Sea of Okhotsk: 12 - 23 June
    
    
  18. -back to top-
  19. Pelagic Trips: Sep 23, 24, 25 & Upcoming Trips LINK
    DATE: Sep 29, 2016, 1 year(s) ago
    Howdy, CALBirders,
    
    Shearwater Journeys held three successful pelagic trips in conjunction with the Monterey Bay Birding Festival on September 23, 24, and 25. Each day was a little bit different. At least one new species was added each day.
    
    On Sunday, we found a huge feeding aggregation of Brandt’s Cormorants, gulls, and Black-vented Shearwaters. They appeared to be feeding on small anchovies. It was quite a frenzy as the cormorants drove the fish in front of the flock with gulls noisily calling and swirling overhead, providing visual and auditory cues for seabirds in the surrounding areas. Like magic, hundreds of Black-vented Shearwaters began streaming toward the frantically feeding flock. However, another cue was provided by the pungent smell of fish— an olfactory cue! Using all three cues, birds flew in from all directions. Once the feeding was over a large fish oil slick was all that was left on the sea. This is something that I have witnessed several times over the past four decades.
    
    Now that the albacore fishing is winding down off Washington, the seabirds associated with that industry are showing up in numbers along our coast. All three jaeger species, South Polar Skuas, and Sabine’s Gulls, along with a trickle of Arctic Terns were the first ones to show up. Buller’s Shearwater numbers have increased in the past ten days. Flesh-footed Shearwaters are sure to follow. Scripps’s and Craveri’s Murrelets which also associate closely with albacore could show up, if there is any clear, blue water in our area. Albacore changed their migration pattern about a decade ago and now head to Oregon and Washington, mostly bypassing central California. The seabirds associated with them tend to follow, if conditions are right.
    
    Our upcoming trips departing from Monterey with spaces available are:
    OCTOBER 1 with Nick Levendosky, Alex Rinkert, Jim Holmes, Christian Schwarz, Debi Shearwater.
    OCTOBER 8 with Alex Rinkert, Tim Miller, Clay Kempf, Debi Shearwater
    OCTOBER 16 with Nick Levendosky, Alex Rinkert, Debi Shearwater
    And, from Half Moon Bay:
    OCTOBER 2 with Steve Tucker, Steve Hampton, Jim Holmes, Debi Shearwater
    Reservations: debi@...
    
    The birders who did all three trips (September 23, 24, 25) recorded the following species:
    
    PACIFIC LOON
    COMMON LOON
    BLACK-FOOTED ALBATROSS
    PINK-FOOTED SHEARWATER
    BULLER’S SHEARWATER
    SOOTY SHEARWATER
    BLACK-VENTED SHEARWATER
    ASHY STORM-PETREL
    BROWN PELICAN
    BRANDT’S CORMORANT
    PELAGIC CORMORANT
    DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT
    BLACK OYSTERCATCHER
    WHIMBREL
    BLACK TURNSTONE
    SURFBIRD
    RED-NECKED PHALAROPE
    SOUTH POLAR SKUA
    POMARINE JAEGER
    PARASITIC JAEGER
    LONG-TAILED JAEGER
    HEERMANN’S GULL
    CALIFORNIA GULL
    WESTERN GULL
    SABINE’S GULL
    ELEGANT TERN
    FORSTER’S TERN
    COMMON MURRE
    PIGEON GUILLEMOT
    CASSIN’S AUKLET
    RHINOCEROS AUKLET
    TUFTED PUFFIN
    BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERON
    PEREGRINE FALCON
    GREAT EGRET
    SNOWY EGRET
    HUMMINGBIRD SP.
    
    Marine mammals recorded on all three trips included:
    SEA OTTER
    CALIFORNIA SEA LION
    NORTHERN ELEPHANT SEAL
    NORTHERN FUR SEAL
    HARBOR SEAL
    HUMPBACK WHALE
    SHORT-BEAKED COMMON DOLPHIN
    RISSO’S DOLPHIN
    PACIFIC WHITE-SIDED DOLPHIN
    BOTTLENOSE DOLPHIN
    
    Also:
    OCEAN SUNFISH
    BLUE SHARK
    
    Many thanks to all of the birders who joined us. The leaders on these trips were: Nick Levendosky, Alex Rinkert, Scott Terrill, Linda Terrill, Dena Spatz, Tim Miller, Abe Borker, Christian Schwarz, Clay Kempf, and Debi Shearwater. All trips were entered into eBird following pelagic protocol.
    
    A recap of Shearwater Journeys’ September pelagic trips can be found here:
    http://shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com/2016/09/september-2016-pelagic-bonanza_11.html
    
    Living the Salt Life,
    Debi Shearwater
    
    DEBRA SHEARWATER
    Shearwater Journeys, Inc.
    PO Box 190
    Hollister, CA 95024
    831.637.8527
    debi@...
    www.shearwaterjourneys.com
    www.shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com
    
    Celebrating 41 Years of Seabirding with Shearwater Journeys
    Siberia ’s Forgotten Coast Voyage: 27 June -10 July with Debi & nesting Spoon-billed Sandpipers
    Russia ’s Ring of Fire: 30 May - 11 June
    Sea of Okhotsk: 12 - 23 June
  20. -back to top-
  21. Pelagic Cruise Results -- 4-5 May California and Oregon LINK
    DATE: May 8, 2016 @ 7:37am, 2 year(s) ago
    Hi Birders,
    
    About 28 birders were aboard the Ruby Princess for 2 days of deep water birding 4-5 May. On the 4th we were off southern Monterey County at daybreak, and ended the day off northern Menodcino County. Conditions started off calm, but ended with blustery north winds and sea fog. On the 5th we started in southern Curry County and our last checklist just barely got into Clatsop County. Conditions were rough, with 50 knot headwinds and big seas. I did eBird checklists every half hour for the two days, and all of those are in now and shared. Highlights were a slug of Pterodroma petrels that included 2 Hawaiian, 32 Cook's, and 18 Murphy's, the majority of which were found beginning in San Francisco County and continuing up through Marin, with scattered Murphy's the second day throughout Oregon. I think I've loaded in all my identifiable photos of these, but still have to load photos of common migrants. Parakeet Auklets were seen by one observer in Oregon waters, and those will be added independently by him since the rest of us missed them. 
    
    Here are some of the highlight checklists:
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S29435292
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S29435309
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S29451212
    
    Trip Summary:
    
    eBird Checklist Summary for: May 4, 2016, 4:20 AM to May 5, 2016, 11:30 PM
    
    Number of Checklists: 53
    Number of Taxa: 41
    
    1 Pacific Loon
    1 Common Loon
    2 loon sp.
    4 Laysan Albatross
    451 Black-footed Albatross
    40 Northern Fulmar
    18 Murphy's Petrel
    2 Hawaiian Petrel
    32 Cook's Petrel
    1 Pterodroma sp.
    136 Pink-footed Shearwater
    3895 Sooty Shearwater
    48 Fork-tailed Storm-Petrel
    402 Leach's Storm-Petrel
    55 Ashy Storm-Petrel
    9 storm-petrel sp.
    4 Dunlin
    30 peep sp.
    24 Short-billed/Long-billed Dowitcher
    452 Red-necked Phalarope
    80 Red Phalarope
    59 phalarope sp.
    1 shorebird sp.
    1 South Polar Skua
    12 Pomarine Jaeger
    7 Parasitic Jaeger
    2 Long-tailed Jaeger
    19 jaeger sp.
    165 Common Murre
    71 Cassin's Auklet
    50 Rhinoceros Auklet
    12 alcid sp.
    234 Sabine's Gull
    18 Western Gull
    2 Herring Gull
    1 Glaucous-winged Gull
    6 gull sp. 
    8 Arctic Tern
    2 Common/Arctic Tern
    1 tern sp.
    1 Eurasian Collared-Dove (road the boat for the whole first day)
    
    Checklist Locations:
    Checklists included in this summary:
    (1): 35.7941x-122.1718 - May 4, 2016, 5:57 AM
    Date: May 4, 2016, 5:57 AM
    (2): 35.9275x-122.3139 - May 4, 2016, 6:30 AM
    Date: May 4, 2016, 6:30 AM
    (3): 36.0288x-122.4304 - May 4, 2016, 6:57 AM
    Date: May 4, 2016, 6:57 AM
    (4): 36.1827x-122.5630 - May 4, 2016, 7:33 AM
    Date: May 4, 2016, 7:33 AM
    (5): 36.3443x-122.7072 - May 4, 2016, 8:11 AM
    Date: May 4, 2016, 8:11 AM
    (6): 36.4694x-122.8023 - May 4, 2016, 8:38 AM
    Date: May 4, 2016, 8:38 AM
    (7): 36.5631x-122.8752 - May 4, 2016, 8:58 AM
    Date: May 4, 2016, 8:58 AM
    (8): 36.7546x-123.0254 - May 4, 2016, 9:38 AM
    Date: May 4, 2016, 9:33 AM
    (9): 36.8633x-123.1068 - May 4, 2016, 10:01 AM
    Date: May 4, 2016, 10:01 AM
    (10): 36.9995x-123.2126 - May 4, 2016, 10:29 AM
    Date: May 4, 2016, 10:29 AM
    (11): 37.1376x-123.3179 - May 4, 2016, 10:59 AM
    Date: May 4, 2016, 10:59 AM
    (12): 37.3246x-123.4624 - May 4, 2016, 11:39 AM
    Date: May 4, 2016, 11:30 AM
    (13): 37.5285x-123.6214 - May 4, 2016, 12:22 PM
    Date: May 4, 2016, 12:10 PM
    (14): 37.5847x-123.6652 - May 4, 2016, 12:34 PM
    Date: May 4, 2016, 12:34 PM
    (15): 37.6934x-123.7496 - May 4, 2016, 12:58 PM
    Date: May 4, 2016, 12:58 PM
    (16): 37.9116x-123.8752 - May 4, 2016, 1:41 PM
    Date: May 4, 2016, 1:41 PM
    (17): 38.0271x-123.9324 - May 4, 2016, 2:05 PM
    Date: May 4, 2016, 2:05 PM
    (18): 38.1549x-123.9958 - May 4, 2016, 2:32 PM
    Date: May 4, 2016, 2:32 PM
    (19): 38.2723x-124.0544 - May 4, 2016, 2:57 PM
    Date: May 4, 2016, 2:57 PM
    (20): 38.4158x-124.1262 - May 4, 2016, 3:28 PM
    Date: May 4, 2016, 3:28 PM
    (21): 38.5518x-124.1842 - May 4, 2016, 3:57 PM
    Date: May 4, 2016, 3:57 PM
    (22): 38.6986x-124.2448 - May 4, 2016, 4:27 PM
    Date: May 4, 2016, 4:27 PM
    (23): 38.8920x-124.3226 - May 4, 2016, 5:10 PM
    Date: May 4, 2016, 5:10 PM
    (24): 38.9920x-124.3621 - May 4, 2016, 5:33 PM
    Date: May 4, 2016, 5:33 PM
    (25): 39.1189x-124.4048 - May 4, 2016, 5:59 PM
    Date: May 4, 2016, 5:59 PM
    (26): 39.2764x-124.4532 - May 4, 2016, 6:30 PM
    Date: May 4, 2016, 6:30 PM
    (27): 42.2154x-124.8933 - May 5, 2016, 6:04 AM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 6:00 AM
    (28): 42.3154x-124.9039 - May 5, 2016, 6:30 AM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 6:30 AM
    (29): 42.4338x-124.9123 - May 5, 2016, 7:00 AM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 7:00 AM
    (30): 42.5558x-124.9229 - May 5, 2016, 7:30 AM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 7:30 AM
    (31): 42.6747x-124.9332 - May 5, 2016, 7:59 AM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 7:59 AM
    (32): 42.8072x-124.9431 - May 5, 2016, 8:29 AM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 8:29 AM
    (33): 42.9487x-124.9496 - May 5, 2016, 9:00 AM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 9:00 AM
    (34): 43.0857x-124.9609 - May 5, 2016, 9:30 AM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 9:30 AM
    (35): 43.2335x-124.9702 - May 5, 2016, 10:01 AM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 10:01 AM
    (36): 43.3741x-124.9795 - May 5, 2016, 10:30 AM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 10:30 AM
    (37): 43.5298x-124.9884 - May 5, 2016, 11:00 AM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 11:00 AM
    (38): 43.6834x-125.0002 - May 5, 2016, 11:30 AM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 11:30 AM
    (39): 43.9165x-125.0144 - May 5, 2016, 12:16 PM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 12:16 PM
    (40): 43.9911x-125.0204 - May 5, 2016, 12:31 PM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 12:31 PM
    (41): 44.1383x-125.0325 - May 5, 2016, 1:00 PM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 1:00 PM
    (42): 44.2849x-125.0397 - May 5, 2016, 1:30 PM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 1:30 PM
    (43): 44.4270x-125.0489 - May 5, 2016, 1:58 PM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 1:58 PM
    (44): 44.6066x-125.0613 - May 5, 2016, 2:34 PM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 2:34 PM
    (45): 44.7716x-125.0731 - May 5, 2016, 3:06 PM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 3:00 PM
    (46): 44.8839x-125.0805 - May 5, 2016, 3:28 PM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 3:28 PM
    (47): 45.0362x-125.0932 - May 5, 2016, 3:59 PM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 3:59 PM
    (48): 45.1868x-125.1024 - May 5, 2016, 4:28 PM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 4:28 PM
    (49): 45.3464x-125.1137 - May 5, 2016, 5:01 PM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 5:01 PM
    (50): 45.4737x-125.1217 - May 5, 2016, 5:28 PM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 5:28 PM
    (51): 45.6154x-125.1356 - May 5, 2016, 5:57 PM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 5:57 PM
    (52): 45.7684x-125.1430 - May 5, 2016, 6:29 PM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 6:29 PM
    (53): 45.9707x-125.1587 - May 5, 2016, 7:10 PM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 7:00 PM
    
    This trip summary was created using the eBird app for iPhone and iPad.
    See eBird for more information.
    
    --
    ===========
    Brian L. Sullivan
    
    eBird Project Leader
    www.ebird.org
    
    Photo Editor
    Birds of North America Online
    http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/BNA
    -------------------------------
  22. -back to top-
  23. MAS Seawatch Report LINK
    DATE: Nov 17, 2015 @ 9:58am, 2 year(s) ago
    The MAS Seawatch Program now enters its third week. In our first two weeks under Tony Leukering's leadership, we have recorded 94,063 individual seabirds. Thus far our more numerous species of interest have totaled: SURF SCOTER (27,192); CASSIN'S AUKLET (9,193); BONAPARTE'S GULL (1,484); COMMON MURRE (2,525); HEERMAN'S GULL (5,325); BLACK-VENTED SHEARWATER (24,804); ELEGANT TERN (1,359) and BROWN PELICAN (4,376).
    
    PACIFIC LOON, perhaps the major focus of the effort, now totals 8,283. Notably the week over week daily increase from Nov. 7 (69) to Nov. 14 (3221) was 4600% and confirms we are entering the heart of that migration.
    
    Interesting scarce species have included BLACK SCOTER (10), LONG-TAILED DUCK (1), MANX SHEARWATER (3), SHORT-TAILED SHEARWATER (6), CACKLING GOOSE (106), GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE (3).
    
    Rarities of consequence have included: BROWN BOOBY, ROYAL TERN (2) and GUADALUPE MURRELET.
    
    Come see us at the Point!
    
    Blake Matheson
    President, Monterey Audubon
  24. -back to top-
  25. October 4 Half Moon Bay Pelagic Trip LINK
    DATE: Oct 6, 2015 @ 11:24am, 2 year(s) ago
    Howdy, CALBirders,
    Shearwater Journeys' October 4, 2015 pelagic trip departing from Half Moon Bay turned out to be a fabulous day. Folks who joined us on both this trip and the Monterey Bay trip, October 3rd, added a number of new species for their total list. These included: WILSON'S STORM-PETREL (3, excellent views), FORK-TAILED STORM-PETREL (1, excellent views), SOUTH POLAR SKUA (1), and MARBLED MURRELETS (7).
    
    Additional highlights included a scattering of both ASHY and BLACK STORM-PETRELS; NORTHERN/PACIFIC FULMAR; BLACK-FOOTED ALBATROSS; an offshore PEREGRINE FALCON; a late, or wintering PIGEON GUILLEMOT; CASSIN'S and RHINOCEROS AUKLETS.
    
    Marine mammal highlights included: 1200 LONG-BEAKED COMMON DOLPHINS traveling in one gigantic herd (herds of up to 10,000 are not unknown in Southern California); 3 HUMPBACK WHALES and 2 STELLER'S SEA LIONS.
    
    A great many of the birders made both trips this past weekend with Shearwater Journeys. Those who did wracked up a long list of seabirds and marine mammals. Many thanks to the birders who joined us! The leaders on this pelagic trip were: Steve Hampton, Will Brooks, Alex Rinkert, Annie Schmidt, Christian Schwarz, and Debi Shearwater.
    
    UPCOMING TRIPS:
    2 SPACES are available on out OCTOBER 11 HALF MOON BAY trip. Spaces are available on our OCTOBER 10 MONTEREY BAY trip.
    Please email me for a reservation.
    
    The complete species list for October 4, 2015 Half Moon Bay follows:
    
    RED-THROATED LOON- 3
    PACIFIC LOON- 1
    EARED GREBE- 20
    WESTERN GREBE- 30
    BLACK-FOOTED ALBATROSS- 3
    NORTHERN/PACIFIC FULMAR- 35
    PINK-FOOTED SHEARWATER- 300
    SOOTY SHEARWATER- 100
    SHORT-TAILED SHEARWATER- 2
    WILSON'S STORM-PETREL- 3
    FORK-TAILED STORM-PETREL- 1
    ASHY STORM-PETREL- 25
    BLACK STORM-PETREL- 35
    BROWN PELICAN- 2000
    BRANDT'S CORMORANT- 1000
    DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT- 500
    SURF SCOTER- 30
    BLUE-WINGED TEAL- 7
    BLACK OYSTERCATCHER- 7
    WHIMBREL- 1
    MARBLED GODWIT- 3
    BLACK TURNSTONE- 15
    SURFBIRD- 12
    WILLET- 10
    RED-NECKED PHALAROPE- 10
    RED PHALAROPE- 15
    SOUTH POLAR SKUA- 1
    POMARINE JAEGER- 2
    PARASITIC JAEGER- 4
    CALIFORNIA GULL- 50
    HERRING GULL- 2
    WESTERN GULL- 250
    GLAUCOUS-WINGED GULL- 1
    ELEGANT TERN- 80
    COMMON MURRE- 650
    PIGEON GUILLEMOT- 1
    MARBLED MURRELET- 7
    CASSIN'S AUKLET- 20
    RHINOCEROS AUKLET- 3
    PEREGRINE FALCON- 1
    WARBLER SP. - 1
    AMERICAN PIPIT- 1
    WESTERN MEADOWLARK- 1
    SEA OTTER- 1
    CALIFORNIA SEA LION- 50
    STELLER'S SEA LION- 2
    HUMPBACK WHALE- 3
    LONG-BEAKED COMMON DOLPHIN- 1200
    OCEAN SUNFISH- 10
    SHARK SP.- 2
    
    A gale had blown through the area the night prior to this trip. Seas were subsiding throughout the day — so much so that we looked, again, for the marbled murrelets in the afternoon with great success! Again, the high swell made it all but impossible to search for flocks of storm-petrels, but we enjoyed close views of the storm-petrels we did find!
    
    Living the Salt Life,
    Debi Shearwater
    
    DEBRA SHEARWATER
    Shearwater Journeys, Inc.
    PO Box 190
    Hollister, CA 95024
    831.637.8527
    debi@...
    www.shearwaterjourneys.com
    www.shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com
    
    Celebrating 40 Years of Seabirding with Shearwater Journeys
    
    
  26. -back to top-
  27. OCT 3 MONTEREY BAY PELAGIC TRIP LINK
    DATE: Oct 6, 2015 @ 8:22am, 2 year(s) ago
    Howdy, CAL Birders,
    Shearwater Journeys' guests and leaders enjoyed an unforgettable Monterey Bay pelagic trip on October 3. Highlights included: excellent views of one LEACH'S, BLACK and ASHY STORM-PETRELS approximately 4 miles off Point Pinos; one BROWN BOOBY flew by; 5 species of SHEARWATERS: PINK-FOOTED, BULLER'S, SOOTY, SHORT-TAILED, and BLACK-VENTED; POMARINE and PARASITIC JAEGERS; SABINE'S GULL; BLACK-FOOTED ALBATROSS; PACIFIC FULMAR; and excellent views of CASSIN'S and RHINOCEROS AUKLETS. Owing to the large swells, no storm-petrel flocks were found. Rather, they were scattered thinly. This is the first time in many years that I've seen a LEACH'S STORM-PETREL at Monterey Bay, and certainly the closest to shore record. Perhaps, it was blown in by a strong gale that was forecast to hit later this day. By the time we were headed to the harbor, it had started to blow. So we made it just in time!
    
    The marine mammal highlight of the day was following 17 to 21 KILLER WHALES for 15 km, while they were spy-hopping, breaching, and tail-slapping. One adult killer whale was very "randy" presenting a large, pink penis on numerous occasions. While it appeared that they might be mating, I do not think this was the case because this whale was most likely with his mother or auntie and possibly, a sibling. (This was the first group of three killer whales that we encountered). They seemed to be engaged in a lot of social activity.
    
    Many thanks to all of the birders, from near and far, who joined Shearwater Journeys on this day! The leaders on this trip included: Tim Miller, Abe Borker, Alex Rinkert, Christian Schwarz, Dena Spatz, Jennifer Green, and Debi Shearwater.
    
    The complete species list follows (all sightings are for Monterey County):
    
    PACIFIC LOON- 4
    COMMON LOON- 2
    BLACK-FOOTED ALBATROSS- 34
    NORTHERN/PACIFIC FULMAR- 50
    PINK-FOOTED SHEARWATER- 450
    BULLER'S SHEARWATER- 3
    SOOTY SHEARWATER- 135
    SHORT-TAILED SHEARWATER- 2
    BLACK-VENTED SHEARWATER- 250
    *LEACH'S STORM-PETREL- 1
    ASHY STORM-PETREL- 70
    BLACK STORM-PETREL- 18
    *BROWN BOOBY- 1
    BROWN PELICAN- 70
    BRANDT'S CORMORANT- 700
    DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT- 3
    PELAGIC CORMORANT- 3
    BLACK OYSTERCATCHER- 2
    BLACK TURNSTONE- 5
    SURFBIRD- 2
    RED-NECKED PHALAROPE- 25
    RED PHALAROPE- 2
    POMARINE JAEGER- 9
    PARASITIC JAEGER- 12
    HEERMANN'S GULL- 25
    CALIFORNIA GULL- 100
    WESTERN GULL- 150
    SABINE'S GULL- 3
    ELEGANT TERN- 375
    COMMON MURRE- 100
    CASSIN'S AUKLET- 140 (our highest count yet for this season)
    RHINOCEROS AUKLET- 30
    PEREGRINE FALCON- 1, on the red and white radio tower along Cannery Row
    SEA OTTER- 4
    CALIFORNIA SEA LION- 60
    NORTHERN ELEPHANT SEAL- 1
    HUMPBACK WHALE- 3
    LONG-BEAKED COMMON DOLPHIN- 50
    KILLER WHALE- 17 to 21, difficult to get an accurate count due to their behavior; at least 4 adult males.
    OCEAN SUNFISH- 3
    SHARK SP.- 1
    
    Shearwater Journeys' OCTOBER 11 MONTEREY BAY pelagic trip has a few spaces still available. Please email me at: debi@... for a reservation.
    
    Living the Salt Life,
    Debi Shearwater
    
    DEBRA SHEARWATER
    Shearwater Journeys, Inc.
    PO Box 190
    Hollister, CA 95024
    831.637.8527
    debi@...
    www.shearwaterjourneys.com
    www.shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com
    
    Celebrating 40 Years of Seabirding with Shearwater Journeys
    
    
  28. -back to top-
  29. RE: [CALBIRDS] SEP 27 MONTEREY PELAGIC REPORT LINK
    DATE: Sep 29, 2015 @ 9:11pm, 2 year(s) ago
    Debi,
    Hey, are there any photos of the Least Storm-Petrels anywhere, just curious
    Thanks,
    Alvaro
    
    Alvaro Jaramillo
    alvaro@...
    www.alvarosadventures.com
    
    From: CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of DEBRA SHEARWATER debi@... [CALBIRDS]Sent: Monday, September 28, 2015 8:26 PMTo: Calbirds <CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com>Cc: countybirders@yahoogroups.comSubject: [CALBIRDS] SEP 27 MONTEREY PELAGIC REPORT
    
    Howdy, CAL Birders,
    
    Shearwater Journeys' September 27, 2015 Monterey Bay pelagic trip tallied 14 species of tubenoses. Highlights included: excellent views of two different MANX SHEARWATERS, sitting on the water amidst 5220 BLACK-VENTED SHEARWATERS. Other shearwaters included: FLESH-FOOTED, SOOTY, BULLER'S, SHORT-TAILED. Owing to the calmer seas on this trip, we found rafts of storm-petrels sitting on the water. Flocks ranged from 20 to 50 to 500 storm-petrels and included FIVE SPECIES: BLACK, ASHY, LEAST, WILSON'S, and FORK-TAILED. In all, we tallied 14 species of tubenoses and enjoyed a beautiful day at sea. We covered both Monterey and Santa Cruz Counties.
    
    Many thanks to all of the birders who joined us from near and far for this trip. The leaders on this date were: Nick Levendosky, Alex Rinkert, Joel Barrett, Linda Terrill, Scott Terrill, and Debi Shearwater.
    
    We operated 15 pelagic trips during 23 days of September from Monterey, Half Moon Bay, and Bodega Bay. It was quite amazing to be out there so many days and see how the species changed with the ebb and flow of warm water. Terrafin is showing a broad wall of warm water out about the 1000 fathom line (beyond the reach of one day trips). However, seabirds and other marine animals have been moving in ahead of this front. (Black-vented Shearwaters, Least Storm-Petrels, Loggerhead Turtle, Bonito). At this time the strongest and coldest water is nearshore, just off the Seal Beach along Highway One (Big Sur) where birders are reporting large concentrations of Sooty Shearwaters — this is absolutely right on the mark!
    
    During October, we have five trips scheduled. Of those, two are sold out. Spaces are still available on the following:
    
    OCTOBER 3 Monterey with leaders: Scott Terrill, Linda Terrill, Abe Borker, Dena Spatz, Tim Miller, Alex Rinkert. Jennifer Green, Debi Shearwater.
    
    OCTOBER 10 Monterey with leaders: David Vander Pluym, Lauren Harter, Todd McGrath, Alex Rinkert, Jennifer Green, Debi Shearwater.
    
    OCTOBER 11 Half Moon Bay with leaders: Jim Holmes, Tim Miller, Will Brooks, David Vander Pluym, Lauren Harter, Todd McGrath, Marissa Ortega-Welch, Debi Shearwater
    
    October 4 Half Moon Bay and October 18 Great White Shark trips are sold out. Wait list only.
    
    The complete species list follows below.
    
    PACIFIC LOON- 1
    
    EARED GREBE- 14
    
    BLACK-FOOTED ALBATROSS- 15
    
    PACIFIC FULMAR- 36
    
    PINK-FOOTED SHEARWATER- 90
    
    FLESH-FOOTED SHEARWATER- 1
    
    BULLER'S SHEARWATER- 4
    
    SOOTY SHEARWATER- 4615
    
    SHORT-TAILED SHEARWATER- 1
    
    MANX SHEARWATER- 2
    
    BLACK-VENTED SHEARWATER- 5220
    
    WILSON'S STORM-PETREL- 2
    
    FORK-TAILED STORM-PETREL- 2
    
    ASHY STORM-PETREL- 536
    
    BLACK STORM-PETREL- 83
    
    LEAST STORM-PETREL- 3
    
    BROWN PELICAN- 40
    
    BRANDT'S CORMORANT- 40
    
    DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT- 1
    
    PELAGIC CORMORANT- 4
    
    BLACK TURNSTONE- 2
    
    SURFBIRD- 3
    
    RED-NECKED PHALAROPE- 58
    
    RED PHALAROPE- 18
    
    POMARINE JAEGER- 9
    
    PARASITIC JAEGER- 4
    
    HEERMANN'S GULL- 50
    
    CALIFORNIA GULL- 310
    
    WESTERN GULL- 410
    
    SABINE'S GULL- 3
    
    ELEGANT TERN- 55
    
    COMMON TERN- 1
    
    COMMON MURRE- 55
    
    CASSIN'S AUKLET- 83
    
    RHINOCEROS AUKLET- 20
    
    PEREGRINE FALCON- 1, on the red and white radio tower along Cannery Row
    
    SEA OTTER- 5
    
    CALIFORNIA SEA LION- 5-
    
    STELLER'S SEA LION- 1
    
    NORTHERN ELEPHANT SEAL- 1
    
    HARBOR SEAL- 5
    
    HUMPBACK WHALE- 5
    
    SHORT-BEAKED COMMON DOLPHIN- 20
    
    LONG-BEAKED COMMON DOLPHIN- 800
    
    OCEAN SUNFISH- 2
    
    The turtle we saw on the September 25, 2015 Monterey Bay trip has been positively identified from images as a LOGGERHEAD TURTLE. Input was given by Robert L. Pitman on the ID. I have never seen a Loggerhead Turtle this far north, although they are known to range as far north as Alaska.
    
    Living the Salt Life,
    
    Debi Shearwater
    
    DEBRA SHEARWATER
    
    Shearwater Journeys, Inc.
    
    PO Box 190
    
    Hollister, CA 95024
    
    831.637.8527
    
    debi@...
    
    www.shearwaterjourneys.com
    
    www.shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com
    
    Celebrating 40 Years of Seabirding with Shearwater Journeys
    
    
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