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   Nazca Booby
Nazca Booby
Sula granti


   Nazca Booby (Sula granti) - NABO (recent eBird sightings, view CBRC records)

  1. Re: [CALBIRDS] Re: [OrangeCountyBirding] Apparent Nazca Booby at Dana Point - Nov 27 LINK
    DATE: Nov 27, 2017, 15 day(s) ago
    The bird is back at end of breakwater at 2:20 pm. Dana Point Harbor.
    
    David and Rich Trissel
    San Diego, CA
    
    On Nov 27, 2017, at 12:58 PM, Tom Benson Thomasabenson@... [CALBIRDS] < CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com > wrote:
    
     The Nazca Booby just flew from the breakwater at 12:45 pm. It is foraging just outside the breakwater for a few minutes but is very distant and in bad light.
    
    Tom Benson
    San Bernardino, CA
    
    -------- Original message --------
    From: " Thomasabenson@... [OrangeCountyBirding]" < OrangeCountyBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com >
    Date: 11/27/17 11:02 AM (GMT-08:00)
    To: orangecountybirding@yahoogroups.com
    Subject: [OrangeCountyBirding] Apparent Nazca Booby at Dana Point - Nov 27
    
    Brian Daniels is reporting an apparent NAZCA BOOBY at the end of the breakwater at Dana Point Harbor at 10:45 AM today, November 27. This is thought to be the same bird that was seen on a boat in Newport Harbor last week (or two weeks ago, whenever it was).
    
    Tom Benson
    San Bernardino, CA
  2. -back to top-
  3. Re: [OrangeCountyBirding] Apparent Nazca Booby at Dana Point - Nov 27 LINK
    DATE: Nov 27, 2017 @ 12:58pm, 14 day(s) ago
    The Nazca Booby just flew from the breakwater at 12:45 pm. It is foraging just outside the breakwater for a few minutes but is very distant and in bad light.
    
    Tom Benson
    San Bernardino, CA
    
    -------- Original message --------
    From: "Thomasabenson@... [OrangeCountyBirding]"
    Date: 11/27/17 11:02 AM (GMT-08:00)
    To: orangecountybirding@yahoogroups.com
    Subject: [OrangeCountyBirding] Apparent Nazca Booby at Dana Point - Nov 27
    
    Brian Daniels is reporting an apparent NAZCA BOOBY at the end of the breakwater at Dana Point Harbor at 10:45 AM today, November 27. This is thought to be the same bird that was seen on a boat in Newport Harbor last week (or two weeks ago, whenever it was).
    
    Tom Benson
    San Bernardino, CA
  4. -back to top-
  5. Fwd: [OrangeCountyBirding] Apparent Nazca Booby at Dana Point - Nov 27 LINK
    DATE: Nov 27, 2017 @ 11:17am, 14 day(s) ago
    -------- Original message --------
    From: "Thomasabenson@... [OrangeCountyBirding]"
    Date: 11/27/17 11:02 AM (GMT-08:00)
    To: orangecountybirding@yahoogroups.com
    Subject: [OrangeCountyBirding] Apparent Nazca Booby at Dana Point - Nov 27
    
    Brian Daniels is reporting an apparent NAZCA BOOBY at the end of the breakwater at Dana Point Harbor at 10:45 AM today, November 27. This is thought to be the same bird that was seen on a boat in Newport Harbor last week (or two weeks ago, whenever it was).
    
    Tom Benson
    San Bernardino, CA
  6. -back to top-
  7. Nazca Booby (Orange Co) and a very VERY late report of a Swallow-tailed Gull from Bodega Bay... LINK
    DATE: Nov 19, 2017 @ 7:23pm, 22 day(s) ago
    A third cycle NAZCA BOOBY was photographed on the boat "Thunderbird" out of Daveys Locker in Newport Beach, CA last night (18 NOV). The bird landed on the boat at sea and stayed on the boat into the harbor.  The boat returned to sea at 9pm on 18 NOV and is due to return to harbor at 4am Monday morning 20 NOV.  Local searches of the surrounding area this morning were unsuccessful.
    
    A belated report of a SWALLOW-TAILED GULL was posted to Facebook today with previously unidentified photos. The bird was photographed with Western Gulls and was reported to be on Bodega Head (Bodega Bay), CA on October 5th 2017.
    
    Jeff Bray
    Irvine, CA
  8. -back to top-
  9. Pelagic trip out of Ventura with Island Packers on 7 Oct 2017 LINK
    DATE: Sep 25, 2017 @ 1:30pm, 3 month(s) ago
    Hi All
    
    This
    is a reminder that Island Packers is offering an 11-hour deepwater
    pelagic trip from the Ventura Harbor at 7 am on Saturday October 7. This
    trip will allow us to get to offshore waters beyond the reach of most
    day trips where we will
    have a chance to see a number of outstanding pelagic birds and marine
    mammals. The waters around the northern
    Channel Islands can be very productive during the fall when hundreds
    (sometimes thousands) of shearwaters crowd into the inter-island gaps. We will be looking through flocks of Black-vented,
    Pink-footed, and Sooty Shearwaters for Buller's, Flesh-footed (uncommon),
    and Manx (rare) Shearwaters. This is peak season for seabird diversity
    so in addition to the species already mentioned, Black-footed Albatross,
    Black and Ashy Storm-Petrels, Cassin's and Rhinoceros Auklets, and
    Pomarine and Long-tailed Jaegers are all possible. It is a good time of
    year for South Polar Skua, Sabine's Gull, and Arctic Tern. Recent trips
    near the islands have found Blue-footed Booby (2013-2014, 2016) and Brown
    Booby (2013-2017). There is also a potential for sought-after species
    like Cooks' Petrel, Red-billed Tropicbird, Least Storm-Petrel, Townsend's Storm-Petrel, Guadalupe Murrelet, and
    Craveri's Murrelet. The last 4 years have been exceptional for Craveri's
    Murrelet off southern California and with warm water continuing, our chances to find this elusive species may be good. We saw approximately 45 Craveri's Murrelets on our recent July trip from Ventura! In addition, there was a Nazca Booby seen on a pelagic trip out of San Diego this weekend so anything is possible out there. We
    will decide what our offshore destinations will be after reviewing
    oceanographic conditions at the time of the trip, which will help
    determine where birds and other marine life may be present.
    
    The trip will be on an ultra-fast catamaran that features a
    spacious and comfortable cabin, galley, and excellent viewing from
    both the upper and lower decks. A full contingent of outstanding seabird
    leaders will be present to make sure we see all that is out there. The
    Captain and crew know how to run birding trips and are enthusiastic
    and helpful.In addition, we work hard to creep up on birds and get
    them in the right light for photographers.
    
    Trips can be booked over the phone by calling (805) 642-1393 or online at www.IslandPackers.comby
    clicking the Reserve Trip tab, select the Special Trips tab, and select
    your desired departure. The cost of the trip is $170 per adult.
    
    Hope to see you at sea!
    
    Dave Pereksta
    Ventura, CA
  10. -back to top-
  11. Fwd: [MBBIRDS] More on the Pt. Pinos booby LINK
    DATE: Jul 21, 2017 @ 5:00pm, 5 month(s) ago
    Perhaps this didn't post right
    
    Begin forwarded message:
    
    From: Don Roberson < creagrus@... >
    
    Date: July 21, 2017 3:54:11 PM PDT
    
    To: Mbbirds Bay Birds < mbbirds@... >
    
    Cc: calbirds < calbirds@yahoogroups.com >
    
    Subject: [MBBIRDS] More on the Pt. Pinos booby
    
    Thanks to the generosity of Bill Hill, Beth Hamel, Cooper Scollan, Fred Hochstaedter, and Blake Matheson , I've been able to put together of page of revealing photos of Slash -- our subadult Masked/Nazca Booby at Pt. Pinos currently -- amidst a discussion of potential identification points. The bird was still present this morning and will hopefully hang around a while.
    
    The page is at
    
    http://creagrus.home.montereybay.com/MTYbirdsBOOB.html
    
    Thanks,
    
    Don Roberson
    
    Pacific Grove CA
    
    http://creagrus.home.montereybay.com/
    
    --
    
    For Monterey Rare Bird alerts call 831-250-4550
    
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    Don Roberson
    
    Pacific Grove CA
    
    http://creagrus.home.montereybay.com/
  12. -back to top-
  13. Re: [CALBIRDS] Fwd: [MBBIRDS] Booby still present at Pt Pinos at 9:10 am LINK
    DATE: Jul 20, 2017 @ 12:33pm, 5 month(s) ago
    I’d like to make a few informal comments on this booby.
    
    In preparing a submission for the CBRC a few years ago, I did a non-expert but careful study of museum specimens of first- and second-cycle Masked and Nazca boobies, about 20 individuals of each, some in hand, and some in photos provided by curators of several ornithology collections [as well as many other photos online]. This is a small sample, and only suggestive for further research.And further research may disprove my hypotheses.
    
    I noted a number of things to look for as possible identification criteria, and some caveats on others.
    
    I hope as the CBRC does, as it announced, pursue further research and reaches out to experts on these species that this is something that others can look at and prove or disprove.
    
    First of all, I found that bill shape in immature birds was not a useful criterion. I did not do really detailed analyses with calipers, but differences in bill shape, though possibly suggestive, did not reach the level of statistical significance.However, trainer ornithologists with calipers, doing the proper measurements with far greater accuracy than I did, may find some differences, but I do not think that perceived bill differences would be reliable in the field as an identification criteron.
    
    Second, I found that bill color in photos is subject to a wide variety of photographic artifacts where the camera or computer interprets color erroneously. Photos of the bill of a given bird can look gray in one photo and yellow or pinkish in another taken only a few seconds later. [A reminder: the bill on a Nazca booby should turn orange proximally [closest to the body] before it turns orange distally [furthest from the body]. Also, since the bill is thinner at the tip, more light shines through it and can produce an erroneous pinkish tinge in photographs.
    
    Also, bills may change color slightly at different temperatures, because of different hormone levels, and other factors.]
    
    Third, there are 3 possibilities always to consider: Masked, Nazca, and the dreaded Hybrid.
    
    But, I did find one trait interesting, and it showed up in every individual that had molted from 1st to 2nd cycle. On Masked boobies, in 2nd-cycle the 2 central rectrices were black for at least 50% of their length distally.
    
    On Nazca boobies the 2 central rectrices were white for 75-100% proximally, any black if present being at most an inch or slightly more at the tip.
    
    All other rectrices on both species appeared similar.
    
    I did not study the rectrices on adults of either species.
    
    On the basis of the spread tail photos I see of this individual—and better photos are needed—I see extensive black on the central 2 rectrices, for me, pointing more towards Masked than Nazca.
    
    As I said, only some informal comments, but something I think worth looking at.
    
    Stan Walens
    
    San Diego
  14. -back to top-
  15. Re: [CALBIRDS] Fwd: [MBBIRDS] Booby still present at Pt Pinos at 9:10 am LINK
    DATE: Jul 20, 2017 @ 10:41am, 5 month(s) ago
    For those who might be interested, below are links to eBird checklists that have photos of the subadult Masked/Nazca Booby at Point Pinos. Unfortunately, because it is a slash taxa the checklists do not show up in any of the eBird alerts, so are not easily findable by the general public.
    
    Tom Benson
    San Bernardino, CA
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S38228455
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S38214515
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S38214488
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S38222232
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S38212156
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S38223748
    
    
  16. -back to top-
  17. Fwd: [MBBIRDS] Booby still present at Pt Pinos at 9:10 am LINK
    DATE: Jul 20, 2017 @ 10:21am, 5 month(s) ago
    For what it is worth, there is a subadult Masked/Nazca Booby
    sitting on the outermost rocks at Pt. Pinos for its 3d day. Found
    initially at mid-day on Tues by Mark Kudrav during a seawatch, he
    saw it come and and land with cormorants. That day it stayed until
    at least 5:30 p.m. Yesterday it was seen to fly in off the sea at
    about 9:30 a.m., and remained until 3 p.m., when it was watched
    flying off to sea, presumably to forage. Yesterday it had not
    returned by 4:30 p.m. but was seen to fly past the Point on a
    foraging route at about 4 p.m.  And today, as posted below, it is
    present again. It is generally believed that subadult Masked/Nazca Boobies
    cannot be identified. Locally we've been working to get together a
    series of photos sitting and in flight to compare with at-sea
    photos from the ranges of the two species. Identification is
    discussed in Howell et al.'s book "Rare Birds of North America"
    and in my 1998 paper in Field Notes, available on line at
    
    https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/journals/nab/v052n03/front.pdf
    
    [the original paper had color photos on every page; alas, in the
    one-line version, color shows only on every-other page; also the
    label of adults sitting together was switched left as right when
    the photo was mistakenly published backward]. Based on seeing the bird in life and on photos reviewed so far, I
    think the booby is in early 2d cycle (using the Howell system),
    having just completed the first "wave" in the accelerated stepwise
    molt. Again, more photos would help on this point. If so, the
    booby would be perhaps 14-18 months old, or about 1.5 years old.
    So far we believe the distal two-thirds of the bill is yellow but
    the basal third is ivory / bone / dull-chalk [description of color
    from 3 different observers]. Some have felt a pinkish cast might
    be present at the base of the bill in some lights; others do not
    see that. It seems reasonably clear, however, that the color of
    the base of the bill is not greenish-yellow or bluish. Again, more
    photos could help. The bird is perched on inaccessible rocks and
    so all views and photos are from a distance. A scope is required.
    Based on details in my paper vis-a-vis bill color at this age,
    and suggestions that bill shape might be useful, some are leaning
    towards Nazca. More work needed. In any event, even Masked/Nazca
    is a rare occurrence is California and this might be an
    opportunity to study one. Although the booby, when present, can usually be seen from the
    long parking lot at the tip of Pt. Pinos, it is often best viewed
    from the smaller parking lot just south of the Point, which locals
    call "the Raven lot."  From that spot it is usually on the
    left-hand-most (westernmost) rock with cormorants (and can
    sometimes be obscured by them). It has not yet been seen on the
    taller guano-covered rocks that have held Nazca, Brown,
    Red-footed, and Blue-footed Booby in the past.
    Good luck and hopefully more
    photos will help us understand this interesting topic better.
    Please continue to report occurrence or non-occurrence.  Don
    Roberson
    
    -------- Forwarded Message -------- Subject: [MBBIRDS] Booby still present at Pt Pinos at 9:10 am Date: Thu, 20 Jul 2017 09:11:55 -0700 From: Beth Hamel To: mbbirds@...
    
    Roosted with cormorants on furthest out rock. Has flown around once since we arrived at 8 am.
    
    Best Birding!
    
    Beth and Tom Hamel
    Morgan Hill
    
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  18. -back to top-
  19. Pelagic trip out of Ventura with Island Packers on July 16 LINK
    DATE: Jun 30, 2017, 6 month(s) ago
    Hi All
    
    This is a reminder that Island Packers is offering a 12-hour deepwater pelagic trip from the Ventura Harbor at 7 am on Sunday July 16. This trip will allow us to get to offshore waters beyond the reach of most day trips where we will
    have a chance to see a number of outstanding pelagic birds and marine
    mammals. Our intention is to go south from Ventura towards San Nicolas
    Island and the banks, knolls, canyons and other productive features in
    the area. This will give us a chance to look for sought after species
    like Red-billed Tropicbird, Least Storm-Petrel, Leach's Storm-Petrel,
    Townsend's Storm-Petrel, Guadalupe Murrelet and Craveri's Murrelet. Research trips that have traversed the area south of the Channel Islands
    this spring have recorded a few rare species including a Nazca Booby
    and Cook's Petrels. We
    will decide what our offshore destination will be after reviewing
    oceanographic conditions at the time of the trip, which will help
    determine where the birds and other marine life may be present or
    concentrated.
    
    Summer
    trips in July and August
    coincide with the earlier parts of the southbound fall migration of
    arctic nesting species, the northward dispersal of southern nesting
    species, and the nesting and fledging periods of breeding species on the
    Channel Islands. Past trips have found Manx Shearwater (rare),
    Black-footed Albatross, Laysan Albatross (rare), Buller's Shearwater,
    Leach's Storm-Petrel,
    Blue-footed Booby, Brown Booby, Long-tailed
    Jaeger, South Polar Skua, Scripps's Murrelet, Craveri's Murrelet (several were seen out of San Diego last week so they are around), Arctic Tern, and a variety of other shearwaters,
    storm-petrels, pelagic gulls and terns, phalaropes, and alcids.
    Patrolling the shoreline of Anacapa Island has yielded American
    Oystercatchers over the last few years. Summer is also an excellent
    time for Ashy and Black Storm-Petrels, and Cassin's Auklets. There is
    often a flock of 1000's of Black Storm-Petrels south of the islands
    that we will attempt to find. A few Rhinoceros Auklets and Common Murres should still be
    around, along with Pigeon Guillemots near the islands. Red-billed
    Tropicbird is always possible on summer trips, although not found every
    year.
    
    The trip will be on an ultra-fast catamaran that features a
    spacious and comfortable cabin, galley, and excellent viewing from
    both the upper and lower decks. A full contingent of outstanding seabird
    leaders will be present to make sure we see all that is out there. The
    Captain and crew know how to run birding trips and are enthusiastic
    and helpful.In addition, we work hard to creep up on birds and get
    them in the right light...photographers will not be disappointed!
    
    Trips can be booked over the phone by calling (805) 642-1393 or online at www.IslandPackers.comby clicking the Reserve Trip tab, select the Special Trips tab, and select your desired departure. The cost of the trip is $195 per adult.
    
    Hope to see you at sea!
    
    Dave Pereksta
    Ventura, CA
  20. -back to top-
  21. News from the California Bird Records Committee LINK
    DATE: May 2, 2017 @ 3:50pm, 7 month(s) ago
    Birders,
    
    The California Bird Records Committee held its annual meeting at the Psomas offices in Pasadena 27-28 January 2017. Belatedly, here are some of the highlights of that meeting.
    
    COMMITTEE MEMBERSHIP
    
    Jon Dunn, Rob Fowler, and Justyn Stahl were elected as voting members. Steve Rottenborn, Scott Terrill, and Tom Benson were re-elected as Chair, Vice Chair, and Secretary, respectively. The terms of Brian Daniels, John Garrett, and Jim Tietz expired.
    
    REVIEW LIST
    
    Little Gull was removed from the Review List on the basis of the total number of accepted records (118 at the time of the meeting) and relatively straightforward identification. Magnificent Frigatebird was removed based on the number of recently accepted records
    (75 since the species was added to the Review List in 2010), and Magnificent/Great/Lesser Frigatebird was also removed. No new species were added to the Review List , but one species group (Salvin’s/Chatham Albatross) was added .
    
    OTHER DISCUSSIONS/DECISIONS
    
    The Committee discussed the following issues that may be of general interest to birders:
    
    There was extensive discussion of offshore boundaries and the manner in which offshore records are logged by the CBRC, based on recent suggestions by several birders. The Committee did not make any major changes in approach; it will continue to report the locations
    of offshore records based on “closest point of land” (including islands) without assigning the record to a particular county. Legal county boundaries exist in nearshore waters and certain bays, but for offshore records, the CBRC will continue to report only
    the county in which the closest point of land lies.
    
    The Committee established an “expedited review” process by which records of easily identifiable species that are well-supported by photo, video, and/or audio documentation supporting the claimed identification are evaluated more quickly than in the standard
    review process. Integration of the CBRC records evaluation process with eBird was also discussed. Although the CBRC will continue to consider how the CBRC and eBird processes can assist each other, no specific decisions regarding changes in Committee procedures
    were reached.   Identification of subadult Masked and Nazca boobies, including the age at which characters allowing definitive identification may appear and how hybrids between the two species can be identified (or eliminated)
    in the case of subadults, was discussed. The CBRC will reach out to experts on these species to gather more information for use in evaluating records of subadults. The Committee also discussed records of Plegadis ibis that appear to be Glossy Ibis except for
    small amounts of pink, red, or purple that was not reported by the observers but that is visible in photos (sometimes limited to a few pixels at high magnification). The potential for such colors to result from some aspect of the photographic process, rather
    than representing actual pigment, was discussed. Determining when (and whether) hybrids can be eliminated in the case of certain species pairs that are known to interbreed, such as Masked and Nazca booby and White-faced and Glossy ibis, will continue to be
    challenging.
    
    Among the specific records that were discussed, two are worthy of some explanation here. The possible Red-backed x Turkestan Shrike at Manchester S.P., Mendocino County 5 Mar-22 Apr 2015 was previously evaluated as a Brown Shrike by the Committee and not accepted
    as such. At its recent meeting, the Committee reiterated a previous decision not to formally review it as a Red-backed x Turkestan Shrike. The Committee felt that the 2015 paper by Pyle et al. (North American Birds 69:4-35) did an excellent job evaluating
    the identity of the shrike and concluding that it was most likely a Red-backed x Turkestan hybrid, but that even that paper expressed some uncertainty in this conclusion. Committee members did not feel that the CBRC could bring a more definitive conclusion
    to this identification. The Committee discussed whether to add Gray Thrasher to the Supplemental List based on the 2 August 2015 record from Famosa Slough, San Diego County. The Supplemental List is for species with records that have not been accepted on the
    grounds of questionable natural occurrence, but for which a majority of members believe there is enough potential for natural occurrence for inclusion on the Supplemental List. In the case of the Famosa Slough bird, the condition of the bird’s feathering,
    feet, and bill suggested prior captivity strongly enough that the Committee did not feel that the record warranted adding the species to the Supplemental List.
    
    The CBRC discussed the possibility of forming a subcommittee to consider whether/how the CBRC might formally evaluate records of birds showing the characters of well-marked subspecies that meet the Committee’s general criteria for review species. The Committee
    will reach out to individuals (including non-Committee members) who might be interested in serving on the subcommittee and explore this idea further.
    
    The Introduced Birds Subcommittee (IBSC), consisting of Kimball Garrett, Jim Tietz, John Garrett, and Tom Benson, will continue to monitor whether any introduced species warrant addition to the State List. In the case of introduced species that have been added
    to the state list in other states (e.g., Florida), the IBSC will look into the species’ relative abundance and distribution in California vs. other states where the species have been added. The IBSC will also consider preparing a list of all introduced species
    that have been recorded in California, perhaps ranking them according to some as-yet-undetermined status designations.
    
    Please feel free to visit the CBRC’s webpage at
    http://www.californiabirds.org/ for updates and additional information. If you have any questions about the CBRC, please contact Steve Rottenborn ( chair@... )
    or Tom Benson ( secretary@... ).   Finally, I will continue to serve as the occasional CBRC “spokesperson” on Calbirds for the coming year.  I’m not currently on the CBRC, so just the messenger…   Kimball L. Garrett Ornithology Collections Manager Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County 900 Exposition Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90007 USA (213) 763-3368 kgarrett@... http://www.nhm.org/site/research-collections/ornithology  
  22. -back to top-
  23. Upcoming Trips with Monterey Seabirds LINK
    DATE: Feb 25, 2017, 10 month(s) ago
    Hello Fellow Birders-   Upcoming Trip! March 11th 2017 Join us for our next 8 hour trip out in Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary looking for Seabirds and other wildlife! We expect to see plenty of Black-footed Albatross, Red-necked Phalaropes, Sooty Shearwaters, Pink-footed Shearwaters, Cassin's Auklets, Rhinoceros Auklets, Sabine's Gulls & much more! We are also VERY likely to spend time observing marine mammals such as Humpback Whales, Gray Whales, Blue Whales, Fin Whales, dolphins, pinnipeds and sea otters! Some of our favorite species from 2016 were Laysan Albatross, Short-tailed Shearwater, Nazca Booby and Tufted Puffin!   Tickets are $125 per person for 8 hours. Check in is at 7am for a 7:30am departure. Please be prepared for all types of weather and bring your own lunch. Our primary vessel for the trips is the Pt. Sur Clipper which we send out with 30 passengers or less to allow for comfort and space for photographers. Call 831-375-4658 for more information and to sign up, or you can go online to montereyseabirds.com .   We have more 8 & 12 hour trips throughout the year – here is the list: Saturday 4/1/17 (8 hr)
    Saturday 6/10/17 (8 hr)
    Sunday 8/20/17 (8 hr)
    Tuesday 9/5/17 (8 hr)
    Sunday 9/10/17 (8 hr)
    Monday 9/11/17 (12 hr)
    Sunday 9/17/17 (8 hr)
    Monday 9/18/17 (12 hr)
    Thursday 9/21/17 (8 hr)
    Monday 9/25/17 (12 hr)
    Tuesday 9/26/17 (8 hr)
    Sunday 10/1/17 (8 hr)
    Monday 10/2/17 (12 hr)
    Sunday 10/15/17 (8 hr)
    Monday 10/16/17 (12 hr)
    
    Follow along with us online! Find us on Ebird:   http://ebird.org/ebird/profile/ODAzOTE2/US-CA-053 Like us on Facebook!   https://www.facebook.com/montereyseabirdtours Join our mailing list by emailing mbwwassistant@... .
    
    --
    Katlyn Taylor
    Marine Biologist
    Monterey Bay Whale Watch
    971-322-8425
  24. -back to top-
  25. 2017 Trips with Monterey Seabirds LINK
    DATE: Jan 6, 2017 @ 5:05pm, 11 month(s) ago
    Hello Fellow Birders-
    We are pleased to announce our 2017 calendar! We are also looking for trip leaders and spotters this year. If you are interested, please send an email to mbwwassistant@... .
    
    Saturday 3/11/17 (8 hr)
    Saturday 4/1/17 (8 hr)
    Saturday 6/10/17 (8 hr)
    Sunday 8/20/17 (8 hr)
    Tuesday 9/5/17 (8 hr)
    Sunday 9/10/17 (8 hr)
    Monday 9/11/17 (12 hr)
    Sunday 9/17/17 (8 hr)
    Monday 9/18/17 (12 hr)
    Thursday 9/21/17 (8 hr)
    Monday 9/25/17 (12 hr)
    Tuesday 9/26/17 (8 hr)
    Sunday 10/1/17 (8 hr)
    Monday 10/2/17 (12 hr)
    Sunday 10/15/17 (8 hr)
    Monday 10/16/17 (12 hr)
    
    Join us for 8 & 12 hour trips out in Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary looking for Seabirds and other wildlife! We expect to see plenty of Black-footed Albatross, Red-necked Phalaropes, Sooty Shearwaters, Pink-footed Shearwaters, Cassin's Auklets, Rhinoceros Auklets, Sabine's Gulls & much more! We are also VERY likely to spend time observing marine mammals such as Humpback Whales, Gray Whales, Blue Whales, Fin Whales, dolphins, pinnipeds and sea otters! Some of our favorite species from 2016 were Laysan Albatross, Short-tailed Shearwater, Nazca Booby and Tufted Puffin!
    
    Tickets are $125 per person for 8 hours and $160 per person for 12 hours. Check in is at 7am for a 7:30am departure. Please be prepared for all types of weather and bring your own lunch. Our primary vessel for the trips is the Pt. Sur Clipper which we send out with 30 passengers or less to allow for comfort and space for photographers.
    Call 831-375-4658 for more information and to sign up, or you can go online to montereyseabirds.com - trips should be available for selection starting Tuesday January 10th.
    
    Follow along with us online!
    Find us on Ebird: http://ebird.org/ebird/profile/ODAzOTE2/US-CA-053
    Like us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/Monterey-Seabirds-1420685978212542/
    
    Join our mailing list by emailing mbwwassistant@... .
    --
    Katlyn Taylor
    Marine Biologist
    Monterey Bay Whale Watch
    971-322-8425
  26. -back to top-
  27. Request for documentation for CBRC review species LINK
    DATE: Nov 17, 2016, 1 year(s) ago
    Greeting Calbirders,   As fall migration is winding down, I hope that you all got out and saw some good birds over the past few months. There were a number of reports on listservs and on eBird of California Bird Records Committee (CBRC)
    review species . If you saw any of these, I encourage you to submit your documentation (written descriptions, photos, and/or audio recordings) to the CBRC. In particular, I have included a list below
    for which the CBRC has received little or no documentation. If you have not submitted documentation to the CBRC previously and you don’t know what to include, please visit the
    CBRC website where you can find
    submission guidelines as well as a
    report form . One of the CBRC’s primary purposes is to permanently maintain documentation of rare birds in order to better understand the status and distribution of birds in California, as well
    as to preserve these records for future research. Your submission of documentation greatly facilitates the work of the CBRC in pursuing this goal.   Great () Frigatebird – Point Pinos MTY, 2 Nov: 0 reports Nazca Booby – Point Pinos MTY, 14 Nov: 0 reports Black Vulture – Bodega Bay SON, 22 Oct-8 Nov: 0 reports Bar-tailed Godwit – Shoreline Park ALA, 3-5 Sep: 1 report Little Stint – Tolowa Dunes DN, 1 Aug: 1 report Little Stint – Centerville Wetlands HUM, 31 Aug: 1 report Little Stint – San Jacinto Wildlife Area RIV, 9-15 Oct: 3 reports Red-necked Stint – Humboldt Bay HUM, 14 Aug: 3 reports Red-necked Stint – Eel River Estuary HUM, 1 Sep: 0 reports Red-necked Stint – San Jacinto Wildlife Area RIV, 5-9 Sep: 3 reports Thick-billed Murre – near Bodega Head SON, 9 Oct: 3 reports Yellow-bellied Flycatcher – Humboldt Bay HUM, 16-21 Sep: 2 reports Dusky-capped Flycatcher – Antonelli Pond SCZ, 4 Sep: 0 reports Dusky-capped Flycatcher – Point Pinos MTY, 14-16 Nov: 0 reports Sulphur-bellied Flycatcher – Carpinteria Creek SBA, 30 Sep: 0 reports Blue-headed Vireo – Fort Rosecrans Nat’l Cemetery SD, 18 Sep: 0 reports Winter Wren – Crystal Spring SBE/INY, 5-7 Nov: 1 report Dusky Warbler – Oyster Point SM, 24-26 Sep: 4 reports Rufous-backed Robin – Chiriaco Summit RIV, 13-14 Oct: 0 reports Rufous-backed Robin – Desert Center RIV, 12-16 Nov: 0 reports Mourning Warbler – Galileo Hill KER, 10-11 Sep, 3 reports Cape May Warbler – Point Reyes MRN, 11 Oct: 0 reports Cape May Warbler – Palo Alto SCL, 15-17 Oct: 1 report Rusty Blackbird – Smith River DN, 15 Nov: 0 reports Streak-backed Oriole – Desert Center RIV, 23-24 Oct: 3 reports Common Grackle – Smith River DN, 15 Nov: 0 reports   Thank you, Tom   Thomas A. Benson Secretary, California Bird Records Committee secretary@...  
  28. -back to top-
  29. Another Likely Nazca Booby at Point Pinos, MTY LINK
    DATE: Nov 14, 2016 @ 1:17pm, 1 year(s) ago
    This morning at Monterey Audubon's Point Pinos Seawatch, Skye Haas, Paul Fenwick and I, had one of the (or the) presumably continuing adult NAZCA BOOBIES foraging at the fogline north of the Point. In the mist it was difficult to determine the bill hue, but given the repeated documented sightings of adult Nazcas around the Monterey Bay this year (this is at least the fourth incident) today's bird seems likely to be one.
    
    Taken in conjunction with MTY's recent Great Frigatebird, one wonders what event(s) or conditions are driving these southerly birds so deep into the California Current in 2016
    
    We will post a comprehensive Seawatch update soon. The count thus far has been characterized by robust SUSC numbers (with daily BLSC sightings), the continuing REPH event, high numbers of RHAU and PAJA. This morning we also saw an unusual movement of Surfbird flocks, as well as a couple inshore ASSP. Yesterday was our first 1000+ day for PALO.
    
    Good birding,
    
    -Blake Matheson
    
    Monterey Peninsula
  30. -back to top-


-revision history-
v1.30 - 01/05/16 - Revamped cloud logic, optimized database queries, linked to eBird rarities.
v1.23 - 12/08/11 - Added direct link to CBRC records.
v1.22 - 12/03/11 - Corrected GMT offsets on dates. Added last 5 posts at top.
v1.21 - 11/24/11 - Added direct link to range map for NA birds.
v1.2  - 11/23/11 - Greatly improved graphing technology - separates month vs. year by posts. Added species auto-complete functionality.
v1.14 - 11/22/11 - Added cloud bubble for common thread topics.
v1.13 - 11/22/11 - Added integrated photos where available.
v1.12 - 11/22/11 - Added multiple input boxes for additional refinement, negative search criteria (eg. -keyword).
v1.11 - 11/22/11 - Added banding code, species look-up. Also direct link to recent eBird observations.
 v1.1 - 11/22/11 - Added 'date' functionality. Shows top 'month/year' combinations for a query. Restrict results to that 'month/year'.
 v1.0 - 11/21/11 - Initial version coded. Currently archiving 'lacobirds' and 'calbirds'.