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   Mottled Petrel (Pterodroma inexpectata) - MOPE (recent eBird sightings, view CBRC records, range map
)

  1. revised (upward) cruise-ship totals: 5 Short-tld Albatrosses, 187 Mottled Petrels, 8 Cook's, 45 Laysans LINK
    DATE: Dec 2, 2017 @ 8:29am, 9 day(s) ago
    The numbers I posted yesterday (01 Dec) for the "Star Princess"
    
    cruise-ship transect off OR (and earlier CA) were low, for the entire
    
    group; and careful, constantly-scoping birders added a lot more
    
    individuals for some species. So the "final" totals for the day for the
    
    more interesting species were:
    
    Short-tailed Albatross: 5 (all first-year and one probable
    
    second-year), including 3 together
    
    Laysan Albatross: 44 (all-time high from any birding boat Perhaps
    
    higher in past on one or two NOAA cruises)
    
    Mottled Petrel: 187 (crazy numbers once the first bird was seen off
    
    Newport)
    
    Cook's Petrel: 8 (as far north as off Tillamook)
    
    Buller's Shearwater: 3
    
    Views of a bunch of the albatrosses and many Mottleds were spectacular,
    
    and undoubtedly many full-frame photos will be posted with the
    
    appropriate eBird reports in a couple days or so.
    
    Alas, I am told that the return sailing southbound on the STAR PRINCESS
    
    two weeks from now from Vancouver to Los Angeles is FULL.
    
    --Paul Lehman, San Diego
  2. -back to top-
  3. an epic cruise-ship day: 5 Short-tld Albatrosses, 91 Mottled Petrels, 4 Cook's, 18 Laysans LINK
    DATE: Dec 1, 2017 @ 5:20pm, 10 day(s) ago
    A slow Nov 30th off California (MTY to SON) aboard a northbound Princess
    
    cruise-ship from Los Angeles to Vancouver was highlighted by a mere 2
    
    LAYSAN Albatrosses, 3 Buller's Shearwaters, lots of fulmars, and single
    
    Fork-tailed, Leach's, and Ashy Storm-petrels. But Dec 1st, spent
    
    entirely off the Oregon coast from northern Curry Co. to the WA border
    
    was phenomenal, with 5 SHORT-TAILED ALBATROSSES (off Curry and Coos and
    
    Lincoln Cos.)--all young birds and 3 together associated with a single
    
    fishing boat, where many photos taken; a total of 91 MOTTLED PETRELS
    
    (from off Newport northwards), with many birds at point-blank distance
    
    from the ship and a bazzilion photos taken (and some people had even
    
    higher counts), with the last couple birds before dark being seen just
    
    inside Washington waters; at least 4 COOK'S PETRELS, very rare in OR
    
    waters and occurring well north up the coast as far as off Tillamook
    
    Co.; a very high count of 18 LAYSAN ALBATROSSES (including a single
    
    flock of 7 and flock of 5); and 2 BULLER'S SHEARWATERS (getting late).
    
    If anyone is interested in trying for some of these birds, the same
    
    Princess ship ("Star Princess") is returning southbound from Vancouver
    
    to L.A. two weeks from now. Maybe some of them will have shifted south
    
    into CA waters by then.....
    
    --Paul Lehman
  4. -back to top-
  5. OCTOBER 9th PELAGIC TRIP MENDOCINO LINK
    DATE: Sep 15, 2016 @ 2:18pm, 1 year(s) ago
    Hi All,
    Don't miss out on this trip as Mendocino Pelagic trips never fail to see good birds! I will be co-leading with John Sterling, Steve Stumpwater, Sean Mcalister and Fritz Stuerer. We plan on spending a good amount of time within the 10-15 mile range which seems to be very productive just off shore of Fort Bragg. I have copied and pasted Steve's e-mail announcement if you plan on signing up you have the information. If you e-mail me I will forward your information to steve for the sign up. October is a good time to be birding in Mendocino as well so make a weekend out of it!
    There is also a Deep-water trip in November that will be targeting pterodromas if we get out....... hopefully.
    
    Todd Easterla Eldorado Hills, Ca.
    
    Todd Easterla and I have
    booked a Pelagic Seabird trip out of Noyo Harbor (Fort Bragg, CA Mendocino
    County) on Sunday Oct. 9th.
    This trip will be on the Trek II with Captain Richard and
    should be approximately 10 hours on the ocean .
    
    Info for the Trek II at http://www.anchorcharterboats.com/the-trek-ii
    
    Although this trip will max
    at 20 miles out, Trek II has agreed to a November trip (probably Nov. 20th)
    that will go 50 to 60 miles out (the Trek II is fast) on the hunt for Mottled
    and Stejneger's Petrel. It is my understanding that both CA records for
    Stejneger's Petrel that were reported on eBird were in November.
    Mottled PetrelNov/Dec is best (per eBird submissions).
    
    The first participants on
    this Oct. 9th trip will secure a seat on the November trip. Interested parties
    please return to stevestump@... The cost for this trip is
    $130 Trip leaders are Todd
    Easterla and John Sterling
    
    Thank you Mendobirds
    for allowing me to post this trip!
    
    
    
    Steve Stump Upper Lake, CA
  6. -back to top-
  7. cruise-ship Day 2 (OR and WA): 8 Mottled Petrels, 28 Buller's, 3 Laysans, 1 Flesh-foot, 1 Parakeet LINK
    DATE: Dec 3, 2015 @ 4:56pm, 2 year(s) ago
    Dec 2nd was the second full day offshore on the northbound Princess
    cruise from Los Angeles to Vancouver. (See yesterday's post for CA
    highlights.) The 30 birders aboard were treated to fine views (and many
    photos) of a total of 8 MOTTLED PETRELS (1 in OR, 7 in WA), plus a
    very-surprising-for-December total of 28 BULLER'S SHEARWATERS (21 in OR,
    7 in WA), plus 3 LAYSAN ALBATROSSES ( 2 in OR, 1 in WA), 1 FLESH-FOOTED
    SHEARWATER (OR), and 1 PARAKEET AUKLET (WA).
    
    I mention these birds outside California because this same cruise-ship
    (Ruby Princess) is returning from Vancouver to L.A. from Dec 15-18, with
    space. And it is very cheap. So if anyone would like to try for Mottled
    Petrel in California waters, this would be about your best chance
    available--though still hardly "likely," but it is as good as one can
    do. We will be off WA/OR on Dec 16, off CA on Dec 17, and arrive L.A.
    early on Dec 18. Princess is NOT planning on running these Nov/Dec
    cruises in 2016 and probably not in 2017--so it is "now or never."
    
    --Paul Lehman, San Diego
    
    
  8. -back to top-
  9. Correction of my Quote and New Seabirds LINK
    DATE: May 16, 2015 @ 5:45pm, 3 year(s) ago
    Paul and Calbirders:
    
    I just want to get the record straight as Paul did not quote me correctly in his post. I did not say I had no desire to look at petrels through a scope 4 stories up, I said that I didn't think I would get the same thrill from that. Pretty easy to check what I said, it's a couple of messages down.
    
    When I lived in CA, I spent fair bit of time seawatching, often from a bluff a few stories up. I enjoyed it immensely, and I'm sure the views from a cruise ship are far better than from a bluff. My point is that at least for me, birding is not just about seeing the bird, but also about the process, the adventure. I can still remember my first Monterey Bay trip with Debi in 1987. That trip literally changed my life, seeing albatrosses, shearwaters, storm-petrels, puffins, and auklets all close to the boat remains one of the great thrills of my life.
    I remember my first Murphy's Petrel as it appeared 10m from the boat near the Rodriquez Dome on the first multi-day Searcher trip. My first Cook's Petrel was in nearly the same place a couple of years later on that same boat. I recall seeing groups of 10 to 50 Cook's Petrels sitting on the water on a beautifully calm day from the bow of the Condor Express. We edged the boat up quite close before they flew.
    
    I'm not sure that a cruise ship view through a scope would give me that same sense of wonder. Having said that, not everyone has the luxury (or inner-ear) to do a large number of single day trips. If I were advising someone prone to motion sickness, or a lister who wanted the best chance to see Murphy's Hawaiian, or Cook's Petrels, or a county lister, I would tell them to go on one of these cruises, no doubt.
    
    I agree with Alvaro that sooner or later a really mega bird will be seen from one of these ships.
    
    I may even go on one myself sometime, but I am quite confident that these trips will not generate the sense of wonder and awe that I get on a pelagic adventure. Having said that, I still need Mottled Petrel for CA......
    
    As for the next seabird, both Christmas Island Shearwater and Tahiti Petrel have been recorded off Baja.
    Townsend's Shearwater is on the list, but it was a "Newell's" type rather than one of the Mexican birds, but given the rarity of that species now,if they are split, the nominate is probably not likely. Given that Ringed Storm-Petrel and Swallow-tailed Gull are both on the list, Debi's vote for Waved Albatross seems good. I also think that Swinhoe's Storm-petrel is a good (although challenging ID problem). The winter-breeding race of Leach's storm-petrel from Guadalupe Island (Ainley's Storm-Petrel) should also make it So Cal, so if that split goes through, we will have that to sort out. But if past history is a guide, the next new seabird will be some southern hemisphere thing we didn't expect.
    
    Todd McGrath
    skua@...
    The Woodlands, TX
    
    ---In CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com, <lehman.paul1@...> wrote :The latest SINGLE day on a cruise ship (this one on Princess heading
    north the first day of a San Francisco to se. Alaska and back 10-day
    cruise) recorded 120 Murphy's, 3 Hawaiian, and 1 Cook's Petrel, and 8
    Laysan Albatrosses. Before giving brief details, I would like too
    interject a comment as a follow-up to comments made in posts yesterday,
    in particular one post from someone whom has never taken such a cruise
    ship pelagic, that they'd rather not search for pterodromas "from four
    stories up with a scope." Obviously everyone has their personal
    preferences, but clearly the way to see spring pterodromas off CA is
    from cruise ships, from which one stays all day (typically two full
    days) in appropriate deep water, in comfort, and at a perfectly fine
    height above water level, and where one can easily use a scope if
    desired, rather than beating one's self up spending much of the day
    getting out to and back from deep water--and in which one only spends
    perhaps a few hours during a one-day trip--barfing or spray-drenched as
    you go on a pitching small boat. And while Cook's Petrels usually (but
    not always) keep some distance from these very large cruise ships so
    most are at moderate or farther distance (but you can easily use a
    scope) so better views are typically gotten from the smaller boats, some
    Murphy's and Hawaiians come very close to the ship, providing excellent
    views even with just binoculars (better than the views of those two
    species I've had from smaller boats)-- though like all pelagic trips,
    some trips do better on numbers and quality of views than do others.
    Such cruise pelagics also get you to well offshore waters and off
    counties where smaller, typical one-day trips simply can't get. But,
    these cruises are hardly "replacements" for single-day trips on small
    boats, some of which unfortunately can't even chum anymore, which was
    one of the advantages of the small-boat trips. Rather, they provide
    additional opportunities in spring, summer, and fall, especially in
    getting to shelf-edge waters in comfort.
    
    Anyway, back to May 13th:
    Dawn found us 104 km off Eureka, heading NW, for a few hours in Humboldt
    and Del Norte CA waters before entering Oregon waters for the remainder
    of the day (where we ended the day 320 km west of Newport). Here's a
    partial list for the day:
    
    LAYSAN ALBATROSS: 8 (good count; all OR)
    Black-footed Albatross: 27
    Northern Fulmar: 4 (low)
    MURPHY'S PETREL: 120 (record high one-day count for Pacific Coast;
    10 HUM, 15 DN, 95 OR; excellent photos)
    HAWAIIAN PETREL: 3 (1 DN, 2 OR; very good photos)
    COOK'S PETREL: 1 (DN; the larger numbers this year have been from
    Monterey Co. southwards)
    Fork-tailed Storm-Perel: 11 (low)
    Leach's Storm-Petrel: 900
    Red Phalarope: 1650
    LONG-TAILED JAEGER: 49 (high; included a single flock of 24 off OR)
    SCRIPP'S MURRELET: 2 (pair off OR; where well north, especially in May)
    
    --Paul Lehman, San Diego (currently in Juneau)
    
    
  10. -back to top-
  11. Re: Monterey Seabirds 2015 schedule LINK
    DATE: Dec 5, 2014 @ 9:56pm, 3 year(s) ago
    I meant to write July 26th.
    John SterlingVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVV26 Palm AveWoodland, CA 95695530 908-3836jsterling@...www.sterlingbirds.comMonterey Seabirdswww.montereyseabirds.com(831) 375-4658Special Galapagos Birding Tour9-19 July 2015
    
    On Dec 4, 2014, at 8:23 PM, John Sterling <jsterling@...> wrote:
    Howdy Birders,Monterey Seabirds gladly announces its 2015 schedule with some exciting dates. More may be added, but these are set for now. The next trip following the three-hour Monterey CBC trip on Dec. 28th is on March 21st. This is a good date for Mottled Petrel, so although unlikely, we hold out hope for finding one on that trip.
    
    All dates are on Saturday, except for July 22 which is on a Sunday.
    Dates:
    March 21
    July 22
    August 8, 22
    September 12, 19
    October 3, 10
    Additional dates are possible, so check website for
    updates.
    Duration:
    8 hours
    Cost: $130
    For reservations contact Monterey Seabirds (also Monterey Whalewatch office). (831)
    375-4658; www.montereyseabirds.com; birdtrips@...
    
    Hope to see you on the ocean in 2015.
    
    John
    
    John SterlingVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVV26 Palm AveWoodland, CA 95695530 908-3836jsterling@...www.sterlingbirds.comSpecial Galapagos Birding Tour9-19 July 2015
    
    
  12. -back to top-
  13. Monterey Seabirds 2015 schedule LINK
    DATE: Dec 5, 2014 @ 8:23pm, 3 year(s) ago
    Howdy Birders,Monterey Seabirds gladly announces its 2015 schedule with some exciting dates. More may be added, but these are set for now. The next trip following the three-hour Monterey CBC trip on Dec. 28th is on March 21st. This is a good date for Mottled Petrel, so although unlikely, we hold out hope for finding one on that trip.
    
    All dates are on Saturday, except for July 22 which is on a Sunday.
    Dates:
    March 21
    July 22
    August 8, 22
    September 12, 19
    October 3, 10
    Additional dates are possible, so check website for
    updates.
    Duration:
    8 hours
    Cost: $130
    For reservations contact Monterey Seabirds (also Monterey Whalewatch office). (831)
    375-4658; www.montereyseabirds.com; birdtrips@...
    
    Hope to see you on the ocean in 2015.
    
    John
    
    John SterlingVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVV26 Palm AveWoodland, CA 95695530 908-3836jsterling@...www.sterlingbirds.comSpecial Galapagos Birding Tour9-19 July 2015
    
    
  14. -back to top-
  15. Pelagic trip report - Oct 18, 2014 from Ventura LINK
    DATE: Oct 20, 2014 @ 8:36am, 3 year(s) ago
    Island Packers and Southern California Pelagic Birding had a 10-hour trip out of the
    Ventura Harbor on Oct 18. We ran through the eastern part of the Santa Barbara Channel to Anacapa Island, then south along the eastern edge of the Santa Cruz Basin to several knolls west of Santa Barbara Island, then to Sutil Rock at Santa Barbara Island, and eventually returning to Ventura crossing the Pilgrim Bank en route.
    
    The eastern channel was full of
    Black-vented Shearwaters and we saw nearly 1,000 birds in this area. Several flocks allowed very close approach on the water, which provided us to opportunity to find other species associating with them including a Sooty Shearwater (we only saw 2 all day!), Red-necked Phalaropes, Common Murre, and both Parasitic and Pomarine Jaegers. There were also several Humpback Whales in the same vicinity. We then headed to Anacapa Island where we encountered over 100 Cassin's Auklets in small groups and more shearwaters and jaegers. The island provided a few non-pelagic species, the most notable of which was a stunning pair of Bald Eagles perched on the island. The eastern end near the lighthouse had a Blue-footed Booby and Brown Booby perched among the cormorants and gulls. While this would have been considered a rare event years ago, we are now regularly seeing these species on the island over the last two
    years. After leaving the two boobies, we found another Brown Booby perched on the famous Arch Rock. Cruising nearshore along the south shore of the island, we found a pair of American-type Oystercatchers that look like they will pass the Jehl test for "countable" Americans.
    
    After leaving Anacapa Island, we turned our course south towards Santa
    Barbara Island. With so many SBCo birders on board, any other route may have resulted in a mutiny! Riding
    the contours of the eastern edge of the basin we found several groups of feeding birds associated with some impressive pods of both short-beaked and long-beaked common dolphins. There were surprising numbers of Black-vented Shearwaters in the area, which do not commonly venture that far offshore. This area also yielded Pink-footed Shearwaters, Red and Red-necked Phalaropes, all three species of jaegers (Long-tailed, Parasitic, and Pomarine), Cassin's Auklets, and a Common/Arctic Tern that got away from us.
    
    Perhaps the highlight of the trip was the booby show we saw at Sutil Rock. Our conservative estimate based on the highest number of individuals we saw concurrently was 23 Brown Boobies! We were able to see birds of all ages, including a few sharp looking adult females and males; the latter showing off the frosty head of the brewsteri subspecies.
    
    After tearing ourselves away from Sutil Rock, we headed back
    to Ventura with a planned crossing of the Pilgrim Bank area. As we hit the bank, the first screams of "murrelets!!" rang out for the day. We encountered five murrelets in the area that we initially identified as including both Scripps's (3) and Craveri's Murrelets (2). However, after extensive review of photos today, that number may be revised to five Craveri's Murrelets. We capped the day with close views of a pod of Risso's dolphins on the way back in and some even saw a green flash as the sun dropped into the Pacific.
    
    I want to thank the crew at Island Packers for another
    fabulous trip. Captain Jimmy did a masterful job of getting us close to the birds and handling all our requests to turn around, slow down, backup, "chase that bird," etc. Joel and Lori took care of everyone's needs on-board and also spotted birds throughout the day. It is great to have a crew that are all birders as well! I also want to thank the fine crew of leaders we had on board. Peter Gaede, Hugh Ranson, Bernardo Alps, Don DesJardin, and Wes Fritz tirelessly looked for birds and marine mammals all day and helped get everyone on the critters as we found them.Our last trip of the year is scheduled for November 15 on the Condor Express out of the Santa Barbara Harbor. Our plan is to head to the western Santa Barbara Channel and the waters surrounding San Miguel and Santa Rosa Islands where we will look for wintering alcids, shearwaters, fulmars,
    albatrosses, and seasonal
    specialties including Short-tailed Shearwaters and Black-legged Kittiwakes. Past trips to this area in November have found Buller's and Flesh-footed Shearwaters, and several rarities (Mottled Petrel and others) are possible at the deepwater edge southwest of San Miguel. Space is available, but please register as soon as possible (before the end of October) if you are planning to go.The cost for the trip is $175. We depart Santa Barbara
    promptly at 7:00 AM, so please arrive by 6:30 AM to facilitate check-in
    and loading. Call the Sealanding at 888-77WHALE or 805-882-0088, or go
    online at http://www.condorexpress.com/, to reserve your spot.Hope to see you on board!Dave PerekstaVentura
    
  16. -back to top-
  17. Repositioning cruise report from Paul Lehman LINK
    DATE: May 5, 2013 @ 12:18am, 5 year(s) ago
    I received a call earlier from Paul Lehman, who was just returning with a group
    of birders from the latest repositioning cruise off the West Coast. Highlights
    were:
    
    Thursday, 2 May
    4 Tufted Puffins (Santa Barbara County south of Santa Rosa Island)
    1 Horned Puffin (same as above)
    
    Friday, 3 May
    Mendocino north to southern (Curry County) Oregon (don't have exact locations)
    6 Hawaiian Petrels (at least one in each state)
    4Hawaiian/Galapagos Petrels
    1 Mottled Petrel (Oregon)
    5 Cook's Petrels total
    38 Murphy's Petrels total (California and Oregon)
    24 Parakeet Auklets in California
    
    Dave Compton
    Santa Barbara
    
    
  18. -back to top-
  19. Re: [CALBIRDS] Anyone out there looking for Mottled Petrels? LINK
    DATE: Dec 2, 2012 @ 4:33am, 5 year(s) ago
    FWIW, the lone Mottled Petrel seen from shore in Monterey Co. was at Pt. Pinos
    in early Dec. See
    http://creagrus.home.montereybay.com/MTYsitesPtPinos2.html
    (bird #3) for details. So this is actually a pretty good idea . . .
    
    Don Roberson
    Pacific Grove CA
  20. -back to top-
  21. Re: [CALBIRDS] Anyone out there looking for Mottled Petrels? LINK
    DATE: Dec 2, 2012 @ 3:31am, 5 year(s) ago
    FYI, using funds from an oil spill in California, we eradicated rats a few
    years ago from the Big South Cape Islands in New Zealand (see report at
    https://nrm.dfg.ca.gov/FileHandler.ashxDocumentID=41023&inline=true)
    
    The aim was to restore Sooty Shearwaters. However, Mottled Petrels also
    nest there in large numbers and I heard the other day they seemed to be
    coming back strong.
    
    On Sat, Dec 1, 2012 at 6:38 PM, Brian Sullivan wrote:
    
    > **
    >
    >
    > Birders
    >
    > I did a bit of seawatching between storms here at Pt. Pinos in Pacific
    > Grove this morning. In windless conditions there were excellent numbers of
    > birds offshore, especially Northern Fulmars. I'm wondering if anyone else
    > is seeing good numbers from shore
    >
    > I was hoping to find a Mottled Petrel today (I know, long shot), but hear
    > me out. This year there were unprecedented flights at St. Paul Island, one
    > day with several thousand birds. Check out this report:
    >
    > http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S11419953
    >
    > Several were also seen recently from Boiler Bay in Oregon during a good
    > seabird flight. These strong Pacific storms can displace tubenoses toward
    > shore, but unfortunately there seems to be relatively little wind with
    > these last three storms--at least here in Monterey. What I'm looking for
    > are really strong northwesterlies following one of these big systems, as
    > those are the conditions that produce big seabird flights at Pt. Pinos. If
    > we get those, I think there's a reasonable chance for Mottled Petrel from
    > shore if people put in the time looking. I don't see much wind in the
    > marine forecast for the following week, but I'll be keeping an eye on it!
    > Here's my full checklist from today:
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > Brian
    >
    > --
    > ===========
    > *Brian L. Sullivan
    >
    > eBird/AKN Project Leader *
    > www.ebird.org
    > www.avianknowledge.net
    >
    > *Photo Editor*
    > Birds of North America Online
    > http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/BNA
    > North American Birds
    > www.americanbirding.org
    > -------------------------------
    >
    > 
  22. -back to top-
  23. Anyone out there looking for Mottled Petrels? LINK
    DATE: Dec 2, 2012 @ 2:38am, 5 year(s) ago
    Birders
    
    I did a bit of seawatching between storms here at Pt. Pinos in Pacific
    Grove this morning. In windless conditions there were excellent numbers of
    birds offshore, especially Northern Fulmars. I'm wondering if anyone else
    is seeing good numbers from shore
    
    I was hoping to find a Mottled Petrel today (I know, long shot), but hear
    me out. This year there were unprecedented flights at St. Paul Island, one
    day with several thousand birds. Check out this report:
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S11419953
    
    Several were also seen recently from Boiler Bay in Oregon during a good
    seabird flight. These strong Pacific storms can displace tubenoses toward
    shore, but unfortunately there seems to be relatively little wind with
    these last three storms--at least here in Monterey. What I'm looking for
    are really strong northwesterlies following one of these big systems, as
    those are the conditions that produce big seabird flights at Pt. Pinos. If
    we get those, I think there's a reasonable chance for Mottled Petrel from
    shore if people put in the time looking. I don't see much wind in the
    marine forecast for the following week, but I'll be keeping an eye on it!
    Here's my full checklist from today:
    
    Thanks
    
    Brian
    
    --
    ===========
    *Brian L. Sullivan
    
    eBird/AKN Project Leader *
    www.ebird.org
    www.avianknowledge.net
    
    *Photo Editor*
    Birds of North America Online
    http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/BNA
    North American Birds
    www.americanbirding.org
    -------------------------------
    
    
  24. -back to top-
  25. Trip Reports: Oct 6 & 7, 2012 LINK
    DATE: Oct 10, 2012 @ 3:22am, 5 year(s) ago
    Howdy, Birders,
    
    Trip reports and photographs for Shearwater Journeys's October 6 pelagic trip
    departing from Monterey and October 7 departing from Half Moon Bay can be found
    at:
    http://shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com/2012/10/trip-report-october-6-monterey-ba
    y.html
    
    Abe Borker's images of the Monterey trip, Oct 6th, including images of the
    killer whale activity are at:
    http://shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com/2012/10/images-of-day-by-abe-borker-octob
    er-6.html
    
    Highlights were many! The marine weather was especially great with flat, calm,
    even glassy seas and warm temperatures. Hundreds of BLACK-VENTED SHEARWATERS
    have can be seen, nearshore in Monterey, while a few are outside of the harbor
    at Half Moon Bay. One highlight of the Monterey trip was KILLER WHALES eating a
    prey item, possibly a Dall's Porpoise that we had seen only minutes earlier.
    (More images to come!). Highlights on the Half Moon Bay trip included 3 MARBLED
    MURRELETS, LEATHERBACK SEA TURTLE, a RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH 31 miles offshore
    (clear day), fabulous flocks of BULLER'S and PINK-FOOTED SHEARWATERS, and two or
    three BAIRD'S BEAKED WHALES at the 1000 fathom line. We traveled 41 miles
    offshore to 60 degree water!
    
    Our last trips of the fall season are as follows:
    OCT 14 Monterey Bay
    OCT 26 Bodega Bay
    OCT 28 Half Moon Bay
    NOV 20 Half Moon Bay
    
    If weather/sea conditions permit, we hope to make if offshore on the Half Moon
    Bay trips, in particular, with hopes of finding Cook's or Mottled Petrels. This
    is also a good time of year to find other rare petrels, such as Parkinson's and
    White-chinnned. Late October is a good time for Short-tailed Albatross. Roll the
    dice!
    
    For a glance back at our September 30th Farallones Islands trip, see Bruce
    Hallett's images at:
    http://shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com/2012/10/images-of-day-by-bruce-hallett.ht
    ml
    
    Real birds eat squid,
    Debi Shearwater
    
    DEBRA SHEARWATER
    Shearwater Journeys, Inc.
    PO Box 190
    Hollister, CA 95024
    831.637.8527
    debi@...
    www.shearwaterjourneys.com
    www.shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com
    
    Birding Down Under: SubAntarctic Islands, November 10 - 28, 2014 with Debi
    
    
  26. -back to top-
  27. Monterey Seabirds this Sat. LINK
    DATE: Oct 26, 2011 @ 2:42pm, 6 year(s) ago
    Seabirders and Calbirders will be interested in this report from Jeff N. Davis:
    
    > We did an aerial survey back and forth over the Davidson Seamount today,
    10/25. Bird and mammal diversity and abundance were relatively low. However,
    we did have some goodies. Highlights were a MOTTLED PETREL (JND) and a
    BOOBY--probably a Red-footed (Dave Lewis). We also had one LAYSAN ALBATROSS,
    two FORK-TAILED STORM-PETRELS, four LEACH'S STORM-PETRELS, and 2 ASHY
    STORM-PETRELS on transect. I'll be in the field for the next few days but will
    send more details when I can.
    
    I just wanted to let everyone know that the Monterey Seabirds trip
    scheduled for Saturday is a go and we have plenty of spaces available.
    The Davidson Seamount is of course out of our reach in an all day trip
    but who knows what could be lurking offshore.
    
    Todd Easterla, Fritz Steurer,Tim Amaral, Dan Singer, Don Roberson,
    Martijn Verdoes, Rod Norden and Blake Matheson will be on board as
    spotters. Regulars Glen Tepke and Ken Petersen, who were part of the
    team that recently found the White-chinned Petrel up north will also be
    on board as will seabird photographer Jeff Poklen.
    
    This will be Monterey Seabirds last trip of the season. Come out on join
    us in the hunt for the next mega. Cost is $120 per person.
    
    Call 831 375 4658 to reserve your spot or do it online at
    http://www.montereyseabirds.com
    
    Local rarities being reported on the hotline:
    
    Pacific Grove:
    A SCARLET TANGER was seen in the cemetery today. The bird was in the
    myoporum in the East end near the boundry with the golf course. The
    BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLER continues in the myoporum near the
    restrooms at Crespi Pond. [ Blake Matheson]
    
    Roger Wolfe for Monterey Seabirds
    Soquel Canyon
  28. -back to top-
  29. Fwd: [pacificseabirds] Cook's petrels off California LINK
    DATE: Sep 15, 2010 @ 9:56pm, 7 year(s) ago
    Forwarding from Pacificseabirds listserv-- the benefits of rat and cat
    removal in NZ. Other species (Xantus's Murrelet, Cassin's Auklet, Sooty
    Shearwater, and Mottled Petrel come to mind) are benefitting from
    similar projects both in CA and NZ.
    
    Steve Hampton
    ________________
    Resource Economist
    Office of Spill Prevention and Response
    California Dept of Fish and Game
    PO Box 944209
    Sacramento, CA 94244-2090
    -----------------------------------
    (916) 323-4724 phone
    (916) 324-8829 fax
    
    >>> 9/14/2010 6:42 PM >>>
    ***************************************************************************
    This is a message from the Pacific Seabird Group listservice. Use
    REPLY only if your message is of interest to the ENTIRE listservice.
    Otherwise, compose NEW message.
    ***************************************************************************
    
    It has been another astounding year and another grand season for
    Cook's
    Petrels off California. A year ago there was also a remarkable
    occurrence
    of this species in California:
    www.refugenet.org/birding/sepSBC09.html#TOC02
    
    Cook's Petrel is not particularly well known off the coast of North
    America, and those few birds that appear (May to November) are almost
    always more than 100 miles offshore. This year, in late July
    astounding
    reports were received from Peter Pyle and Abe Borker who were
    surveying
    seabirds for NOAA at the Davidson Seamount, about 60 miles from
    Monterey
    harbor. They observed a total count of over 3,000 Cook's Petrels on one
    day
    and almost 1,400 the next.
    
    According to Debi Shearwater, who helped us collect these numbers,
    there
    were also additional sightings of Cook's Petrels: four on 31 July off
    Half
    Moon Bay and one on 6 August off Monterey. These birds then seemed to
    disappear offshore almost as quickly as they appeared.
    
    Cook’s Petrel breeds (October to April) on islands off New Zealand,
    and the
    birds apparently spend some of their non-breeding season off South
    America.
    The recent increase in reports off our own Pacific coast has been
    attributed to the successful removal by researchers of rats and cats
    from
    Little Barrier Island, New Zealand. Little Barrier Island is one of
    New
    Zealand's premier native wildlife sanctuaries and is the reported
    source of
    "our" Cook's Petrels. Indications are that we might continue to see
    increased numbers of them in future years as the population continues
    to
    rebound.
    
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Verena A. Gill
    Wildlife Biologist
    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
    Marine Mammals Management
    1011 East Tudor Road, MS 341
    Anchorage, Alaska 99503
    
    work phone: 907-786-3584
    work cell: 907-947-6443
    fax: 907-786-3816
    e-mail: verena_gill@...
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    No trees were harmed in the sending of this message; however, a large
    number of electrons were terribly inconvenienced.
    ***************************************************************************
    This is a message from the Pacific Seabird Group listservice. To
    subscribe, visit https://www.fws.gov/lists/listinfo/pacificseabirds. To
    unsubscribe, send an email to PacificSeabirds-request@....
    Enter "unsubscribe" in the subject field. Questions Contact Verena
    Gill at verena_gill@...
    
    ***************************************************************************
  30. -back to top-


-revision history-
v1.30 - 01/05/16 - Revamped cloud logic, optimized database queries, linked to eBird rarities.
v1.23 - 12/08/11 - Added direct link to CBRC records.
v1.22 - 12/03/11 - Corrected GMT offsets on dates. Added last 5 posts at top.
v1.21 - 11/24/11 - Added direct link to range map for NA birds.
v1.2  - 11/23/11 - Greatly improved graphing technology - separates month vs. year by posts. Added species auto-complete functionality.
v1.14 - 11/22/11 - Added cloud bubble for common thread topics.
v1.13 - 11/22/11 - Added integrated photos where available.
v1.12 - 11/22/11 - Added multiple input boxes for additional refinement, negative search criteria (eg. -keyword).
v1.11 - 11/22/11 - Added banding code, species look-up. Also direct link to recent eBird observations.
 v1.1 - 11/22/11 - Added 'date' functionality. Shows top 'month/year' combinations for a query. Restrict results to that 'month/year'.
 v1.0 - 11/21/11 - Initial version coded. Currently archiving 'lacobirds' and 'calbirds'.