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   Masked Booby
Masked Booby
Sula dactylatra


   Masked Booby (Sula dactylatra) - MABO (recent eBird sightings, view CBRC records, range map
)

  1. AUG 4 & AUG 6 PELAGIC TRIP REPORTS LINK
    DATE: Aug 7, 2017 @ 2:16pm, 10 day(s) ago
    Howdy, Birders,
    
    Shearwater Journeys’ trips departing from Monterey Bay, August 4th and Sausalito to the Farallon Islands, August 6th, encountered extraordinary numbers and variety of seabirds and marine mammals. And, yes, “it’s all about food”— my favorite saying. Monterey Bay is teaming with bait fish and some krill. The area surrounding the Farallon Islands, out to the edge of the Continental Shelf was floor to ceiling in krill. The marine life associated with the prey items was divided accordingly! Both trips enjoyed flat, calm seas with visibility up to 10 miles.
    
    Highlights of our August 4 Monterey Bay pelagic trip included: BLACK-FOOTED ALBATROSS (8, excellent views), SOOTY (30,000+) and, PINK-FOOTED SHEARWATERS (34), ASHY STORM-PETREL (2, distant views), RED-NECKED (121) and RED (19) PHALAROPES, LONG-TAILED JAEGER (1, distant view), SABINE’S GULL (including 2 early juveniles, sitting on the water, excellent views), COMMON MURRE (1,025, many dads with chicks), and RHINOCEROS AUKLETS (62, good views). All birds were in Monterey County.
    
    Marine mammals included: BLUE (2), FIN (1), HUMPBACK (12) WHALES; RISSO’S (30) and PACIFIC WHITE-SIDED (100) DOLPHINS, DALL’S PORPOISE ( 8, bow-riding on the head of a blue whale). Other highlights included: MAKO (1, excellent views) and BLUE (4, great views) SHARKS. We retrieved 6 mylar balloons, but could not pick up the floating refrigerator (future potential booby habitat!)
    
    Highlights of our August 6 Farallon Islands pelagic trip included: MASKED (thought to be a sub-adult, hundreds of images), BLUE-FOOTED (1 on Sugar Loaf), and BROWN (1 sitting next to the Blue-footed) BOOBIES , BLACK-FOOTED ALBATROSS (2); NORTHERN FULMAR (1), SOOTY (10) and PINK-FOOTED (24) SHEARWATERS; RED-NECKED PHALAROPE (2700), and TUFTED PUFFIN (25), CASSIN’S (7000) and RHINOCEROS (10) AUKLETS, COMMON MURRE (18,000). Most birds were in San Francisco County, including the Masked Booby. We looked for the Parakeet Auklet, but did not find it. The Masked Booby flew across our bow shortly after leaving that location. Our excellent captain chased the booby and we had a chance to see it plunge-diving. Hundreds of images were made. A Common Murre was very vocal about this booby’s presence!
    
    Marine mammals included: GRAY (2), BLUE (4) and HUMPBACK (44) WHALES, HARBOR PORPOISE. We stopped the boat and were surrounded by tail-slapping, head-slapping and breaching humpback whales for 360 degrees. The fish finder showed krill from top to bottom along the shelf break. The albatrosses, shearwaters and fulmar flew in while we were sitting around taking photographs. The rather tattered fulmar swam right up to the gunwales. It was a magical marine scene that few will ever encounter. The weather was so good that we headed up to the north islands of the Farallon Island group— something I’ve only done once before.
    
    Spaces are available on the following trips: (leaders may be added to many of these trips)
    
    MONTEREY BAY:
    Aug 25 with Alex Rinkert, Jim Holmes, Debi Shearwater
    Sep 1 with Nick Levendosky, Mary Gustafson, Debi Shearwater
    Sep 7 with Nick Levendosky, Alex Rinkert, Jim Holmes, Mary Gustafson, Debi Shearwater
    Sep 8 with Mary Gustafson, Jim Holmes, Debi Shearwater
    Sep 10 with Mary Gustafson, Debi Shearwater
    Sep 14 with Debi Shearwater, TBA
    Sep 22 with Christian Schwarz, Hannah Nevins, Debi Shearwater
    Sep 23 with Nick Levendosky, Alex Rinkert, Jim Holmes, Steve Tucker, Debi Shearwater
    Sep 24 with Nick Levendosky, Jim Holmes, Debi Shearwater
    Sep 30 with Nick Levendosky, Alex Rinkert, Scott & Linda Terrill
    Oct 8 with Nick Levendosky, Alex Rinkert, Scott & Linda Terrill
    
    HALF MOON BAY:
    Sep 2 with Mary Gustafson, Debi Shearwater
    Sep 3 with Peter Pyle, Steve Tucker, Mary Gustafson, Debi Shearwater
    Sep 15 with Christian Schwarz, Dave Pereksta, Debi Shearwater
    Sep 16 with Steve Hampton, Debi Shearwater
    Oct 7 with Nick Levendosky, Alex Rinkert, Steve Hampton
    
    Many thanks to the wonderful folks, birders and birders-to-be, who joined us on these two fine pelagic trips. The leaders on August 4 included: Nick Levendosky, Abe Borker, Scott Terrill, Will Brooks, John Garrett, Debi Shearwater. The leaders on August 6 included: Gerry McChesney, Alex Rinkert, Christian Schwarz, John Garrett, Will Brooks, and Debi Shearwater.
    
    It IS all about food!
    Shearwaters Forever,
    Debi Shearwater
    
    DEBRA SHEARWATER
    Shearwater Journeys, Inc.
    PO Box 190
    Hollister, CA 95024
    831.637.8527
    debi@...
    www.shearwaterjourneys.com
    www.shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com
    
    Celebrating 42 Years of Seabirding with Shearwater Journeys
  2. -back to top-
  3. Re: [CALBIRDS] Fwd: [MBBIRDS] Booby still present at Pt Pinos at 9:10 am LINK
    DATE: Jul 20, 2017 @ 3:35pm, 28 day(s) ago
    Alvaro,
    
    Thanks for the comments. My sample size was, as I had quoted [n = 33] and could easily be biased if not randomly selected among island populations or anything else, and is just one small sample.
    
    Here is what Jehl & Pitman (1998) Wilson Bull. 110: 155-170 have to say about tail differences between adults OB [orange-billed = Nazca] and YB [yellow-billed = Masked] in their published study which is the basis for today's split of the two species:
    
    > In addition, the central rectrices in OB birds tend to be pale at the base, as if dusted with flour, and the extent increasing with age, so that some older sub-adults appear white-rumped; in YB populations the rectrices average darker, and whitish bases, if present, are usually concealed by the upper tail coverts. In definitive plumage, OB and YB forms are similar, except that the dark areas tend to be a rich chocolate brown with a reddish tinge in OB birds, compared to dark brown to blackish in YB birds, and the central rectrices average paler and may be almost entirely white, a condition that is rare in all YB populations.
    
    Full paper at https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/journals/wilson/v110n02/p0155-p0170.pdf
    
    I was just looking at slides I took on my one-day cruise on a NOAA ship through the Galapagos in 1989. Photos of two adults off Espanola appear black-tailed but another photo'd two days later to the southwest clearly has a long all-white central rectrix. Plate 8 in Nelson's The Sulidae (1978) Oxford Univ Press shows a pair of granti on Tower Island with a chick -- one adults has an all black tail and the other has a white pair of central rectrices. So the variation may be widespread and not confined to particular populations. More research needed.
    
    You may be right that the overall global percentage is not 60%-40% in favor adults with white centrals, but Jehl & Pitman describe the difference in terms tendencies and averages, increasing with age, but the language is consistent with some Nazcas being dark-tailed and, apparently, some rare Masked having white central rectrices. Presuming that they are correct, the presence of a white central rectrix would not entirely rule out Masked Booby. My point was that not too much emphasis should be placed in this variable character. So again it would mostly come down to bill color.
    
    As to bill color, as you know, it is not simply "yellow" in Masked and "orange" in adult Nazca. Jehl & Pitman describe Galapagos populations of Nazca as having bills that are "rosy pink in females, more orange in males." My paper described the variation as "bright orange to coral-red" in Nazca, whilst in Masked it was "greenish-yellow to bright yellow, sometimes with a small orangey tip." I wish people would not describe the difference as a simple "orange" versus "yellow" in adults. I also describe bill color in subadults in the paper, as do Howell et al. in their book.
    
    In addition, I would not rule out the potential usefulness of bill shape. Jehl & Pitman note that
    
    > Discriminant function analysis showed that OB birds are generally smaller, having shallower bills, shorter tarsi, and longer wings (Table 4, Fig. 2). The smaller size of OB birds is further indicated by body mass, which averages 12-14% lighter than S. d. personata (Anderson 1993). They are also more sexually dimorphic in bill, wing, and tarsus than YB boobies
    
    They go into further depth on bill shape differences in the paper. To my eye, a perceptible 'dip' in the culmen of Nazca about two-thirds out to the tip, and narrowing at that point, provides a different bill aspect than the more straight-culmened heft of Masked. It is a bit subtle and there will surely be overlap, so it is more of a suggestive point, similar to the tail topic.
    
    Look forward to hearing about your Galapagos trip.
    
    Thanks, Don
  4. -back to top-
  5. Re: [CALBIRDS] Fwd: [MBBIRDS] Booby still present at Pt Pinos at 9:10 am LINK
    DATE: Jul 20, 2017 @ 3:10pm, 28 day(s) ago
    Not arguing; just want to clarify a few germane issues Don raised:
    
    All the specimens I examined, both Nazca and Masked, were from several colonies in Mexico. These are colonies that are hard to access and because the 2nd-cycle bird I was analyzing appeared in San Diego waters after a period of sustained monsoon winds coming from the south paralleling the Mexican coastline, and not from the west or southwest, I felt it more likely to be a Mexican bird. That individual, whose molt progression is very similar to that of today’s Monterey bird, showed black-tipped white central rectrices.
    
    Specimens I looked at had been identified as Nazca either by genetic testing or because they’d been collected in the colony with parents of known species identity.
    
    When I look at photos or specimens from the Galapagos, they seem to have far more extensive white in the tails than the Mexican birds I looked at. But I was looking at only late 1st-cycle or 2nd-cycle birds, and it is possible that with each succeeding molt that the central rectrices become more extensively white in Nazca.
    
    Also, I found that the central rectrices were molting in early during the molt sequence. [So I would say that a bird as advanced in body molt as the Monterey bird is already showing 2nd-cycle central rectrices.]
    
    I also solicited from birders going to the Galapagos, series of photos of individual birds in which they would take many photos of a given bird from slightly different angles, so I might have some sense of how slight changes of light coming into the camera or reflecting off the bill in different ways might affect the apparent color of the bill. And it does.
    
    As I said, mine was a small, casual study with an inadequate N, but I was very surprised to see the difference in central rectrices between [Mexican] Nazca and Masked booby even early on in 2nd cycle.
    
    As for hybrids in Mexican colonies, I leave that for Bob Pitman to address.
    
    And like I said, my study was suggestive, not definitive. As is said in the final sentence of every scientific paper: "More study is needed.” : ))
    
    Stan Walens
    
    San Diego
  6. -back to top-
  7. Nazca/Masked Booby from Oregon released today in San Pedro LINK
    DATE: Oct 9, 2015 @ 12:13pm, 2 year(s) ago
    Birders,
    
    The sub-adult Nazca/Masked Booby brought into rehab in Newport, Oregon on 11 September and transferred to the International Bird Rescue center in San Pedro around 1 October has completed rehabilitation and was released this morning around
    11:00 a.m. from Whites Point in San Pedro, L. A. Co.
    
    The bird was fitted with a USGS silver band on its left leg; unfortunately IBR did not have authorization to color band or otherwise uniquely mark this individual. If you see a bird in this plumage, check carefully for bands. Photos of
    the bird can be found at the IBR web site:
    http://blog.bird-rescue.org/index.php/2015/10/we-love-boobies/ (labeled as “Masked Booby).
    
    The apparent dull pinkish coloration on much of the basal and dorsal portions of the bill suggests that this bird is a Nazca Booby (and would represent the first record of this species from Oregon). However, Nazca and Masked are closely
    similar in immature plumages and final determination, if there is to be one, will rest on DNA work from a preserved blood sample, perhaps augmented by information on measurements, plumage pattern and bill color.
    
    A Red-footed Booby brought into IBR on 13 September from Redondo Beach remains in rehab, but will probably be healthy enough to release at some point – I’ll post news of that release if an when it happens. This is the bird standing next
    to the Nazca/Masked Booby in the photo on the IBR web site.
    
    Kimball
    
    Kimball L. Garrett
    Ornithology Collections Manager
    Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County
    900 Exposition Blvd.
    Los Angeles, CA 90007 USA
    (213) 763-3368
    kgarrett@...
    http://www.nhm.org/site/research-collections/ornithology
    
  8. -back to top-
  9. Fwd: [SanDiegoRegionBirding] Hornblower trips; some comments on recent booby sightings; Nazca i.d. LINK
    DATE: Aug 25, 2014 @ 6:02pm, 3 year(s) ago
    On August 17, a masked/Nazca-type booby was photographed 6 miles south of the U.S. border, in Mexican waters. It was a third-year/subadult bird, with a bill that was orange at the base but yellow for the distal half. Photographs are linked to in the bottom part of this message.There has been much offlist discussion of this bird, but we are looking for sulid experts who might have developed/discovered/studied any diagnostic characteristics for Nazca vs. masked booby in. See Sue Smith’s clarification to my post.
    
    The question: Can masked boobies be told from Nazca boobies at ages less than full adult And what features can be used to separate either from masked/Nazca hybrids in subadult stages
    
    Sue and my email addresses are embedded in the email headings. Thanks in advance for your help.
    
    Stan Walens
    San DiegoBegin forwarded message:
    From: Susan Smith <seiurus ataoldotcom>
    Subject: Re: [SanDiegoRegionBirding] Hornblower trips; some comments on recent booby sightings; Nazca i.d.
    Date: August 24, 2014 at 5:45:03 PM PDT
    To: stan.walens atgmaildotcom, sandiegoregionbirding@yahoogroups.com
    
    To Stan and SDRBirders,
    To perhaps clarify a bit more about the Nazca or Nazca-Masked Booby thing, I'll try to paraphrase some recent comments I got from by Bob Pitman (NOAA,Southwest Fisheries Science Center, La Jolla), who wrote the original paper with Jehl on separating out these two species. What Bob said was that he could only rule out a "pure" Masked Booby based on the photographs, but he could not rule out a Nazca- Masked Booby hybrid based on his experience. He hadn't worked on the large Nazca colonies much (only those colonies where both species overlap, e.g Clipperton) to have had enough experience with the 3rd year plumage of Nazca Boobies to tell definitively whether last Sunday's bird was a pure Nazca rather than a hybrid. So its still possible it could be a third year Nazca. He also added that sub-adults tend to be rare on the breeding colonies, where most people study these birds, so maybe we will never know unless this same bird is seen and photographed again next year (at presumed full adulthood). Nonetheless, he suggested that someone might want to contact people working with the Nazcas on the Galapagos. They may have more experience with this particular plumage, and might have some useful photos. Or maybe they could comment on Christopher's photos. I looked up some Nazca Booby research and there is a Dr. David Anderson of Wake Forest University, N.C. (behavioral studies on Nazcas at Galapagos)who might have some comments on this. Some of you out there who are more familiar with the sulid literature and may know of researchers at the Galapagos who might also be of help.
    Happy Sulid-ing...Sue
    
    Susan SmithSeiurus Biological Consulting
    Del Mar, CA
    
    
  10. -back to top-
  11. Masked Booby-San Mateo County LINK
    DATE: Aug 12, 2014 @ 7:12am, 3 year(s) ago
    Ron just called he is in Moss Beach doing a seawatch at 7am he saw an adult MASKED BOOBY flying north. Details to follow later.
    
    The messenger from home,
    Leonie Batkin for Ron Thorn
    
    
  12. -back to top-
  13. Re: [CALBIRDS] Fwd: [LACoBirds] Masked booby spotted off coast of Palos Verdes LINK
    DATE: Jun 28, 2014, 3 year(s) ago
    I’ve certainly seen Nazca boobies with yellow eyes in the field [obviously, not in the continental U.S.], and there are numerous photos of yellow-eyed Nazca boobies on the internet.I don’t know enough about the morphology of Nazca booby to know if eye color is an age-related, sex-related, breeding-condition-related or population-variable characteristic.
    
    Another potential field mark, if I understand it correctly, is the shallow concavity of the culmen.
    
    Stan Walens
    San Diego
    
    On Jun 28, 2014, at 10:10 AM, Wanda <wandadameron2@...> wrote:
    The bill sure looks pink (vs. yellow) and possibly shorter, tho the eye is difficult to tell: more yellow than the needed orangeWanda DameronSan Fernando Valley
    
    
  14. -back to top-
  15. Re: [CALBIRDS] Fwd: [LACoBirds] Masked booby spotted off coast of Palos Verdes LINK
    DATE: Jun 28, 2014, 3 year(s) ago
    The bill sure looks pink (vs. yellow)
    and possibly shorter, tho the eye is difficult to tell: more
    yellow than the needed orange
    
    Wanda Dameron
    San Fernando Valley
    
    On 6/28/2014 9:14 AM, Stan Walens stan.walens@... [CALBIRDS]
    wrote:
    Wendy Miller posted a note to LA County Birds listserv
    with a link to photos by Tim Hammond.
    I believe the photos show an adult Nazca booby, and
    that this would be a first documented record for the
    continental U.S.
    Opinions
    
    Photos are here:
    http://whales.smugmug.com/Harbor-Breeze-06272014-3/i-ZN79CS2/A
    
    Having troubles with my email server; sorry if posts
    have appeared several times.
    
    Stan Walens
    San Diego
    
    << Previous post in topic
    Next post in topic
  16. -back to top-
  17. Fwd: [LACoBirds] Masked booby spotted off coast of Palos Verdes LINK
    DATE: Jun 28, 2014, 3 year(s) ago
    Wendy Miller posted a note to LA County Birds listserv with a link to photos by Tim Hammond.I believe the photos show an adult Nazca booby, and that this would be a first documented record for the continental U.S.
    Opinions
    
    Photos are here:
    http://whales.smugmug.com/Harbor-Breeze-06272014-3/i-ZN79CS2/A
    
    Having troubles with my email server; sorry if posts have appeared several times.
    
    Stan Walens
    San Diego
    
    Next post in topic
  18. -back to top-
  19. Updated Masked Booby Info LINK
    DATE: Nov 14, 2013 @ 2:53pm, 4 year(s) ago
    
    
    
    
    
    There are two 2 -2 1/2 hr trips daily: noon & 3pm. They have
    most often been seen on the way back of the 3
    pm trip, with the premise the Boobies are probably out
    feeding during the day & coming back to one of the buoys at days
    end to rest overnight. Makes a problem for driving home in traffic
    so you may want to stop for dinner first.
    
    If you want to confirm the birds were seen the previous day, call 562-432-4900. In any event, do let them
    know you are there to see the Boobies and they will take extra
    efforts to find them. (Hopefully the Captain will follow thru and
    start putting positive & negative reports on our LACoBirds@yahoogroups.com
    website, plus let us know about the Short-tailed Shearwater that
    shows up in Jan or Feb.)
    
    Tickets may be purchased there or ahead at www.2seewhales.com.
    
    Regular tickets there are $45 with senior tix at $40. Bit less
    if you buy online, w/ the mid-week cost at $35 plus $2 fee totaling
    $37. If two going is purchasing get 2 tix
    for $49 from Groupon.com. Best bet
    is ask for the Captain's Facebook Special is still good which has
    been $25 per person.
    
    Directions: From the 405 Fwy, go south on the 710
    LongBeach/Pasadena Fwy south 10 miles. Take the well-marked
    Downtown/Aquarium exit to the left onto W. Shoreline Drive , then to
    Aquarium for 1.9 mi. Turn right onto S. Pine Ave a block which
    takes you to the easiest parking which is in the Aquarium parking
    structure for $8. Exit left from the Aquarium parking structure
    elevators toward Harbor Breeze Cruises in Rainbow Harbor just
    behind the roundabout.
    
    Other thoughts: Days aren't always as wonderful, so be sure to
    have a wind-proof & warm jacket, hat w/a cord, sunglasses.
    Maybe clear soda & soda crax if you tend to be seasick.
    Food/drinks available on board. Some of us are planning to go on
    the Fri 3 pm trip if bird seen today.
    
    Cheers & Good Luck,
    Wanda Dameron
    West San Fernando Valley
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
  20. -back to top-
  21. Masked Booby Direction update LINK
    DATE: Oct 19, 2013 @ 11:03am, 4 year(s) ago
    
    
    
    Hooray! Masked Boobies seen on return of 3 pm cruise. Very few
    dolphins.
    Other highlights: 100's of Black-vented Shearwaters, 2 Sooty
    Shearwaters, a couple of Cassin's Auklets (Curtis Marantz only I
    think as tho called, flew off quickly), Shark's fin, Black
    Oystercatcher, Pomarine Jaegar..
    
    Directions: Follow the signs to the Aquarium
    to the end then right on Pine Ave. a block into the parking
    garage.
    
    If going over the weekend, recommend calling for reservations 562-432-4900 for the Captains Facebook
    Special for $25 as boat may be fuller, otherwise available at ticket
    counter. Again Friday, had around 18-20 birders making up half the
    customers.
    
    Wanda Dameron
    West San Fernando Valley
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
  22. -back to top-
  23. Masked Booby Report LINK
    DATE: Oct 17, 2013 @ 11:00am, 4 year(s) ago
    
    
    
    The group that was on the noon trip yesterday did NOT see the Masked
    Boobies!
    I understand it was on the 3 pm trip. We did have 2 No. Fulmars,
    some Black-vented Shearwaters, two pods of hundreds of Common
    Dolphins, 4 sp. Terns, 3 or 4 sp Gulls and misc. others. Not a
    lot, but one of the most beautiful days on the ocean--calm, warm,
    & short with at least 18 birders & around 40 on board, so
    easy to move around w/space for 149.
    
    There are two 2 -2 1/2 hr trips daily: noon & 3pm. Capt Carl
    suggested that the 3 pm trip is your better
    bet, with the premise the Boobies are probably out feeding
    during the day & coming back to one of the buoys at days end to
    rest overnight. Makes a problem for driving home in traffic so you
    may want to stop for dinner first.
    
    If you want to confirm the birds were seen the previous day, call 562-432-4900. In any event, do let them
    know you are there to see the Boobies and they will take extra
    efforts to find them. (Hopefully the Captain will follow thru and
    start putting positive & negative reports on our
    LACoBirds@yahoogroups.com website, plus let us know about the
    Short-tailed Shearwater that shows up in Jan or Feb.)
    
    Tickets may be purchased there or ahead at www.2seewhales.com.
    Regular tickets there are $45 with senior tix at $40. Bit less
    if you buy online, w/ the mid-week cost at $35 plus $2 fee totaling
    $37. Your best bet if two going is
    purchasing 2 tix for $49 from Groupon.com
    
    Directions: From the 405 Fwy, go south on the 710
    LongBeach/Pasadena Fwy south 10 miles. Take the well-marked
    Downtown/Aquarium exit to the left onto W. Shoreline Drive for 1.9
    mi. Turn left onto S. Pine Ave .3 mi. which takes you to the
    easiest parking which is in the Aquarium parking structure for $8.
    Exit left from the parking structure elevators toward Harbor Breeze
    Cruises in Rainbow Harbor adjacent to the Aquarium.
    
    Other thoughts: Days aren't always as wonderful, so be sure to
    have a wind-proof & warm jacket, hat w/a cord, sunglasses.
    Maybe clear soda & soda crax if you tend to be seasick.
    Food/drinks available on board. Some of us are planning to go on
    the Fri 3 pm trip if bird seen today.
    
    Cheers & Good Luck,
    Wanda Dameron
    West San Fernando Valley
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
  24. -back to top-
  25. Masked Booby photos, Long Beach, LA LINK
    DATE: Oct 16, 2013 @ 5:56pm, 4 year(s) ago
    Birders,
    
    Here is a link to my photos of the two Masked Boobies present on the buoy off of Long Beach Harbor, LA on Sunday October 13:
    
    http://www.leaftosser.com/Birding/MaskedBoobyPics.html
    
    You may notice that the subadult bird shows a hint of orange to its bill. I haven't the experience with either Masked or Nazca Boobies to comment with more insight, but it is intriguing.
    
    Jon Feenstra
    Altadena
    
    
  26. -back to top-
  27. Fwd: [LACoBirds] Masked and Brown Boobies LINK
    DATE: Sep 2, 2013 @ 2:55pm, 4 year(s) ago
    > From: "D@vid Bell"
    > Date: September 2, 2013 at 2:45:02 PM PDT
    > To: LACoBirding
    > Subject: [LACoBirds] Masked and Brown Boobies
    >
    > On today's San Pedro / Harbor Breeze cruise at noon an adult Masked Booby and an immature Brown Booby were seen. The brown might have been in orange county waters. We will check coordinates when we get on land.
    >
    > Masked first spotted by Darren Dowell. The brown first spotted by john Garrett.
    >
    > Unfortunately the crew were not at all helpful so we were not able to stop and get better views. We got identifiable but distant photos of both birds.
    >
    > David Bell
    > Pasadena ca.
    > BirdsEyeBirding.com
    >
    >
    
    
  28. -back to top-
  29. Fw: [MBB] Masked Booby report LINK
    DATE: Nov 17, 2012 @ 6:14pm, 5 year(s) ago
    Forwarding from the Monterey listserv:
    
    ----- Forwarded message from stephengerow@... -----
    
    Date: Sat, 17 Nov 2012 13:07:50 -0500 (EST)
    From: stephengerow@...
    Subject: [MBB] Masked Booby report
    To: mbb@...
    Cc:
    X-Mailer: AOL Webmail 37185-STANDARD
    Message-Id:
    
    I just received a call from John Garrett, that he and Alex Rinkert just saw a
    MASKED BOOBY fly past the San Lorenzo mouth, heading toward the west side of
    Santa Cruz.
    Steve Gerow
    
    _______________________________________________
    mbb mailing list
    mbb@...
    http://lists.pbsci.ucsc.edu/mailman/listinfo/mbb
    
    ----- End forwarded message -----
  30. -back to top-


-revision history-
v1.30 - 01/05/16 - Revamped cloud logic, optimized database queries, linked to eBird rarities.
v1.23 - 12/08/11 - Added direct link to CBRC records.
v1.22 - 12/03/11 - Corrected GMT offsets on dates. Added last 5 posts at top.
v1.21 - 11/24/11 - Added direct link to range map for NA birds.
v1.2  - 11/23/11 - Greatly improved graphing technology - separates month vs. year by posts. Added species auto-complete functionality.
v1.14 - 11/22/11 - Added cloud bubble for common thread topics.
v1.13 - 11/22/11 - Added integrated photos where available.
v1.12 - 11/22/11 - Added multiple input boxes for additional refinement, negative search criteria (eg. -keyword).
v1.11 - 11/22/11 - Added banding code, species look-up. Also direct link to recent eBird observations.
 v1.1 - 11/22/11 - Added 'date' functionality. Shows top 'month/year' combinations for a query. Restrict results to that 'month/year'.
 v1.0 - 11/21/11 - Initial version coded. Currently archiving 'lacobirds' and 'calbirds'.