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   Masked Booby
Masked Booby
Sula dactylatra


   Masked Booby (Sula dactylatra) - MABO (recent eBird sightings, view CBRC records, range map
)

  1. Upcoming pelagic trip out of Ventura on July 15 LINK
    DATE: Jul 3, 2018 @ 10:55am, 15 day(s) ago
     Hi All
    
    This is a reminder that Island Packers is offering a 12-hour
    deepwater pelagic trip from the Ventura Harbor at 7 am on Sunday July 15. This trip will allow us to get to offshore
    waters beyond the reach of most day trips where we will have a chance to see a
    number of outstanding pelagic birds and marine mammals. Our intention is to go southwest from Ventura
    towards San Nicolas Island and the banks, knolls, canyons and other productive
    features in the area. This will give us
    a chance to look for sought after species like Cooks Petrel, Red-billed
    Tropicbird, Least Storm-Petrel, Leach's Storm-Petrel, Townsend's Storm-Petrel,
    Guadalupe Murrelet and Craveri's Murrelet.
    Our trip to this area last year was outstanding and yielded Cooks
    Petrels, Black-footed Albatross, 45 Craveris Murrelets (!!), Brown Booby, and
    a variety of other pelagic species. Recent pelagic trips out of San Diego have
    found Craveris Murrelets, Nazca Booby, Masked Booby, and Townsends
    Storm-Petrel so there are some great birds in the Southern California Bight at
    the moment. We will decide what our offshore destination will be after
    reviewing oceanographic conditions at the time of the trip, which will help
    determine where the birds and other marine life may be present or concentrated.
    
    Summer trips in July and August coincide with the earlier
    parts of the southbound fall migration of arctic nesting species, the northward
    dispersal of southern nesting species, and the nesting and fledging periods of
    breeding species on the Channel Islands.
    Past trips have found Cooks Petrel (rare), Manx Shearwater (rare),
    Black-footed Albatross, Laysan Albatross (rare), Buller's Shearwater, Leach's
    Storm-Petrel, Blue-footed Booby, Brown Booby, Long-tailed Jaeger, South Polar
    Skua, Scripps's Murrelet, Craveri's Murrelet, Arctic Tern, and a variety of
    other shearwaters, storm-petrels, pelagic gulls and terns, phalaropes, and
    alcids. Patrolling the shoreline of
    Anacapa Island has yielded American Oystercatchers over the last few
    years. Summer is also an excellent time
    for Ashy and Black Storm-Petrels, and Cassin's Auklets. There is often a flock of 1000's of Black
    Storm-Petrels south of the islands that we will attempt to find. A few Rhinoceros Auklets and Common Murres
    should still be around, along with Pigeon Guillemots near the islands. Red-billed Tropicbird is always possible on
    summer trips, although not found every year.
    
    The trip will be on an ultra-fast catamaran that features a
    spacious and comfortable cabin, galley, and excellent viewing from both the
    upper and lower decks. A full contingent of outstanding seabird leaders will be
    present to make sure we see all that is out there. The Captain and crew know how to run birding
    trips and are enthusiastic and helpful.
    In addition, we work hard to creep up on birds and get them in the right
    light...photographers will not be disappointed!
    
    Trips can be booked over the phone by calling (805) 642-1393
    or online at www.IslandPackers.com by clicking the Reserve Trip tab, select the
    Special Trips tab, and select your desired departure. The cost of the trip is
    $195 per adult.
    
    Hope to see you at sea!
    
    Dave Pereksta
    Ventura, CA
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  3. CBRC review and request for documentation LINK
    DATE: Jul 2, 2018 @ 9:38am, 16 day(s) ago
    California birders, The California Bird Records Committee (CBRC) will begin reviewing the following records in late July. If you have any documentation to submit for these records, please do so as soon as possible. Feel free to forward this request to local
    listservs as appropriate. Thank you. Tom Thomas A. Benson Secretary, California Bird Records Committee 2018-039 Masked Booby, 1 May 18, Port of Los Angeles, LA (single observer, documentation complete) 2018-040 Masked Booby, 1 May 18, San Diego Harbor, SD (single observer, documentation complete) 2018-043 Masked Booby, 13 May 18, off Dana Point Headlands, ORA (single observer, documentation complete) 2018-052 Masked Booby, 31 May 18, off Dana Point Headlands, ORA (single observer, documentation complete) 2018-058 Masked Booby, 9 Jun 18, Pt. La Jolla, SD (documentation from 2 observers,
    addl documentation requested) 2018-059 Masked Booby, 10 Jun 18, Offshore San Diego County, SD (no documentation received, documentation requested) 2018-063 Masked Booby, 11 Jun 18, Catalina Island, LA (single observer, documentation complete) 2018-064 Masked Booby, 7 Jun 18,off Manhattan Beach, LA (single observer, documentation complete) 2018-065 Masked Booby, 15 Jun 18, off Long Beach, LA (single observer, documentation complete) 2018-036 Nazca Booby, 1-5 May 18, Chula Vista Wildlife Reserve, SD (single observer and specimen, documentation complete) 2018-050 Nazca Booby, 25 May 18, San Nicolas Island, VEN (single observer, documentation complete) 2018-060 Nazca Booby, 10 Jun 18, Offshore San Diego County, SD (no documentation received, documentation requested) 2018-041 Masked/Nazca Booby, 12 May 18, Pt.
    Dume , LA (single observer, documentation complete) 2018-051 Masked/Nazca Booby, 28 May 18, Offshore San Diego County, SD (single observer, documentation complete) 2018-038 Red-footed Booby, 6 May 18, Pt. Cabrillo, SD (single observer, documentation complete) What kind of documentation should one submit to the CBRC Following are some guidelines for submitting media and written descriptions that will be useful for helping the CBRC evaluate records and archive documentation. Documentation may
    be submitted directly to the secretary via email ( secretary@... ) , or by using the online submission form ( http://www.californiabirds.org/report_sighting.html ). Media: This includes photos, audio recordings, and video. Photographs are usually the most useful documentation for evaluating records. If you have reasonably good (=identifiable) photos, please submit them. If possible, please crop the
    photos before submission so that the bird fills most of the frame. Also, please send originals whenever possible, and not screenshots or back-of-camera photos. How many photos should you submit That really depends on the record. If it is a long-staying rarity
    that is easily identifiable and seen by dozens of people, then a few photos (1-3 per person) are sufficient. If it is a mega-rarity that is difficult to identify and only seen by a one or few people, then send as many photos as possible that show the bird
    at different angles, postures, lighting, etc. Sometimes it is also useful to submit audio and/or video recordings of the bird, as some birds are more easily identified by their vocalizations. If relatively short, most audio recordings are small enough to be
    submitted via email; please submit those along with a brief note indicating the date and location of the recording. Large audio files and video files can be submitted by using a file sharing service; please contact the secretary if you need to submit a file
    that is too large for email. Written descriptions: Some written details should always be provided even the best photos should be accompanied by the name of the observer, the date, and the location, at a minimum. Sometimes a photo cant be obtained or vocalizations
    cant be recorded. In some cases, behaviors might be noted in the field that arent preserved well by photos. In these cases, it is helpful to submit a written description of the bird. Ideally, this description should be written as soon after observing the
    bird as possible; it is often helpful to make written notes in the field, or even dictate notes into the voice recorder on your smartphone while observing the bird, from which you can later generate a written description. The most important aspect of a written
    description is that you report only what you observed, and not a general description of the bird from a field guide. At a minimum, your description should include the date and location of the observation, and a description of the bird (size and structure,
    plumage, vocalizations, behavior). A brief discussion of how the bird was identified, and how similar species were eliminated is also helpful. Other useful information you might report includes optics used, distance from bird, lighting or weather conditions,
    length of time viewed, and other observers present. 
  4. -back to top-
  5. Origin & age of banded Nazca Booby in San Diego County waters June 10, 2018 LINK
    DATE: Jun 15, 2018 @ 4:21pm, 33 day(s) ago
    On the last San Diego Pelagics
    trip this past Sunday June 10, 2018 we had the good fortune to
    find a subadult NAZCA BOOBY sitting on the water about 8:20am. Per GPS
    readings the exact location 5.5NM west of Imperial Beach and 1.1NM from Mexican
    waters to our south. The booby was spotted just as we motored up very
    close to it, maybe somehow it was hidden behind a swell, and we immediately
    stopped the boat and got very close looks at the bird. The bird
    was so close in fact that when it took off flying, luckily towards us and along the
    starboard side in front of assembled photographers, from the many photos taken
    a metal band could be clearly seen on the right leg. You have to marvel
    at modern camera sensors because images so detailed a
    partial band number could be read. The information on the band appeared
    to show a number or alphanumeric either "734.." or "73A.."
    visible. You can see the photos on our eBird checklist here https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46508705 I checked in with Kimball Garrett
    about the rehabbed Nazca/Masked Booby that had been released at San Pedro, Los
    Angeles County on Oct 9, 2015 but should have read his original email to the
    LACOBIRDS listserv first since this bird banded with USGS metal band on left
    leg. The San Diego
    bird, a subadult evidenced by some dark speckling on the white upperparts, also inconsistent
    considering age. Kimball confirmed the band did not match that of the San
    Pedro released bird with USGS band (with number 1038-26057). A second photo of the San Diego
    Nazca Booby then surfaced showing the band even more clearly and with an upper
    line possibly showing word "ANDER...". I had a hunch about
    where the band may have come from and reached out to Professor Dave Anderson at
    Wake Forest University who has been studying Nazca Booby and other seabirds in
    the Galapagos for the past 35 years. Sure enough, Dave confirmed the band
    originated from his lab and he could trace the partial number (734xx) of this
    Nazca Booby to an immature banded on Isla Espanola, Galapagos Islands, in the
    first half of 2017. He estimates the bird's age at 1 3/4 years old at time
    of sighting here in San Diego. He told
    me they have banded about 25,000 youngsters (Nazca Booby) and this is the
    71st report of one of their banded birds
    but the most northerly by 7 degrees of
    latitude. Dave noted that most band returns are of 1-2 year old
    birds from the Pacific coast of Central America. The age estimate, 21 months, seems low
    perhaps . You can see P7 or P8 growing,
    at least on the right wing, and this would seem to peg the bird, in 2nd-prebasic primary molt, in a 2526
    month age range using a Masked Booby molt pattern shown in Howell, 2010, Molt
    in North American Birds. I looked in Howell
    et al. 2014, Rare Birds of North America, and it states, under Nazca Booby, pp.
    117-11 9, 2nd- prebasic primary molt starting about 14 months
    after fledging, i.e. about 18 months of age. Considering
    the six or seven visible grown primaries, at about a month apiece, this would get us to
    2425 months. Maybe the discrepancy can be accounted for with individual variation or the original estimate is a bit lightweight.
    I will have to look around for Nazca Booby molt publications to understand the variation and check on this again with Dave Anderson . I will be submitting these complete
    details to the CBRC along with photographs showing the band number and plumage
    details of the booby. A credit due photographers Matthew Binns and Todd McGrath capturing images of the band. We have three more pelagics out of
    San Diego planned for 2018. Details can
    be found at the website http://www.sandiegopelagics.com
    and space is still available but August is filling up fast. In addition to Nazca Booby last Sunday we
    also found the much sought-after TOWNSENDS STORM-PETREL photos here https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46508696
    our next trip in August a good opportunity for this species.
    
    --
    Gary Nunn
    Pacific Beach
    
    you can find me on twitter, @garybnunn
  6. -back to top-
  7. Re: [CALBIRDS] Masked Boobies - white in tail LINK
    DATE: Jan 25, 2018 @ 2:20pm, 6 month(s) ago
    FWIW, Nazca Boobies were quite common attending our cruise ship off Mexico
    
    and Middle America last month. Most were adults. Here are some Nazca Booby
    
    photos including two photos of an immature off Nicaragua.
    
    https://fog.ccsf.edu/~jmorlan/LA2Chile-Dec2017/NazcaBoobyIMG_9258.htm
    
    Scroll down for the immature bird showing fairly extensive white in its
    
    tail. Both photos are of the same individual which I judged to be late in
    
    its first cycle. In my experience bill color seemed to change depending on
    
    light and angle.
    
    On Thu, 25 Jan 2018 16:42:37 +0000, "Steve Rottenborn
    
    srottenborn@... [CALBIRDS]"
    
    < CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com > wrote:
    
    >Hi Alvaro,
    
    >
    
    >You asked whether there were well-documented Masked Boobies with extensive white on the tail. "Extensive" is a matter of interpretation, but here's a photo of a Masked Booby with noticeable white on the central rectrices:
    
    >
    
    > http://www.birdspix.com/north-america/boobies-and-gannets-sulidae/masked-booby#jp-carousel-3739
    
    >
    
    >Also, Bob Pitman sent the CBRC a photo of a subadult Masked Booby with a similar amount of white at the base of the central rectrices. This amount of white in the tail seems to be the exception in Masked Booby, and certainly many Nazca Boobies have more extensive and conspicuous white in the tail. However, the CBRC has been wrestling with some records of subadult Masked/Nazca Boobies with about as much white in the central rectrices as on the bird in the link above, and with adult bill color just barely beginning to show, so we've been interested in whether that amount of white points to Nazca and eliminates Masked - apparently it does not.
    
    >
    
    >Your comments about juvenile Nazca Boobies already showing extensive white in the tail are interesting, and we were wondering whether juvenile Masked Boobies ever show extensive white in the tail or whether juvenile Masked Boobies are always dark-tailed. "Always" and "ever" are tricky words - there is still much we need to learn about variability in Masked and Nazca Boobies, so it may not be possible to know the extremes, but I'd be interested in any photos of juvenile Masked Boobies (i.e., Masked/Nazca types well away from Nazca breeding range) showing white in the central recs.
    
    >
    
    >Steve Rottenborn
    
    >Morgan Hill, CA
    
    >
    
    >
    
    >
    
    >
    
    --
    
    Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA
  8. -back to top-
  9. Masked Boobies - white in tail LINK
    DATE: Jan 25, 2018 @ 8:42am, 6 month(s) ago
    Hi Alvaro,   You asked whether there were well-documented Masked Boobies with extensive white on the tail.  “Extensive” is a matter of interpretation, but here’s a photo of a Masked Booby with noticeable white on the central rectrices:   http://www.birdspix.com/north-america/boobies-and-gannets-sulidae/masked-booby#jp-carousel-3739   Also, Bob Pitman sent the CBRC a photo of a subadult Masked Booby with a similar amount of white at the base of the central rectrices.  This amount of white in the tail seems to be the exception in Masked Booby, and certainly many Nazca
    Boobies have more extensive and conspicuous white in the tail.  However, the CBRC has been wrestling with some records of subadult Masked/Nazca Boobies with about as much white in the central rectrices as on the bird in the link above, and with adult bill
    color just barely beginning to show, so we’ve been interested in whether that amount of white points to Nazca and eliminates Masked – apparently it does not.    Your comments about juvenile Nazca Boobies already showing extensive white in the tail are interesting, and we were wondering whether juvenile Masked Boobies ever show extensive white in the tail or whether juvenile Masked Boobies are always
    dark-tailed.  “Always” and “ever” are tricky words – there is still much we need to learn about variability in Masked and Nazca Boobies, so it may not be possible to know the extremes, but I’d be interested in any photos of juvenile Masked Boobies (i.e., Masked/Nazca
    types well away from Nazca breeding range) showing white in the central recs.   Steve Rottenborn Morgan Hill, CA          
  10. -back to top-
  11. AUG 4 & AUG 6 PELAGIC TRIP REPORTS LINK
    DATE: Aug 7, 2017 @ 2:16pm, 12 month(s) ago
    Howdy, Birders,
    
    Shearwater Journeys’ trips departing from Monterey Bay, August 4th and Sausalito to the Farallon Islands, August 6th, encountered extraordinary numbers and variety of seabirds and marine mammals. And, yes, “it’s all about food”— my favorite saying. Monterey Bay is teaming with bait fish and some krill. The area surrounding the Farallon Islands, out to the edge of the Continental Shelf was floor to ceiling in krill. The marine life associated with the prey items was divided accordingly! Both trips enjoyed flat, calm seas with visibility up to 10 miles.
    
    Highlights of our August 4 Monterey Bay pelagic trip included: BLACK-FOOTED ALBATROSS (8, excellent views), SOOTY (30,000+) and, PINK-FOOTED SHEARWATERS (34), ASHY STORM-PETREL (2, distant views), RED-NECKED (121) and RED (19) PHALAROPES, LONG-TAILED JAEGER (1, distant view), SABINE’S GULL (including 2 early juveniles, sitting on the water, excellent views), COMMON MURRE (1,025, many dads with chicks), and RHINOCEROS AUKLETS (62, good views). All birds were in Monterey County.
    
    Marine mammals included: BLUE (2), FIN (1), HUMPBACK (12) WHALES; RISSO’S (30) and PACIFIC WHITE-SIDED (100) DOLPHINS, DALL’S PORPOISE ( 8, bow-riding on the head of a blue whale). Other highlights included: MAKO (1, excellent views) and BLUE (4, great views) SHARKS. We retrieved 6 mylar balloons, but could not pick up the floating refrigerator (future potential booby habitat!)
    
    Highlights of our August 6 Farallon Islands pelagic trip included: MASKED (thought to be a sub-adult, hundreds of images), BLUE-FOOTED (1 on Sugar Loaf), and BROWN (1 sitting next to the Blue-footed) BOOBIES , BLACK-FOOTED ALBATROSS (2); NORTHERN FULMAR (1), SOOTY (10) and PINK-FOOTED (24) SHEARWATERS; RED-NECKED PHALAROPE (2700), and TUFTED PUFFIN (25), CASSIN’S (7000) and RHINOCEROS (10) AUKLETS, COMMON MURRE (18,000). Most birds were in San Francisco County, including the Masked Booby. We looked for the Parakeet Auklet, but did not find it. The Masked Booby flew across our bow shortly after leaving that location. Our excellent captain chased the booby and we had a chance to see it plunge-diving. Hundreds of images were made. A Common Murre was very vocal about this booby’s presence!
    
    Marine mammals included: GRAY (2), BLUE (4) and HUMPBACK (44) WHALES, HARBOR PORPOISE. We stopped the boat and were surrounded by tail-slapping, head-slapping and breaching humpback whales for 360 degrees. The fish finder showed krill from top to bottom along the shelf break. The albatrosses, shearwaters and fulmar flew in while we were sitting around taking photographs. The rather tattered fulmar swam right up to the gunwales. It was a magical marine scene that few will ever encounter. The weather was so good that we headed up to the north islands of the Farallon Island group— something I’ve only done once before.
    
    Spaces are available on the following trips: (leaders may be added to many of these trips)
    
    MONTEREY BAY:
    Aug 25 with Alex Rinkert, Jim Holmes, Debi Shearwater
    Sep 1 with Nick Levendosky, Mary Gustafson, Debi Shearwater
    Sep 7 with Nick Levendosky, Alex Rinkert, Jim Holmes, Mary Gustafson, Debi Shearwater
    Sep 8 with Mary Gustafson, Jim Holmes, Debi Shearwater
    Sep 10 with Mary Gustafson, Debi Shearwater
    Sep 14 with Debi Shearwater, TBA
    Sep 22 with Christian Schwarz, Hannah Nevins, Debi Shearwater
    Sep 23 with Nick Levendosky, Alex Rinkert, Jim Holmes, Steve Tucker, Debi Shearwater
    Sep 24 with Nick Levendosky, Jim Holmes, Debi Shearwater
    Sep 30 with Nick Levendosky, Alex Rinkert, Scott & Linda Terrill
    Oct 8 with Nick Levendosky, Alex Rinkert, Scott & Linda Terrill
    
    HALF MOON BAY:
    Sep 2 with Mary Gustafson, Debi Shearwater
    Sep 3 with Peter Pyle, Steve Tucker, Mary Gustafson, Debi Shearwater
    Sep 15 with Christian Schwarz, Dave Pereksta, Debi Shearwater
    Sep 16 with Steve Hampton, Debi Shearwater
    Oct 7 with Nick Levendosky, Alex Rinkert, Steve Hampton
    
    Many thanks to the wonderful folks, birders and birders-to-be, who joined us on these two fine pelagic trips. The leaders on August 4 included: Nick Levendosky, Abe Borker, Scott Terrill, Will Brooks, John Garrett, Debi Shearwater. The leaders on August 6 included: Gerry McChesney, Alex Rinkert, Christian Schwarz, John Garrett, Will Brooks, and Debi Shearwater.
    
    It IS all about food!
    Shearwaters Forever,
    Debi Shearwater
    
    DEBRA SHEARWATER
    Shearwater Journeys, Inc.
    PO Box 190
    Hollister, CA 95024
    831.637.8527
    debi@...
    www.shearwaterjourneys.com
    www.shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com
    
    Celebrating 42 Years of Seabirding with Shearwater Journeys
  12. -back to top-
  13. Re: [CALBIRDS] Fwd: [MBBIRDS] Booby still present at Pt Pinos at 9:10 am LINK
    DATE: Jul 20, 2017 @ 3:35pm, 12 month(s) ago
    Alvaro,
    
    Thanks for the comments. My sample size was, as I had quoted [n = 33] and could easily be biased if not randomly selected among island populations or anything else, and is just one small sample.
    
    Here is what Jehl & Pitman (1998) Wilson Bull. 110: 155-170 have to say about tail differences between adults OB [orange-billed = Nazca] and YB [yellow-billed = Masked] in their published study which is the basis for today's split of the two species:
    
    > In addition, the central rectrices in OB birds tend to be pale at the base, as if dusted with flour, and the extent increasing with age, so that some older sub-adults appear white-rumped; in YB populations the rectrices average darker, and whitish bases, if present, are usually concealed by the upper tail coverts. In definitive plumage, OB and YB forms are similar, except that the dark areas tend to be a rich chocolate brown with a reddish tinge in OB birds, compared to dark brown to blackish in YB birds, and the central rectrices average paler and may be almost entirely white, a condition that is rare in all YB populations.
    
    Full paper at https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/journals/wilson/v110n02/p0155-p0170.pdf
    
    I was just looking at slides I took on my one-day cruise on a NOAA ship through the Galapagos in 1989. Photos of two adults off Espanola appear black-tailed but another photo'd two days later to the southwest clearly has a long all-white central rectrix. Plate 8 in Nelson's The Sulidae (1978) Oxford Univ Press shows a pair of granti on Tower Island with a chick -- one adults has an all black tail and the other has a white pair of central rectrices. So the variation may be widespread and not confined to particular populations. More research needed.
    
    You may be right that the overall global percentage is not 60%-40% in favor adults with white centrals, but Jehl & Pitman describe the difference in terms tendencies and averages, increasing with age, but the language is consistent with some Nazcas being dark-tailed and, apparently, some rare Masked having white central rectrices. Presuming that they are correct, the presence of a white central rectrix would not entirely rule out Masked Booby. My point was that not too much emphasis should be placed in this variable character. So again it would mostly come down to bill color.
    
    As to bill color, as you know, it is not simply "yellow" in Masked and "orange" in adult Nazca. Jehl & Pitman describe Galapagos populations of Nazca as having bills that are "rosy pink in females, more orange in males." My paper described the variation as "bright orange to coral-red" in Nazca, whilst in Masked it was "greenish-yellow to bright yellow, sometimes with a small orangey tip." I wish people would not describe the difference as a simple "orange" versus "yellow" in adults. I also describe bill color in subadults in the paper, as do Howell et al. in their book.
    
    In addition, I would not rule out the potential usefulness of bill shape. Jehl & Pitman note that
    
    > Discriminant function analysis showed that OB birds are generally smaller, having shallower bills, shorter tarsi, and longer wings (Table 4, Fig. 2). The smaller size of OB birds is further indicated by body mass, which averages 12-14% lighter than S. d. personata (Anderson 1993). They are also more sexually dimorphic in bill, wing, and tarsus than YB boobies
    
    They go into further depth on bill shape differences in the paper. To my eye, a perceptible 'dip' in the culmen of Nazca about two-thirds out to the tip, and narrowing at that point, provides a different bill aspect than the more straight-culmened heft of Masked. It is a bit subtle and there will surely be overlap, so it is more of a suggestive point, similar to the tail topic.
    
    Look forward to hearing about your Galapagos trip.
    
    Thanks, Don
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  15. Re: [CALBIRDS] Fwd: [MBBIRDS] Booby still present at Pt Pinos at 9:10 am LINK
    DATE: Jul 20, 2017 @ 3:10pm, 12 month(s) ago
    Not arguing; just want to clarify a few germane issues Don raised:
    
    All the specimens I examined, both Nazca and Masked, were from several colonies in Mexico. These are colonies that are hard to access and because the 2nd-cycle bird I was analyzing appeared in San Diego waters after a period of sustained monsoon winds coming from the south paralleling the Mexican coastline, and not from the west or southwest, I felt it more likely to be a Mexican bird. That individual, whose molt progression is very similar to that of today’s Monterey bird, showed black-tipped white central rectrices.
    
    Specimens I looked at had been identified as Nazca either by genetic testing or because they’d been collected in the colony with parents of known species identity.
    
    When I look at photos or specimens from the Galapagos, they seem to have far more extensive white in the tails than the Mexican birds I looked at. But I was looking at only late 1st-cycle or 2nd-cycle birds, and it is possible that with each succeeding molt that the central rectrices become more extensively white in Nazca.
    
    Also, I found that the central rectrices were molting in early during the molt sequence. [So I would say that a bird as advanced in body molt as the Monterey bird is already showing 2nd-cycle central rectrices.]
    
    I also solicited from birders going to the Galapagos, series of photos of individual birds in which they would take many photos of a given bird from slightly different angles, so I might have some sense of how slight changes of light coming into the camera or reflecting off the bill in different ways might affect the apparent color of the bill. And it does.
    
    As I said, mine was a small, casual study with an inadequate N, but I was very surprised to see the difference in central rectrices between [Mexican] Nazca and Masked booby even early on in 2nd cycle.
    
    As for hybrids in Mexican colonies, I leave that for Bob Pitman to address.
    
    And like I said, my study was suggestive, not definitive. As is said in the final sentence of every scientific paper: "More study is needed.” : ))
    
    Stan Walens
    
    San Diego
  16. -back to top-
  17. Nazca/Masked Booby from Oregon released today in San Pedro LINK
    DATE: Oct 9, 2015 @ 12:13pm, 3 year(s) ago
    Birders,
    
    The sub-adult Nazca/Masked Booby brought into rehab in Newport, Oregon on 11 September and transferred to the International Bird Rescue center in San Pedro around 1 October has completed rehabilitation and was released this morning around
    11:00 a.m. from Whites Point in San Pedro, L. A. Co.
    
    The bird was fitted with a USGS silver band on its left leg; unfortunately IBR did not have authorization to color band or otherwise uniquely mark this individual. If you see a bird in this plumage, check carefully for bands. Photos of
    the bird can be found at the IBR web site:
    http://blog.bird-rescue.org/index.php/2015/10/we-love-boobies/ (labeled as “Masked Booby).
    
    The apparent dull pinkish coloration on much of the basal and dorsal portions of the bill suggests that this bird is a Nazca Booby (and would represent the first record of this species from Oregon). However, Nazca and Masked are closely
    similar in immature plumages and final determination, if there is to be one, will rest on DNA work from a preserved blood sample, perhaps augmented by information on measurements, plumage pattern and bill color.
    
    A Red-footed Booby brought into IBR on 13 September from Redondo Beach remains in rehab, but will probably be healthy enough to release at some point – I’ll post news of that release if an when it happens. This is the bird standing next
    to the Nazca/Masked Booby in the photo on the IBR web site.
    
    Kimball
    
    Kimball L. Garrett
    Ornithology Collections Manager
    Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County
    900 Exposition Blvd.
    Los Angeles, CA 90007 USA
    (213) 763-3368
    kgarrett@...
    http://www.nhm.org/site/research-collections/ornithology
    
  18. -back to top-
  19. Fwd: [SanDiegoRegionBirding] Hornblower trips; some comments on recent booby sightings; Nazca i.d. LINK
    DATE: Aug 25, 2014 @ 6:02pm, 4 year(s) ago
    On August 17, a masked/Nazca-type booby was photographed 6 miles south of the U.S. border, in Mexican waters. It was a third-year/subadult bird, with a bill that was orange at the base but yellow for the distal half. Photographs are linked to in the bottom part of this message.There has been much offlist discussion of this bird, but we are looking for sulid experts who might have developed/discovered/studied any diagnostic characteristics for Nazca vs. masked booby in. See Sue Smith’s clarification to my post.
    
    The question: Can masked boobies be told from Nazca boobies at ages less than full adult And what features can be used to separate either from masked/Nazca hybrids in subadult stages
    
    Sue and my email addresses are embedded in the email headings. Thanks in advance for your help.
    
    Stan Walens
    San DiegoBegin forwarded message:
    From: Susan Smith <seiurus ataoldotcom>
    Subject: Re: [SanDiegoRegionBirding] Hornblower trips; some comments on recent booby sightings; Nazca i.d.
    Date: August 24, 2014 at 5:45:03 PM PDT
    To: stan.walens atgmaildotcom, sandiegoregionbirding@yahoogroups.com
    
    To Stan and SDRBirders,
    To perhaps clarify a bit more about the Nazca or Nazca-Masked Booby thing, I'll try to paraphrase some recent comments I got from by Bob Pitman (NOAA,Southwest Fisheries Science Center, La Jolla), who wrote the original paper with Jehl on separating out these two species. What Bob said was that he could only rule out a "pure" Masked Booby based on the photographs, but he could not rule out a Nazca- Masked Booby hybrid based on his experience. He hadn't worked on the large Nazca colonies much (only those colonies where both species overlap, e.g Clipperton) to have had enough experience with the 3rd year plumage of Nazca Boobies to tell definitively whether last Sunday's bird was a pure Nazca rather than a hybrid. So its still possible it could be a third year Nazca. He also added that sub-adults tend to be rare on the breeding colonies, where most people study these birds, so maybe we will never know unless this same bird is seen and photographed again next year (at presumed full adulthood). Nonetheless, he suggested that someone might want to contact people working with the Nazcas on the Galapagos. They may have more experience with this particular plumage, and might have some useful photos. Or maybe they could comment on Christopher's photos. I looked up some Nazca Booby research and there is a Dr. David Anderson of Wake Forest University, N.C. (behavioral studies on Nazcas at Galapagos)who might have some comments on this. Some of you out there who are more familiar with the sulid literature and may know of researchers at the Galapagos who might also be of help.
    Happy Sulid-ing...Sue
    
    Susan SmithSeiurus Biological Consulting
    Del Mar, CA
    
    
  20. -back to top-
  21. Masked Booby-San Mateo County LINK
    DATE: Aug 12, 2014 @ 7:12am, 4 year(s) ago
    Ron just called he is in Moss Beach doing a seawatch at 7am he saw an adult MASKED BOOBY flying north. Details to follow later.
    
    The messenger from home,
    Leonie Batkin for Ron Thorn
    
    
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  23. Re: [CALBIRDS] Fwd: [LACoBirds] Masked booby spotted off coast of Palos Verdes LINK
    DATE: Jun 28, 2014, 4 year(s) ago
    I’ve certainly seen Nazca boobies with yellow eyes in the field [obviously, not in the continental U.S.], and there are numerous photos of yellow-eyed Nazca boobies on the internet.I don’t know enough about the morphology of Nazca booby to know if eye color is an age-related, sex-related, breeding-condition-related or population-variable characteristic.
    
    Another potential field mark, if I understand it correctly, is the shallow concavity of the culmen.
    
    Stan Walens
    San Diego
    
    On Jun 28, 2014, at 10:10 AM, Wanda <wandadameron2@...> wrote:
    The bill sure looks pink (vs. yellow) and possibly shorter, tho the eye is difficult to tell: more yellow than the needed orangeWanda DameronSan Fernando Valley
    
    
  24. -back to top-
  25. Re: [CALBIRDS] Fwd: [LACoBirds] Masked booby spotted off coast of Palos Verdes LINK
    DATE: Jun 28, 2014, 4 year(s) ago
    The bill sure looks pink (vs. yellow)
    and possibly shorter, tho the eye is difficult to tell: more
    yellow than the needed orange
    
    Wanda Dameron
    San Fernando Valley
    
    On 6/28/2014 9:14 AM, Stan Walens stan.walens@... [CALBIRDS]
    wrote:
    Wendy Miller posted a note to LA County Birds listserv
    with a link to photos by Tim Hammond.
    I believe the photos show an adult Nazca booby, and
    that this would be a first documented record for the
    continental U.S.
    Opinions
    
    Photos are here:
    http://whales.smugmug.com/Harbor-Breeze-06272014-3/i-ZN79CS2/A
    
    Having troubles with my email server; sorry if posts
    have appeared several times.
    
    Stan Walens
    San Diego
    
    << Previous post in topic
    Next post in topic
  26. -back to top-
  27. Fwd: [LACoBirds] Masked booby spotted off coast of Palos Verdes LINK
    DATE: Jun 28, 2014, 4 year(s) ago
    Wendy Miller posted a note to LA County Birds listserv with a link to photos by Tim Hammond.I believe the photos show an adult Nazca booby, and that this would be a first documented record for the continental U.S.
    Opinions
    
    Photos are here:
    http://whales.smugmug.com/Harbor-Breeze-06272014-3/i-ZN79CS2/A
    
    Having troubles with my email server; sorry if posts have appeared several times.
    
    Stan Walens
    San Diego
    
    Next post in topic
  28. -back to top-
  29. Updated Masked Booby Info LINK
    DATE: Nov 14, 2013 @ 2:53pm, 5 year(s) ago
    
    
    
    
    
    There are two 2 -2 1/2 hr trips daily: noon & 3pm. They have
    most often been seen on the way back of the 3
    pm trip, with the premise the Boobies are probably out
    feeding during the day & coming back to one of the buoys at days
    end to rest overnight. Makes a problem for driving home in traffic
    so you may want to stop for dinner first.
    
    If you want to confirm the birds were seen the previous day, call 562-432-4900. In any event, do let them
    know you are there to see the Boobies and they will take extra
    efforts to find them. (Hopefully the Captain will follow thru and
    start putting positive & negative reports on our LACoBirds@yahoogroups.com
    website, plus let us know about the Short-tailed Shearwater that
    shows up in Jan or Feb.)
    
    Tickets may be purchased there or ahead at www.2seewhales.com.
    
    Regular tickets there are $45 with senior tix at $40. Bit less
    if you buy online, w/ the mid-week cost at $35 plus $2 fee totaling
    $37. If two going is purchasing get 2 tix
    for $49 from Groupon.com. Best bet
    is ask for the Captain's Facebook Special is still good which has
    been $25 per person.
    
    Directions: From the 405 Fwy, go south on the 710
    LongBeach/Pasadena Fwy south 10 miles. Take the well-marked
    Downtown/Aquarium exit to the left onto W. Shoreline Drive , then to
    Aquarium for 1.9 mi. Turn right onto S. Pine Ave a block which
    takes you to the easiest parking which is in the Aquarium parking
    structure for $8. Exit left from the Aquarium parking structure
    elevators toward Harbor Breeze Cruises in Rainbow Harbor just
    behind the roundabout.
    
    Other thoughts: Days aren't always as wonderful, so be sure to
    have a wind-proof & warm jacket, hat w/a cord, sunglasses.
    Maybe clear soda & soda crax if you tend to be seasick.
    Food/drinks available on board. Some of us are planning to go on
    the Fri 3 pm trip if bird seen today.
    
    Cheers & Good Luck,
    Wanda Dameron
    West San Fernando Valley
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
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-revision history-
v1.30 - 01/05/16 - Revamped cloud logic, optimized database queries, linked to eBird rarities.
v1.23 - 12/08/11 - Added direct link to CBRC records.
v1.22 - 12/03/11 - Corrected GMT offsets on dates. Added last 5 posts at top.
v1.21 - 11/24/11 - Added direct link to range map for NA birds.
v1.2  - 11/23/11 - Greatly improved graphing technology - separates month vs. year by posts. Added species auto-complete functionality.
v1.14 - 11/22/11 - Added cloud bubble for common thread topics.
v1.13 - 11/22/11 - Added integrated photos where available.
v1.12 - 11/22/11 - Added multiple input boxes for additional refinement, negative search criteria (eg. -keyword).
v1.11 - 11/22/11 - Added banding code, species look-up. Also direct link to recent eBird observations.
 v1.1 - 11/22/11 - Added 'date' functionality. Shows top 'month/year' combinations for a query. Restrict results to that 'month/year'.
 v1.0 - 11/21/11 - Initial version coded. Currently archiving 'lacobirds' and 'calbirds'.