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  68 result(s) found...Displaying messages 1 through 15, sorted by date descending.
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 Month/Year Breakdown (Top 15):

 Apr, 2016 - 23 e-mail(s)...
 Apr, 2018 - 18 e-mail(s)...
 Apr, 2014 - 11 e-mail(s)...
 Oct, 2013 - 5 e-mail(s)...
 Jun, 2018 - 4 e-mail(s)...
 Oct, 2011 - 4 e-mail(s)...
 Feb, 2014 - 2 e-mail(s)...
 Nov, 2011 - 1 e-mail(s)...



   Marsh Sandpiper
Marsh Sandpiper
Tringa stagnatilis


   Marsh Sandpiper (Tringa stagnatilis) - MASA (recent eBird sightings, view CBRC records)

  1. Re: [CALBIRDS] CBRC review and request for documentation LINK
    DATE: Jun 1, 2018 @ 5:01pm, 6 month(s) ago
    Tom
    The part about people deleting their eBird records/photos makes sense!
    Tom
    
    On Fri, Jun 1, 2018, 3:28 PM Thomas Benson tbenson@... [CALBIRDS] < CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com > wrote:
    
    Tom, eBird and the CBRC are two separate entities. Submitting documentation to one does not mean you have submitted documentation to the other. The CBRC reviews records
    of statewide significance, and we maintain our own archives so that we or others are able to review that documentation at a later date if necessary. If we relied on eBird to archive our documentation, there is the possibility that a user could delete his/her
    photos or checklists, or alter the descriptions, defeating the purpose of an archive. There is no plan to merge these processes in the future. Tom
    Thomas A. Benson Secretary, California Bird Records Committee From: T.G. Miko [mailto: tgmiko@... ]
    
    Sent: Friday, June 1, 2018 3:11 PM
    
    To: Thomas Benson < TBenson@... >
    
    Cc: CALBIRDS < CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com >
    
    Subject: Re: [CALBIRDS] CBRC review and request for documentation Tom et Al, I apologise for this question if I, or others have asked this in the past:
    If we posted photos into our eBird entries, why do you need our photos or written descriptions Is there a plan to merge these processes in the future
    Tom Miko
    Claremont LA County
    909.241.3300
    On Fri, Jun 1, 2018, 2:51 PM Thomas Benson
    tbenson@... [CALBIRDS] < CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com > wrote:
    
    California birders,
    
    The California Bird Records Committee (CBRC) will begin reviewing the following records in late June. If you have any documentation to submit for these records, please do so as soon as possible. Feel free to forward this request to local listservs as appropriate.
    Thank you.
    
    Tom
    
    Thomas A. Benson
    Secretary, California Bird Records Committee
    
    King Eider 2018-008 4 Jan 2018 Sutro Baths SF (single observer, documentation complete)
    Buff-collared Nightjar 2018-029 28 Mar 2018 Corona RIV (single observer, documentation complete)
    Marsh Sandpiper 2018-033 15-21 Apr 2018 Yolo Bypass YOL (documentation from 4 observers, addl doc. requested)
    Thick-billed Murre 2018-004 9-19 Mar 2018 Redwood Natl Park DN (single observer, documentation complete)
    Black Vulture 2018-012 22-29 Jan 2018 Doran Reg. Park SON (no documentation received, documentation requested)
    Black Vulture 2018-023 15 Feb-6 Mar 2018 Davenport/Ano Nuevo SCZ/SM (documentation from 3 observers, addl doc. requested)
    Black Vulture 2018-024 12 Feb 2018 Bolinas MRN (single observer, documentation complete)
    Blue-headed Vireo 2018-027 14 Feb-27 Mar 2018 LA River LA (documentation from 3 observers, addl doc. requested)
    Golden-winged Warbler 2018-04522 May 2018 Zzyzx SBE (single observer, documentation complete)
    Graces Warbler 2018-042 5 May 2018 Blue Ridge LA (single observer, documentation complete)
    
    What kind of documentation should one submit to the CBRC Following are some guidelines for submitting media and written descriptions that will be useful for helping the CBRC evaluate records and archive documentation. Documentation may be submitted directly
    to the secretary via email ( secretary@... ) , or by using the online submission form ( http://www.californiabirds.org/report_sighting.html ).
    
    Media: This includes photos, audio recordings, and video. Photographs are usually the most useful documentation for evaluating records. If you have reasonably good (=identifiable) photos, please submit them. If possible, please crop the photos before submission
    so that the bird fills most of the frame. Also, please send originals whenever possible, and not screenshots or back-of-camera photos. How many photos should you submit That really depends on the record. If it is a long-staying rarity that is easily identifiable
    and seen by dozens of people, then a few photos (1-3 per person) are sufficient. If it is a mega-rarity that is difficult to identify and only seen by a one or few people, then send as many photos as possible that show the bird at different angles, postures,
    lighting, etc. Sometimes it is also useful to submit audio and/or video recordings of the bird, as some birds are more easily identified by their vocalizations. If relatively short, most audio recordings are small enough to be submitted via email; please submit
    those along with a brief note indicating the date and location of the recording. Large audio files and video files can be submitted by using a file sharing service; please contact the secretary if you need to submit a file that is too large for email.
    
    Written descriptions: Some written details should always be provided even the best photos should be accompanied by the name of the observer, the date, and the location, at a minimum. Sometimes a photo cant be obtained or vocalizations cant be recorded.
    In some cases, behaviors might be noted in the field that arent preserved well by photos. In these cases, it is helpful to submit a written description of the bird. Ideally, this description should be written as soon after observing the bird as possible;
    it is often helpful to make written notes in the field, or even dictate notes into the voice recorder on your smartphone while observing the bird, from which you can later generate a written description. The most important aspect of a written description is
    that you report only what you observed, and not a general description of the bird from a field guide. At a minimum, your description should include the date and location of the observation, and a description of the bird (size and structure, plumage, vocalizations,
    behavior). A brief discussion of how the bird was identified, and how similar species were eliminated is also helpful. Other useful information you might report includes optics used, distance from bird, lighting or weather conditions, length of time viewed,
    and other observers present.
  2. -back to top-
  3. Re: [CALBIRDS] CBRC review and request for documentation LINK
    DATE: Jun 1, 2018 @ 3:10pm, 6 month(s) ago
    Tom et Al, I apologise for this question if I, or others have asked this in the past:
    If we posted photos into our eBird entries, why do you need our photos or written descriptions Is there a plan to merge these processes in the future
    Tom Miko
    Claremont LA County
    909.241.3300
    
    On Fri, Jun 1, 2018, 2:51 PM Thomas Benson tbenson@... [CALBIRDS] < CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com > wrote:
    
    California birders, The California Bird Records Committee (CBRC) will begin reviewing the following records in late June. If you have any documentation to submit for these records, please do so as soon as possible. Feel free to forward this request to local
    listservs as appropriate. Thank you. Tom Thomas A. Benson Secretary, California Bird Records Committee King Eider 2018-008 4 Jan 2018 Sutro Baths SF (single observer, documentation complete) Buff-collared Nightjar 2018-029 28 Mar 2018 Corona RIV (single observer, documentation complete) Marsh Sandpiper 2018-033 15-21 Apr 2018 Yolo Bypass YOL (documentation from 4 observers, addl doc. requested) Thick-billed Murre 2018-004 9-19 Mar 2018 Redwood Natl Park DN (single observer, documentation complete) Black Vulture 2018-012 22-29 Jan 2018 Doran Reg. Park SON (no documentation received, documentation requested) Black Vulture 2018-023 15 Feb-6 Mar 2018 Davenport/Ano Nuevo SCZ/SM (documentation from 3 observers, addl doc. requested) Black Vulture 2018-024 12 Feb 2018 Bolinas MRN (single observer, documentation complete) Blue-headed Vireo 2018-027 14 Feb-27 Mar 2018 LA River LA (documentation from 3 observers, addl doc. requested) Golden-winged Warbler 2018-04522 May 2018 Zzyzx SBE (single observer, documentation complete) Graces Warbler 2018-042 5 May 2018 Blue Ridge LA (single observer, documentation complete) What kind of documentation should one submit to the CBRC Following are some guidelines for submitting media and written descriptions that will be useful for helping the CBRC evaluate records and archive documentation. Documentation may
    be submitted directly to the secretary via email ( secretary@... ) , or by using the online submission form ( http://www.californiabirds.org/report_sighting.html ). Media: This includes photos, audio recordings, and video. Photographs are usually the most useful documentation for evaluating records. If you have reasonably good (=identifiable) photos, please submit them. If possible, please crop the
    photos before submission so that the bird fills most of the frame. Also, please send originals whenever possible, and not screenshots or back-of-camera photos. How many photos should you submit That really depends on the record. If it is a long-staying rarity
    that is easily identifiable and seen by dozens of people, then a few photos (1-3 per person) are sufficient. If it is a mega-rarity that is difficult to identify and only seen by a one or few people, then send as many photos as possible that show the bird
    at different angles, postures, lighting, etc. Sometimes it is also useful to submit audio and/or video recordings of the bird, as some birds are more easily identified by their vocalizations. If relatively short, most audio recordings are small enough to be
    submitted via email; please submit those along with a brief note indicating the date and location of the recording. Large audio files and video files can be submitted by using a file sharing service; please contact the secretary if you need to submit a file
    that is too large for email. Written descriptions: Some written details should always be provided even the best photos should be accompanied by the name of the observer, the date, and the location, at a minimum. Sometimes a photo cant be obtained or vocalizations
    cant be recorded. In some cases, behaviors might be noted in the field that arent preserved well by photos. In these cases, it is helpful to submit a written description of the bird. Ideally, this description should be written as soon after observing the
    bird as possible; it is often helpful to make written notes in the field, or even dictate notes into the voice recorder on your smartphone while observing the bird, from which you can later generate a written description. The most important aspect of a written
    description is that you report only what you observed, and not a general description of the bird from a field guide. At a minimum, your description should include the date and location of the observation, and a description of the bird (size and structure,
    plumage, vocalizations, behavior). A brief discussion of how the bird was identified, and how similar species were eliminated is also helpful. Other useful information you might report includes optics used, distance from bird, lighting or weather conditions,
    length of time viewed, and other observers present. 
  4. -back to top-
  5. RE: [CALBIRDS] CBRC review and request for documentation LINK
    DATE: Jun 1, 2018 @ 3:27pm, 6 month(s) ago
    Tom, eBird and the CBRC are two separate entities. Submitting documentation to one does not mean you have submitted documentation to the other. The CBRC reviews records
    of statewide significance, and we maintain our own archives so that we or others are able to review that documentation at a later date if necessary. If we relied on eBird to archive our documentation, there is the possibility that a user could delete his/her
    photos or checklists, or alter the descriptions, defeating the purpose of an archive. There is no plan to merge these processes in the future. Tom
    Thomas A. Benson Secretary, California Bird Records Committee From: T.G. Miko [mailto:tgmiko@...]
    
    Sent: Friday, June 1, 2018 3:11 PM
    
    To: Thomas Benson
    
    Cc: CALBIRDS
    
    Subject: Re: [CALBIRDS] CBRC review and request for documentation Tom et Al, I apologise for this question if I, or others have asked this in the past:
    If we posted photos into our eBird entries, why do you need our photos or written descriptions Is there a plan to merge these processes in the future
    Tom Miko
    Claremont LA County
    909.241.3300
    On Fri, Jun 1, 2018, 2:51 PM Thomas Benson
    tbenson@... [CALBIRDS] < CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com > wrote:
    
    California birders,
    
    The California Bird Records Committee (CBRC) will begin reviewing the following records in late June. If you have any documentation to submit for these records, please do so as soon as possible. Feel free to forward this request to local listservs as appropriate.
    Thank you.
    
    Tom
    
    Thomas A. Benson
    Secretary, California Bird Records Committee
    
    King Eider 2018-008 4 Jan 2018 Sutro Baths SF (single observer, documentation complete)
    Buff-collared Nightjar 2018-029 28 Mar 2018 Corona RIV (single observer, documentation complete)
    Marsh Sandpiper 2018-033 15-21 Apr 2018 Yolo Bypass YOL (documentation from 4 observers, addl doc. requested)
    Thick-billed Murre 2018-004 9-19 Mar 2018 Redwood Natl Park DN (single observer, documentation complete)
    Black Vulture 2018-012 22-29 Jan 2018 Doran Reg. Park SON (no documentation received, documentation requested)
    Black Vulture 2018-023 15 Feb-6 Mar 2018 Davenport/Ano Nuevo SCZ/SM (documentation from 3 observers, addl doc. requested)
    Black Vulture 2018-024 12 Feb 2018 Bolinas MRN (single observer, documentation complete)
    Blue-headed Vireo 2018-027 14 Feb-27 Mar 2018 LA River LA (documentation from 3 observers, addl doc. requested)
    Golden-winged Warbler 2018-04522 May 2018 Zzyzx SBE (single observer, documentation complete)
    Graces Warbler 2018-042 5 May 2018 Blue Ridge LA (single observer, documentation complete)
    
    What kind of documentation should one submit to the CBRC Following are some guidelines for submitting media and written descriptions that will be useful for helping the CBRC evaluate records and archive documentation. Documentation may be submitted directly
    to the secretary via email ( secretary@... ) , or by using the online submission form ( http://www.californiabirds.org/report_sighting.html ).
    
    Media: This includes photos, audio recordings, and video. Photographs are usually the most useful documentation for evaluating records. If you have reasonably good (=identifiable) photos, please submit them. If possible, please crop the photos before submission
    so that the bird fills most of the frame. Also, please send originals whenever possible, and not screenshots or back-of-camera photos. How many photos should you submit That really depends on the record. If it is a long-staying rarity that is easily identifiable
    and seen by dozens of people, then a few photos (1-3 per person) are sufficient. If it is a mega-rarity that is difficult to identify and only seen by a one or few people, then send as many photos as possible that show the bird at different angles, postures,
    lighting, etc. Sometimes it is also useful to submit audio and/or video recordings of the bird, as some birds are more easily identified by their vocalizations. If relatively short, most audio recordings are small enough to be submitted via email; please submit
    those along with a brief note indicating the date and location of the recording. Large audio files and video files can be submitted by using a file sharing service; please contact the secretary if you need to submit a file that is too large for email.
    
    Written descriptions: Some written details should always be provided even the best photos should be accompanied by the name of the observer, the date, and the location, at a minimum. Sometimes a photo cant be obtained or vocalizations cant be recorded.
    In some cases, behaviors might be noted in the field that arent preserved well by photos. In these cases, it is helpful to submit a written description of the bird. Ideally, this description should be written as soon after observing the bird as possible;
    it is often helpful to make written notes in the field, or even dictate notes into the voice recorder on your smartphone while observing the bird, from which you can later generate a written description. The most important aspect of a written description is
    that you report only what you observed, and not a general description of the bird from a field guide. At a minimum, your description should include the date and location of the observation, and a description of the bird (size and structure, plumage, vocalizations,
    behavior). A brief discussion of how the bird was identified, and how similar species were eliminated is also helpful. Other useful information you might report includes optics used, distance from bird, lighting or weather conditions, length of time viewed,
    and other observers present.
  6. -back to top-
  7. CBRC review and request for documentation LINK
    DATE: Jun 1, 2018 @ 2:48pm, 6 month(s) ago
    California birders, The California Bird Records Committee (CBRC) will begin reviewing the following records in late June. If you have any documentation to submit for these records, please do so as soon as possible. Feel free to forward this request to local
    listservs as appropriate. Thank you. Tom Thomas A. Benson Secretary, California Bird Records Committee King Eider 2018-008 4 Jan 2018 Sutro Baths SF (single observer, documentation complete) Buff-collared Nightjar 2018-029 28 Mar 2018 Corona RIV (single observer, documentation complete) Marsh Sandpiper 2018-033 15-21 Apr 2018 Yolo Bypass YOL (documentation from 4 observers, addl doc. requested) Thick-billed Murre 2018-004 9-19 Mar 2018 Redwood Natl Park DN (single observer, documentation complete) Black Vulture 2018-012 22-29 Jan 2018 Doran Reg. Park SON (no documentation received, documentation requested) Black Vulture 2018-023 15 Feb-6 Mar 2018 Davenport/Ano Nuevo SCZ/SM (documentation from 3 observers, addl doc. requested) Black Vulture 2018-024 12 Feb 2018 Bolinas MRN (single observer, documentation complete) Blue-headed Vireo 2018-027 14 Feb-27 Mar 2018 LA River LA (documentation from 3 observers, addl doc. requested) Golden-winged Warbler 2018-04522 May 2018 Zzyzx SBE (single observer, documentation complete) Graces Warbler 2018-042 5 May 2018 Blue Ridge LA (single observer, documentation complete) What kind of documentation should one submit to the CBRC Following are some guidelines for submitting media and written descriptions that will be useful for helping the CBRC evaluate records and archive documentation. Documentation may
    be submitted directly to the secretary via email ( secretary@... ) , or by using the online submission form ( http://www.californiabirds.org/report_sighting.html ). Media: This includes photos, audio recordings, and video. Photographs are usually the most useful documentation for evaluating records. If you have reasonably good (=identifiable) photos, please submit them. If possible, please crop the
    photos before submission so that the bird fills most of the frame. Also, please send originals whenever possible, and not screenshots or back-of-camera photos. How many photos should you submit That really depends on the record. If it is a long-staying rarity
    that is easily identifiable and seen by dozens of people, then a few photos (1-3 per person) are sufficient. If it is a mega-rarity that is difficult to identify and only seen by a one or few people, then send as many photos as possible that show the bird
    at different angles, postures, lighting, etc. Sometimes it is also useful to submit audio and/or video recordings of the bird, as some birds are more easily identified by their vocalizations. If relatively short, most audio recordings are small enough to be
    submitted via email; please submit those along with a brief note indicating the date and location of the recording. Large audio files and video files can be submitted by using a file sharing service; please contact the secretary if you need to submit a file
    that is too large for email. Written descriptions: Some written details should always be provided even the best photos should be accompanied by the name of the observer, the date, and the location, at a minimum. Sometimes a photo cant be obtained or vocalizations
    cant be recorded. In some cases, behaviors might be noted in the field that arent preserved well by photos. In these cases, it is helpful to submit a written description of the bird. Ideally, this description should be written as soon after observing the
    bird as possible; it is often helpful to make written notes in the field, or even dictate notes into the voice recorder on your smartphone while observing the bird, from which you can later generate a written description. The most important aspect of a written
    description is that you report only what you observed, and not a general description of the bird from a field guide. At a minimum, your description should include the date and location of the observation, and a description of the bird (size and structure,
    plumage, vocalizations, behavior). A brief discussion of how the bird was identified, and how similar species were eliminated is also helpful. Other useful information you might report includes optics used, distance from bird, lighting or weather conditions,
    length of time viewed, and other observers present. 
  8. -back to top-
  9. Incorrect Yolo Bypass hotspot LINK
    DATE: Apr 22, 2018 @ 11:38am, 7 month(s) ago
    Hi Folks, I am copying and pasting from a personal email that I wrote to somebody this morning. The reason that I'm writing the email is that for those of you who live in that part of the state, you know where the Yolo Bypass bird area is, but for people coming from far away it is not a good thing that you guys have an official eBird Hotspot that will mislead people and put them out into the middle of nowhere, quite far from the actual wildlife area. You guys are going to want to fix that hot spot or move it over a couple hundred yards so the people don't wind up taking 10 Mile detours like I did yesterday. Before writing this email, I just double-checked to make sure that I'm not seeing something that is incorrect. The eBird hotspot for the driving Loop is the one that I'm referring to, and it is the one that I used:
    Yes, I got the Marsh Sandpiper, and the Ruff. I can't believe that the eBird report that I used for its presence had the hotspot for Yolo Bypass up on the dike (levee). I used that eBird hotspot via Google maps, and it had me drive west into the town to the west of the wildlife area, and then come in driving east on a bunch of dirt roads in between farm houses, eventually winding up on the levee able to see people down below me to the east of me, but unable to get to them. There is a gate on the levee, but it was locked (I checked). If that gate had not been locked, I could have driven down, then right into the parking lot. Instead, I had to backtrack all the way around. I lost two hours, which was useful because the time I lost got me home to my house in LA at 10:00 instead of 8:00 p.m. (I left my house at 5:00 a.m.).
    One thing that added to my confusion and cause me to ignore the sign on the street and to follow what Google Maps was telling me to do was the fact that various emails regarding the YOLO Bypass Wildlife Area discuss one way loops on the auto tour, which caused me to assume that Google Maps is having me loop around the area to come in from the correct, acceptable direction.
    I don't know if that hot spot is the official one for the Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area is the official one, or if it is one that some random person put there.
    Tom
  10. -back to top-
  11. Marsh Sandpiper continues in Yolo LINK
    DATE: Apr 21, 2018 @ 8:16am, 7 month(s) ago
  12. -back to top-
  13. Re: [CALBIRDS] Marsh Sandpiper update LINK
    DATE: Apr 21, 2018 @ 1:26pm, 7 month(s) ago
    Call me ! I am here, lost, but can't get across the water to you. I am on the lever road. Tom
    909.241.3300
    
    On Sat, Apr 21, 2018, 1:09 PM Justyn Stahl < justyn.stahl@... > wrote:
    
    It’s been refound and in view at 1306. Well west of parking lot E and the pump station, just east of a false parking lot where the hunter check station is during hunting season. 38.5308, -121.619
    
    Justyn Stahl
    San Clemente Island
    
    On Sat, Apr 21, 2018 at 11:25 AM 'T.G. Miko' tgmiko@... [CALBIRDS] < CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com > wrote:
    
      OMG, you are making me really nervous! I am somewhere between Stockton and Sacramento on the 5. I left La at 6 this morning.. I can't believe how many Swainson's Hawks I have seen along the 5 freeway today, along with an adult bald eagle in Stanislaus County.
    
    On Sat, Apr 21, 2018, 11:04 AM Steve Hampton stevechampton@... [CALBIRDS] < CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com > wrote:
    
       Some people are reporting that the Marsh Sandpiper  flew off to the east and went down somewhere north parking lot H 
    
    It does not seem to be along the return route  of the tour loop at the moment 
    
    --
    
    Steve Hampton
    
    Davis, CA
  14. -back to top-
  15. Re: [CALBIRDS] Marsh Sandpiper update LINK
    DATE: Apr 21, 2018 @ 1:09pm, 7 month(s) ago
    It’s been refound and in view at 1306. Well west of parking lot E and the pump station, just east of a false parking lot where the hunter check station is during hunting season. 38.5308, -121.619
    
    Justyn Stahl
    San Clemente Island
    
    On Sat, Apr 21, 2018 at 11:25 AM 'T.G. Miko' tgmiko@... [CALBIRDS] < CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com > wrote:
    
      OMG, you are making me really nervous! I am somewhere between Stockton and Sacramento on the 5. I left La at 6 this morning.. I can't believe how many Swainson's Hawks I have seen along the 5 freeway today, along with an adult bald eagle in Stanislaus County.
    
    On Sat, Apr 21, 2018, 11:04 AM Steve Hampton stevechampton@... [CALBIRDS] < CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com > wrote:
    
       Some people are reporting that the Marsh Sandpiper  flew off to the east and went down somewhere north parking lot H 
    
    It does not seem to be along the return route  of the tour loop at the moment 
    
    --
    
    Steve Hampton
    
    Davis, CA
  16. -back to top-
  17. RFI YOLO Bypass LINK
    DATE: Apr 21, 2018 @ 12:41pm, 7 month(s) ago
    Saturday 1240 pm
    Hi, I am using Google maps to get to the eBird hotspots where the Marsh Sandpiper is supposed to be, and I might be close to the right location but I am out in the middle of a grassy field in the middle of nowhere, somewhere vaguely south of Highway 80. Google Maps had me drive on a bunch of unmarked unlabeled roads.I would really appreciate it if somebody could please call me up at 909.241.3300 Tom Miko
  18. -back to top-
  19. Re: [CALBIRDS] Marsh Sandpiper update LINK
    DATE: Apr 21, 2018 @ 11:18am, 7 month(s) ago
    OMG, you are making me really nervous! I am somewhere between Stockton and Sacramento on the 5. I left La at 6 this morning. I can't believe how many Swainson's Hawks I have seen along the 5 freeway today, along with an adult bald eagle in Stanislaus County.
    
    On Sat, Apr 21, 2018, 11:04 AM Steve Hampton stevechampton@... [CALBIRDS] < CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com > wrote:
    
       Some people are reporting that the Marsh Sandpiper  flew off to the east and went down somewhere north parking lot H 
    
    It does not seem to be along the return route  of the tour loop at the moment 
    
    --
    
    Steve Hampton
    
    Davis, CA
  20. -back to top-
  21. Marsh Sandpiper update LINK
    DATE: Apr 21, 2018 @ 11:04am, 7 month(s) ago
     Some people are reporting that the Marsh Sandpiper  flew off to the east and went down somewhere north parking lot H 
    
    It does not seem to be along the return route  of the tour loop at the moment 
    
    --
    
    Steve Hampton
    
    Davis, CA
  22. -back to top-
  23. Re: [CALBIRDS] Marsh Sandpiper Fri/Saturday? LINK
    DATE: Apr 20, 2018 @ 9:20am, 7 month(s) ago
    Thanks!
    If I call of from work, I won't be home to take my kids to swim class, after school, today, so I feel like I should only go tomorrow early in the morning (6 and 1/2 hours from my house to Yolo) but I waited until "Saturday" one of the previous years, and the bird flew away one hour (ONE HOUR!!!) before we arrived, and we waited until the sun went down, and never saw it.
    Tom
    
    Thomas Geza Miko
    http://www.tgmiko.com/
    Claremont, Los Angeles County, California
    909.241.3300
    
    On Fri, Apr 20, 2018 at 9:16 AM, Gil Ewing < gewing1@... > wrote:
    Marsh Sandpiper still at SW corner of auto tour loop at Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area at this time on Friday April 20
    
    Gil Ewing
    Fair Oaks, CA
    
    Sent from my iPhone
    
    On Apr 20, 2018, at 7:55 AM, 'T.G. Miko' tgmiko@... [CALBIRDS] < CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups. com > wrote:
    
    Hi I am very frustrated that that bird shows up each year on a Sunday or Monday and stays doing the work week when I have to go to work and then it disappears by Saturday. I have been studying the dates of when this bird shows up and leaves and it has stayed as long as April 23rd. I'm seriously considering leaving Los Angeles today Friday, or perhaps leaving at 5 in the morning tomorrow, Saturday April 21, but I don't want to drive there alone. If somebody would like to ride with me and keep me awake and maybe pay some gas money from anywhere in Southern California please contact me. Also, if the bird is seen today Friday or during the weekend please post as soon as possible. I appreciate the fact that you folks have been trying to keep fresh information each day out there.
    Tom Miko
    Claremont LA County
    909.241.3300 cell
  24. -back to top-
  25. Re: [CALBIRDS] Marsh Sandpiper Fri/Saturday? LINK
    DATE: Apr 20, 2018 @ 9:16am, 7 month(s) ago
    Marsh Sandpiper still at SW corner of auto tour loop at Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area at this time on Friday April 20
    
    Gil Ewing
    Fair Oaks, CA
    
    Sent from my iPhone
    
    On Apr 20, 2018, at 7:55 AM, 'T.G. Miko' tgmiko@... [CALBIRDS] < CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com > wrote:
  26. -back to top-
  27. Marsh Sandpiper Fri/Saturday? LINK
    DATE: Apr 20, 2018 @ 7:55am, 7 month(s) ago
    Hi I am very frustrated that that bird shows up each year on a Sunday or Monday and stays doing the work week when I have to go to work and then it disappears by Saturday. I have been studying the dates of when this bird shows up and leaves and it has stayed as long as April 23rd. I'm seriously considering leaving Los Angeles today Friday, or perhaps leaving at 5 in the morning tomorrow, Saturday April 21, but I don't want to drive there alone. If somebody would like to ride with me and keep me awake and maybe pay some gas money from anywhere in Southern California please contact me. Also, if the bird is seen today Friday or during the weekend please post as soon as possible. I appreciate the fact that you folks have been trying to keep fresh information each day out there.
    Tom Miko
    Claremont LA County
    909.241.3300 cell
  28. -back to top-
  29. Marsh Sandpiper, April 19 LINK
    DATE: Apr 19, 2018 @ 1:48pm, 7 month(s) ago
    According to eBird, the Yolo MASA continues this morning:
    
    https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S44727584
    
    "Continuing bird along the
    northbound one-way return loop. I relocated this bird almost immediately
    this morning in the pond on the left hand side at the southern most
    area. It was foraging at a distance out in the open but also repeated
    going behind clumps of rushes so that it was no longer visible without
    repositioning to the other side of the pond. Looks similar to LEYE but
    very small and delicate with very white face and underparts. Back gray
    with some black spots but not anywhere like the Yellowlegs. Bill needle
    like. Photos and digiscoped videos. I was able to help many folks get on
    this bird. It was still in the same area when I left it around 11:30am.
    "
    
    Just the messenger,
    
    Justyn Stahl
    
    San Clemente Island
  30. -back to top-


-revision history-
v1.30 - 01/05/16 - Revamped cloud logic, optimized database queries, linked to eBird rarities.
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v1.22 - 12/03/11 - Corrected GMT offsets on dates. Added last 5 posts at top.
v1.21 - 11/24/11 - Added direct link to range map for NA birds.
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 v1.0 - 11/21/11 - Initial version coded. Currently archiving 'lacobirds' and 'calbirds'.