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 Month/Year Breakdown (Top 15):

 Oct, 2006 - 12 e-mail(s)...
 Mar, 2002 - 11 e-mail(s)...
 Jan, 2007 - 6 e-mail(s)...
 , - 6 e-mail(s)...
 Sep, 2015 - 6 e-mail(s)...
 Sep, 2014 - 5 e-mail(s)...
 Sep, 2006 - 4 e-mail(s)...
 Aug, 2013 - 4 e-mail(s)...
 Sep, 2017 - 4 e-mail(s)...
 Sep, 2007 - 4 e-mail(s)...
 Sep, 2009 - 3 e-mail(s)...
 Sep, 2008 - 3 e-mail(s)...
 Feb, 2002 - 3 e-mail(s)...
 Sep, 2005 - 3 e-mail(s)...
 Dec, 2002 - 2 e-mail(s)...




   Manx Shearwater (Puffinus puffinus) - MASH (recent eBird sightings, view CBRC records, range map
)

  1. Upcoming pelagic trip out of Ventura on July 15 LINK
    DATE: Jul 3, 2018 @ 10:55am, 45 day(s) ago
     Hi All
    
    This is a reminder that Island Packers is offering a 12-hour
    deepwater pelagic trip from the Ventura Harbor at 7 am on Sunday July 15. This trip will allow us to get to offshore
    waters beyond the reach of most day trips where we will have a chance to see a
    number of outstanding pelagic birds and marine mammals. Our intention is to go southwest from Ventura
    towards San Nicolas Island and the banks, knolls, canyons and other productive
    features in the area. This will give us
    a chance to look for sought after species like Cooks Petrel, Red-billed
    Tropicbird, Least Storm-Petrel, Leach's Storm-Petrel, Townsend's Storm-Petrel,
    Guadalupe Murrelet and Craveri's Murrelet.
    Our trip to this area last year was outstanding and yielded Cooks
    Petrels, Black-footed Albatross, 45 Craveris Murrelets (!!), Brown Booby, and
    a variety of other pelagic species. Recent pelagic trips out of San Diego have
    found Craveris Murrelets, Nazca Booby, Masked Booby, and Townsends
    Storm-Petrel so there are some great birds in the Southern California Bight at
    the moment. We will decide what our offshore destination will be after
    reviewing oceanographic conditions at the time of the trip, which will help
    determine where the birds and other marine life may be present or concentrated.
    
    Summer trips in July and August coincide with the earlier
    parts of the southbound fall migration of arctic nesting species, the northward
    dispersal of southern nesting species, and the nesting and fledging periods of
    breeding species on the Channel Islands.
    Past trips have found Cooks Petrel (rare), Manx Shearwater (rare),
    Black-footed Albatross, Laysan Albatross (rare), Buller's Shearwater, Leach's
    Storm-Petrel, Blue-footed Booby, Brown Booby, Long-tailed Jaeger, South Polar
    Skua, Scripps's Murrelet, Craveri's Murrelet, Arctic Tern, and a variety of
    other shearwaters, storm-petrels, pelagic gulls and terns, phalaropes, and
    alcids. Patrolling the shoreline of
    Anacapa Island has yielded American Oystercatchers over the last few
    years. Summer is also an excellent time
    for Ashy and Black Storm-Petrels, and Cassin's Auklets. There is often a flock of 1000's of Black
    Storm-Petrels south of the islands that we will attempt to find. A few Rhinoceros Auklets and Common Murres
    should still be around, along with Pigeon Guillemots near the islands. Red-billed Tropicbird is always possible on
    summer trips, although not found every year.
    
    The trip will be on an ultra-fast catamaran that features a
    spacious and comfortable cabin, galley, and excellent viewing from both the
    upper and lower decks. A full contingent of outstanding seabird leaders will be
    present to make sure we see all that is out there. The Captain and crew know how to run birding
    trips and are enthusiastic and helpful.
    In addition, we work hard to creep up on birds and get them in the right
    light...photographers will not be disappointed!
    
    Trips can be booked over the phone by calling (805) 642-1393
    or online at www.IslandPackers.com by clicking the Reserve Trip tab, select the
    Special Trips tab, and select your desired departure. The cost of the trip is
    $195 per adult.
    
    Hope to see you at sea!
    
    Dave Pereksta
    Ventura, CA
  2. -back to top-
  3. May 20th San Diego Pelagic Trip report LINK
    DATE: May 27, 2018, 3 month(s) ago
    The full trip report for the May 20th San Diego pelagic birding trip is now up on our website, sandiegopelagics.com. Highlights included a distant Manx Shearwater, over 100 Scripps's Murrelets, a Black-footed Albatross, and a late Common Murre. It's not too late to sign-up for our next trip, which is on Sunday June 10th. Additional information about the trip can be found on our website. Reservation instructions are in the Reservations link in the menu bar at the top of the homepage.
    See you on the boat!
    Bruce Rideout and Dave Povey San Diego Pelagics Buena Vista Audubon 
  4. -back to top-
  5. JOUANIN'S PETREL: A FIRST RECORD FOR NORTH AMERICA LINK
    DATE: Apr 11, 2018 @ 9:05pm, 4 month(s) ago
    Howdy, CalBirders,
    
    JOUANIN’S PETREL: FIRST NORTH AMERICAN RECORD:
    
    Today I learned that the “mystery” petrel briefly observed and photographed during the Saturday, September 12, 2015 Shearwater Journeys’ offshore albacore trip has been accepted by the California Bird Records Committee as a JOUANIN’S PETREL ( Bulweria fallax ). This record represents the first accepted record of this north-west Indian Ocean seabird for North America.
    
    This was a sold out trip accompanied by leaders: Scott Terrill, Linda Terrill, Alex Rinkert, Mary Gustafson, Rick Fournier, and Debi Shearwater. In addition, Will Brooks (a leader) was on board as a “regular” along with his father, Jim Brooks. Expert seabirder, Fabio Olmos from Brazil was on board, along with many keen local and out-of-state seabirders: Cooper Scallan, Doug Koch, Bryan Hix, Paul Fenwick, Chris Hartzell, Hillary White, Peder Svingen, Peter Haines, and others. Our captain this day was John Klusmire whose experience with Debi dates back to the mid-1980’s.
    
    Ace leader, Alex Rinkert, first spotted the petrel and called it a “Bulwer’s Petrel” from the stern of the boat which was a pretty darned good call. As the petrel circled the vessel toward the bow, Scott Terrill and I had a view as it crossed to the other side. However, having seen quite a few Bulwer’s Petrels (including the first record for North America on another of our Monterey Bay trips some years ago), I was immediately convinced that this bird was not a Bulwer’s Petrel, based on size alone. The sighting was in Santa Cruz County, based on using “nearest point of land” and at a depth of only 200 fathoms. This species occurs in shallow waters within its normal range.
    
    It should be noted that an extremely warm water “river” occurred along the north coast, off Santa Cruz and Half Moon Bay during this period. The presence of warm water by itself was not so much a factor, as the fact that it smashed into a front of significantly cold water. It was this frontal zone that produced the food for seabirds. (It’s all about food.) Indeed, only 3 days later, we found a WHITE-CHINNED PETREL on our September 15, 2015 Half Moon Bay trip. That petrel flew in and sat on the water for 45 minutes— birders seemed to become bored with it!
    
    Much discussion ensued following the sighting of the September 12 petrel. Eventually, Scott Terrill and I put together all of the details we could muster— including many (not-so-great) photos which became known as “the petrel package.” This was circulated to some of the top world seabirders. David Ainley, Peter Harrison and Hadoram Shirihai responded independently and immediately that they judged the petrel to be a JOUANIN’S PETREL!
    
    Finally, the package went to the CBRC and they made a concurring diagnosis. Of course, any first record for North America requires a laborious vetting, but especially so with seabirds which often present the most fleeting of views.
    
    So, although we had a very good number of images, I would not particularly call any of them “great.” I will try to put up a post on my blog with some of these images. I will post about that when it becomes available.
    
    Subsequent to our first record, nine months later (June 2016) a petrel captured during mist netting at Santa Cruz Island (southern California) was identified as a Jouanin’s Petrel. It may or may not have been the same individual we saw in September 2015.
    
    Jouanin’s Petrel occurs widely offshore in the Arabian Sea and Gulfs of Aden and Oman, where it is the commonest pelagic seabird. It has showed up as a vagrant off Australia, Kenya, Seychelles, Saudi Arabia, and other places. BirdLife lists this species as Near Threatened. There are about 4 records for Hawaii.
    
    If you’d like to read an interesting and fun tale about Jouanin’s Petrels, I recommend this article by my friend, Bob Flood:
    http://www.rarebirdalert.co.uk/v2/Content/Scilly_Pelagics_Jouanins_Petrels.aspxs_id=746315633
    
    HISTORY OF OFFSHORE MONTEREY ALBACORE TRIPS:
    
    The “albacore, offshore Monterey” pelagic trip was invented by Debi Shearwater back in 1983. During the 1980’s albacore, a type of tuna, regularly occurred off Monterey Bay. Reports from fishermen of incredible seabird activity prompted me to begin offering these 12 hour trips. The purpose of this trip was to present a wholistic approach to enjoying marine life. To that end, we endeavored to search for key seabirds, including Craveri’s, Scripps’s, and Guadalupe Murrelets; blue and Baird’s Beaked whales; and to catch albacore, the “cadillac” of the tunas. We never dreamed these trips would turn out to produce so many incredible seabird records. Even though the albacore changed their migration pattern and rarely occur off Monterey nowadays, we continue to operate albacore trips. These trips always sell out in advance.
    
    Other rare, or very uncommon seabirds we have discovered on Shearwater Journeys’ past albacore trips have included: Laysan Albatross; Cook’s and Hawaiian Petrels; Streaked, Flesh-footed, Greater, and Manx Shearwaters; Least and Leach’s Storm-Petrels; Red-billed and Red-tailed Tropicbirds; Brown Booby; Craveri’s, Scripps’s, and Guadalupe Murrelets. This is a spectacular trip for jaegers, often encountering over 100 in one day! We almost always have a “grand slam” on Pomarine, Parasitic, and Long-tailed Jaegers, Long-tailed being the most commonly sighted. It is the single best trip to see South Polar Skua.
    
    Our September 9, 2017 Albacore trip indeed found all of the jaegers, South Polar Skua; Guadalupe, Scripps’s, and Craveri’s Murrelets, and many of the “regular” fall species. Northern Waterthrush and American Redstart were “bonus” birds.
    
    OUR UPCOMING ALBACORE: OFFSHORE MONTEREY TRIPS:
    SUN. SEP. 9
    SAT. SEP. 15
    
    See our complete schedule for 2018:
    http://www.shearwaterjourneys.com/schedule.html
    
    Past trip reports:
    Oct. 6, 2001 with STREAKED SHEARWATER and Black-throated Gray Warbler:
    http://www.shearwaterjourneys.com/ag011006.html
    Sep. 15, 2002 with 42 LONG-TAILED JAEGERS and murrelets:
    http://www.shearwaterjourneys.com/020913.html
    Sep. 10, 2006 with ten FLESH-FOOTED SHEARWATERS and 1500+ Buller’s Shearwaters:
    http://www.shearwaterjourneys.com/ag060910.htm
    Sep. 13, 2008 with 7000 ASHY STORM-PETRELS:
    http://shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com/2008/09/shearwater-birthday-birding-sep-13-2008.html
    Sep. 12, 2009 with 24 COOK’S PETRELS and one HAWAIIAN PETREL:
    http://shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com/2009/09/trip-report-sep-12-2009-monterey.html
    
    I gratefully thank all of the leaders and especially, the participants from near and far —representing 14 different states in the USA and Canada and Brazil. Without you , the participants, we have nothing. Special thanks to the many photographers on board who sent their images, and to the reviewers who worked on this amazing record.
    
    Now check that box!
    What’s next
    Still discovering first North American records after 40 years of trips!
    Debi Shearwater
    
    DEBRA SHEARWATER
    Shearwater Journeys, Inc.
    PO Box 190
    Hollister, CA 95024
    831.637.8527
    debi@...
    www.shearwaterjourneys.com
    www.shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com
    
    Celebrating 43 Years of Seabirding with Shearwater Journeys
  6. -back to top-
  7. JOUANIN'S PETREL: A FIRST RECORD FOR NORTH AMERICA LINK
    DATE: Apr 11, 2018 @ 9:04pm, 4 month(s) ago
    Howdy, CalBirders,
    
    JOUANIN’S PETREL: FIRST NORTH AMERICAN RECORD:
    
    Today I learned that the “mystery” petrel briefly observed and photographed during the Saturday, September 12, 2015 Shearwater Journeys’ offshore albacore trip has been accepted by the California Bird Records Committee as a JOUANIN’S PETREL ( Bulweria fallax ). This record represents the first accepted record of this north-west Indian Ocean seabird for North America.
    
    This was a sold out trip accompanied by leaders: Scott Terrill, Linda Terrill, Alex Rinkert, Mary Gustafson, Rick Fournier, and Debi Shearwater. In addition, Will Brooks (a leader) was on board as a “regular” along with his father, Jim Brooks. Expert seabirder, Fabio Olmos from Brazil was on board, along with many keen local and out-of-state seabirders: Cooper Scallan, Doug Koch, Bryan Hix, Paul Fenwick, Chris Hartzell, Hillary White, Peder Svingen, Peter Haines, and others. Our captain this day was John Klusmire whose experience with Debi dates back to the mid-1980’s.
    
    Ace leader, Alex Rinkert, first spotted the petrel and called it a “Bulwer’s Petrel” from the stern of the boat which was a pretty darned good call. As the petrel circled the vessel toward the bow, Scott Terrill and I had a view as it crossed to the other side. However, having seen quite a few Bulwer’s Petrels (including the first record for North America on another of our Monterey Bay trips some years ago), I was immediately convinced that this bird was not a Bulwer’s Petrel, based on size alone. The sighting was in Santa Cruz County, based on using “nearest point of land” and at a depth of only 200 fathoms. This species occurs in shallow waters within its normal range.
    
    It should be noted that an extremely warm water “river” occurred along the north coast, off Santa Cruz and Half Moon Bay during this period. The presence of warm water by itself was not so much a factor, as the fact that it smashed into a front of significantly cold water. It was this frontal zone that produced the food for seabirds. (It’s all about food.) Indeed, only 3 days later, we found a WHITE-CHINNED PETREL on our September 15, 2015 Half Moon Bay trip. That petrel flew in and sat on the water for 45 minutes— birders seemed to become bored with it!
    
    Much discussion ensued following the sighting of the September 12 petrel. Eventually, Scott Terrill and I put together all of the details we could muster— including many (not-so-great) photos which became known as “the petrel package.” This was circulated to some of the top world seabirders. David Ainley, Peter Harrison and Hadoram Shirihai responded independently and immediately that they judged the petrel to be a JOUANIN’S PETREL!
    
    Finally, the package went to the CBRC and they made a concurring diagnosis. Of course, any first record for North America requires a laborious vetting, but especially so with seabirds which often present the most fleeting of views.
    
    So, although we had a very good number of images, I would not particularly call any of them “great.” I will try to put up a post on my blog with some of these images. I will post about that when it becomes available.
    
    Subsequent to our first record, nine months later (June 2016) a petrel captured during mist netting at Santa Cruz Island (southern California) was identified as a Jouanin’s Petrel. It may or may not have been the same individual we saw in September 2015.
    
    Jouanin’s Petrel occurs widely offshore in the Arabian Sea and Gulfs of Aden and Oman, where it is the commonest pelagic seabird. It has showed up as a vagrant off Australia, Kenya, Seychelles, Saudi Arabia, and other places. BirdLife lists this species as Near Threatened. There are about 4 records for Hawaii.
    
    If you’d like to read an interesting and fun tale about Jouanin’s Petrels, I recommend this article by my friend, Bob Flood:
    http://www.rarebirdalert.co.uk/v2/Content/Scilly_Pelagics_Jouanins_Petrels.aspxs_id=746315633
    
    HISTORY OF OFFSHORE MONTEREY ALBACORE TRIPS:
    
    The “albacore, offshore Monterey” pelagic trip was invented by Debi Shearwater back in 1983. During the 1980’s albacore, a type of tuna, regularly occurred off Monterey Bay. Reports from fishermen of incredible seabird activity prompted me to begin offering these 12 hour trips. The purpose of this trip was to present a wholistic approach to enjoying marine life. To that end, we endeavored to search for key seabirds, including Craveri’s, Scripps’s, and Guadalupe Murrelets; blue and Baird’s Beaked whales; and to catch albacore, the “cadillac” of the tunas. We never dreamed these trips would turn out to produce so many incredible seabird records. Even though the albacore changed their migration pattern and rarely occur off Monterey nowadays, we continue to operate albacore trips. These trips always sell out in advance.
    
    Other rare, or very uncommon seabirds we have discovered on Shearwater Journeys’ past albacore trips have included: Laysan Albatross; Cook’s and Hawaiian Petrels; Streaked, Flesh-footed, Greater, and Manx Shearwaters; Least and Leach’s Storm-Petrels; Red-billed and Red-tailed Tropicbirds; Brown Booby; Craveri’s, Scripps’s, and Guadalupe Murrelets. This is a spectacular trip for jaegers, often encountering over 100 in one day! We almost always have a “grand slam” on Pomarine, Parasitic, and Long-tailed Jaegers, Long-tailed being the most commonly sighted. It is the single best trip to see South Polar Skua.
    
    Our September 9, 2017 Albacore trip indeed found all of the jaegers, South Polar Skua; Guadalupe, Scripps’s, and Craveri’s Murrelets, and many of the “regular” fall species. Northern Waterthrush and American Redstart were “bonus” birds.
    
    OUR UPCOMING ALBACORE: OFFSHORE MONTEREY TRIPS:
    SUN. SEP. 9
    SAT. SEP. 15
    
    See our complete schedule for 2018:
    http://www.shearwaterjourneys.com/schedule.html
    
    Past trip reports:
    Oct. 6, 2001 with STREAKED SHEARWATER and Black-throated Gray Warbler:
    http://www.shearwaterjourneys.com/ag011006.html
    Sep. 15, 2002 with 42 LONG-TAILED JAEGERS and murrelets:
    http://www.shearwaterjourneys.com/020913.html
    Sep. 10, 2006 with ten FLESH-FOOTED SHEARWATERS and 1500+ Buller’s Shearwaters:
    http://www.shearwaterjourneys.com/ag060910.htm
    Sep. 13, 2008 with 7000 ASHY STORM-PETRELS:
    http://shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com/2008/09/shearwater-birthday-birding-sep-13-2008.html
    Sep. 12, 2009 with 24 COOK’S PETRELS and one HAWAIIAN PETREL:
    http://shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com/2009/09/trip-report-sep-12-2009-monterey.html
    
    I gratefully thank all of the leaders and especially, the participants from near and far —representing 14 different states in the USA and Canada and Brazil. Without you , the participants, we have nothing. Special thanks to the many photographers on board who sent their images, and to the reviewers who worked on this amazing record.
    
    Now check that box!
    What’s next
    Still discovering first North American records after 40 years of trips!
    Debi Shearwater
    
    DEBRA SHEARWATER
    Shearwater Journeys, Inc.
    PO Box 190
    Hollister, CA 95024
    831.637.8527
    debi@...
    www.shearwaterjourneys.com
    www.shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com
    
    Celebrating 43 Years of Seabirding with Shearwater Journeys
  8. -back to top-
  9. The Pelagic Season Continues LINK
    DATE: Sep 20, 2017 @ 4:25pm, 11 month(s) ago
    Howdy, Birders,
    
    Shearwater Journeys had pelagic trips from Monterey on September 14 and Half Moon Bay on September 15 and 16th with some spectacular feeding frenzies, especially on September 15th.
    
    In total, for these three trips, we saw: 11species of tubenoses; all three jaegers and South polar skua; 6 species of alcids; and almost 300 whales (blue, fin, and humpback).
    
    Our upcoming trips from Monterey include:
    
    SEP 22 with Christian Schwarz, Hannah Nevins, Dave Pereksta, Clay Kempf, Debi Shearwater
    SEP 24 with Jim Holmes, Nick Levendosky, Alex Rinkert, Scott & Linda Terrill, Debi Shearwater
    SEP 30 with Alex Rinkert, Nick Levendosky, Scott & Linda Terrill, Clay Kempf
    OCT 8 with Alex Rinkert, Nick Levendosky, Clay Kempf, Scott & Linda Terrill
    
    Spaces are available on all trips. We meet at 7 a.m. and return about 3 p.m. For reservations email me: debi@...
    
    On September 15, upwards of 80 HUMPBACK WHALES, 500 California sea lions and PINK-FOOTED SHEARWATERS numbering close to 10,000 and about 350 BULLER’S SHEARWATERS were feeding on giant balls and walls of anchovies. It was a dizzying amount of marine life. Amongst all of the pandemonium, Peter Pyle spotted what he thought was a GREAT SHEARWATER. I saw this shearwater while it was still sitting on the water. Later, when Peter was reviewing his images, he found a MANX SHEARWATER in several images. We also spotted 1 WILSON’S, 2 FORK-TAILED, and 4 ASHY STORM-PETRELS. Also, offshore, we encountered BLACK-FOOTED ALBATROSS, NORTHERN FULMAR, RHINOCEROS AUKLETS, ALL THREE JAEGERS, and SOUTH POLAR SKUA, along with 175 PACIFIC WHITE-SIDED DOLPHINS, and 2 NORTHERN RIGHT WHALE DOLPINS. Over 100,000 SOOTY SHEARWATERS were feeding in the nearshore area. One MARBLED MURRELET was also near shore. A solitary TUFTED PUFFIN was sighted on the way home.
    
    Our trip on September 16th was similar, although many of the offshore flocks had moved on and both BLUE and FIN WHALES had moved in with the HUMPBACK WHALES. Seabirds were similar, except that many more CASSIN’S AUKLETS had moved into the area. Far offshore, a GREEN-TAILED TOWHEE circled the vessel (photographed). This represents a new addition to the over 100 species of non-pelagic birds I have seen on pelagic trips! Again, we saw all three species of jaegers. Nearshore, we encountered a dozen BOTTLENOSE DOLPHINS, many with calves.
    
    We do have upcoming trips, all with spaces available. Please see our web site: www.shearwaterjourneys.comfor more information.
    
    Living the Salt Life,
    Debi Shearwater
    
    DEBRA SHEARWATER
    Shearwater Journeys, Inc.
    PO Box 190
    Hollister, CA 95024
    831.637.8527
    debi@...
    www.shearwaterjourneys.com
    www.shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com
    
    Celebrating 42 Years of Seabirding with Shearwater Journeys
  10. -back to top-
  11. Morro Bay pelagic trip - 14 October LINK
    DATE: Sep 20, 2017 @ 3:33pm, 11 month(s) ago
    Birders -
    
    There are still spaces available for the Morro Coast Audubon October 14 boat trip out of Morro Bay. Weather permitting, our goal will be to reach the Santa Lucia Bank.  It is crunch time for this trip in that if we do not get enough participants to sign up in the next few days we may need to cancel or risk losing our deposit.  Please email Mike Stiles at < mstiles@... > if you are interesting in going. Or if you have already contacted Mike, please mail back your information and check.
    The cost is $122 for an 8-hour trip out of Morro Bay, which is a pretty good value relative to most trips offshore. Species that we can expect on this trip are Pink-footed and Buller’s Shearwaters, Black-vented and Sooty Shearwaters, Parasitic and Pomarine Jaegers, Red and Red-necked Phalaropes, Cassin’s and Rhinoceros Auklets, Common Murre, and Sabine’s Gull. Also a good possibility are both South Polar Skua and Flesh-footed Shearwater, and with luck, we may see Black-footed Albatross, Manx Shearwater, Ashy Storm-Petrel, Tufted Puffin, or even a Great Shearwater or something else totally unexpected.
    There are not many opportunities to take a fall pelagic trip off San Luis Obispo County, especially during October, so for those out there hoping for San Luis Obispo County birds, this trip will provide a good chance for new county birds. This trip is closer is comparatively inexpensive and we still have the ability to attract birds by chumming! Master chummer West Fritz will be attracting birds to the boat and one of the leaders . The other leaders will be Curtis Marantz, Peter Geade, and Tom Edell.
    Again, if you are interested, please email Mike Stiles at < mstiles@... > today !
    
    Tom Edell Cayucos, CA
  12. -back to top-
  13. Monterey Seabirds-Trip Report 9/5 LINK
    DATE: Sep 8, 2017 @ 4:37pm, 11 month(s) ago
    All,   Monterey Seabirds went out on Tuesday for an 8 hour pelagic.  We were lucky enough to catch the seabird spectacle previously reported by others on eBird and these lists.
      SOOTY SHEARWATERS were racing into the bay by the tens of thousands as we started our trip.  Sorting through them was a blast and we found numerous PINK-FOOTED and BLACK-VENTED SHEARWATERS mixed throughout.  A real thrill was a MANX SHEARWATER that we spotted sitting on the water off of Point Pinos.  It sat long enough for folks to get some photos.  Several of us on the boat had encountered Manx shearwater before, but were delighted in getting our first decent photos!
      This trip stayed in Monterey County waters, where RHINOCEROS AUKLETS seemed to have really increased lately. CASSIN'S AUKLETS were a bit more scarce on this trip, but we found a few.
      In the northern region of the county, and fairly far offshore, we encountered another real treat-BLUE WHALES and there were gobs of them.  Some offered great looks close to the boat while others fed farther away.  It's difficult to count these whales, as they can stay down in a dive for a while, but our whale experts on board guessed about 20 Blues were in the immediate vicinity. One FIN WHALE also made a brief pass through the group. 
      When we encountered this group Blue Whales, we also found our first ASHY STORM-PETRELS.  Leading to even more excitement on board, a single BLACK STORM-PETREL flew through the area. 
      RISSO'S DOLPHINS, bow-riding PACIFIC WHITE-SIDED DOLPHIN and breaching HUMPBACK WHALES also fed in these impressively productive waters.
      Also enjoyed by all were BLACK-FOOTED ALBATROSS, RED and RED-NECKED PHALAROPE, and both PARASITIC and POMARINE JAEGERS to name a few.
        MONTEREY SEABIRDS' next trip is SUNDAY Sept. 10 though it only has a couple spots left.  Our Monday Sept. 11 trip is a 12 hour trip where we hope to spend more time in deeper water.  There is space available on that trip.  
      See our complete list of trips at montereyseabirds.com or call (831) 375-4658 to make a reservation.  
      The season has had a fantastic start.  We hope to see you out on the bay soon.
    
    Good Birding,
    
    Mark Kudrav
    Monterey Seabirds
    Pacific Grove 
  14. -back to top-
  15. Point Pinos MANX SHEARWATER 9/2 and Pelagic Opportunity Tuesday LINK
    DATE: Sep 2, 2017 @ 5:21pm, 12 month(s) ago
    All,   Today I headed to Point Pinos for a seawatch at 2:10pm.  Seemed like as good a way as any to beat the heat.
      Conditions were fantastic as soon as I arrived.  Not much wind to speak of, but there were plenty of feeding seabirds just beyond the rocks.  Sorting through thousands of SOOTY SHEARWATERS, I picked out a single NORTHERN FULMAR as well as a MANX SHEARWATER within ten minutes of arriving.  This is the second MANX in several days from a seawatch at the Point. If you don't follow eBird closely, Blake Matheson had one on 8/29. I added a POMARINE JAEGER and one PINK-FOOTED SHEARWATER a bit later.
      Also at Point Pinos, but behind the maintenance yard were three LARK SPARROWS and a KINGBIRD Spp. that I thought was probably a Western but only got a very brief look.
    
     If you'd like to get offshore, MONTEREY SEABIRDS is headed out on Tuesday Sept. 5 for an 8-hour pelagic trip.  As always we'll be leaving from Monterey at 7:30 am.  You can register by calling (831) 375-4658 or got to montereyseabirds.com  where you can see all or our other upcoming dates. 
    Hope to see you on a boat or at the point sometime.
    
    Mark Kudrav
    Monterey Seabirds
    Pacific Grove, CA
  16. -back to top-
  17. Leach's Storm-Petrels in Monterey Bay--16 December LINK
    DATE: Dec 16, 2016 @ 9:32pm, 2 year(s) ago
    Hi All,
    
    Today was a great day at the Pt. Pinos Seawatch. The official count ended yesterday, but the weather conspired to draw Skye Haas and company in for an extra day. A moderate NW wind and some rain overnight dumped a bunch of Leach's Storm-Petrels in the bay today. We had birds in view most of the day, trickling west past the point. I was able to photography probably 20 individuals, and got pretty good video of a few. Will post that when I get time to download the images and process them this weekend. Also of note today was an adult female Brown Booby, different from the sub-adult seen yesterday here in the bay. A good early AM push of loons and a good late season scoter flight made the day a pleasure. Seawatch totals below from today:
    
    35 Brant (Black)
    20 Mallard
    2390 Surf Scoter
    1 White-winged Scoter
    3 Black Scoter
    17 Red-breasted Merganser
    54 Red-throated Loon
    9269 Pacific Loon
    17 Common Loon
    1 Horned Grebe
    1 Red-necked Grebe
    1 Eared Grebe
    1 Black-footed Albatross
    359 Northern Fulmar
    3 Pink-footed Shearwater
    12 Sooty Shearwater
    15 Short-tailed Shearwater
    32 Sooty/Short-tailed Shearwater
    1 Manx Shearwater
    1578 Black-vented Shearwater
    46 Leach's Storm-Petrel (Leach's)
    1 Brown Booby
    640 Brandt's Cormorant
    103 Pelagic Cormorant
    18 Double-crested Cormorant
    1110 Brown Pelican
    3 Great Egret
    12 Black Oystercatcher
    5 Whimbrel (Hudsonian)
    13 Black Turnstone
    8 Sanderling
    5 Red Phalarope
    8 Pomarine Jaeger
    1 Pomarine/Parasitic Jaeger
    1488 Common Murre
    2 Marbled Murrelet
    2 Ancient Murrelet
    151 Rhinoceros Auklet
    1 alcid sp.
    7 Black-legged Kittiwake
    20 Bonaparte's Gull
    1800 Heermann's Gull
    36 Mew Gull (American)
    2100 Western Gull
    2750 California Gull
    6 Herring Gull
    10 Thayer's Gull
    57 Glaucous-winged Gull
    8 Western x Glaucous-winged Gull (hybrid)
    
    --
    ===========
    Brian L. Sullivan
    
    eBird Project Leader
    www.ebird.org
    
    Photo Editor
    Birds of North America Online
    http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/BNA
    -------------------------------
  18. -back to top-
  19. San Pedro Pelagic This Saturday LINK
    DATE: Jun 29, 2016, 2 year(s) ago
    Hi all.
    The Catalina Explorer (formerly the Magician) is offering an eight-hour pelagic birding trip this Saturday. We will leave at 8 a.m. out of 22nd Street Landing in San Pedro. Cost is $110 per person; breakfast, lunch and a bottomless soda cup are included (and they have been known to serve brownies hot out of the oven a la mode).
    
    We will likely head to the four oil rigs halfway between Huntington Beach and the east end of Catalina Island (where the brown boobies have been roosting for the past couple of years); then follow the 100 fathom escarpment west around the Palos Verdes Peninsula to the mouth of the Redondo Canyon. That covers a lot of prime habitat.
    
    Waters temperatures are still above normal, and bird abundance and diversity offshore are low. Having said that, it is during unusual conditions that we are most likely to see unusual birds. We seem to be having a mini Magnificent Frigatebird invasion; a Manx Shearwater was seen in Orange County a couple of weeks ago, and a recent trip out of San Diego had good numbers of Craveri's Murrelets. And the cetacean show is really good right now, local boats are seeing Blue, Fin and Humpback Whales on a daily basis.
    
    To book, go to the Catalina Explorer website, http://catalinaexplorer.com/calendar.htm .
    
    Hope you can join us!
    
    Bernardo
    
    Bernardo Alps
    www.photocetus.com
    Whalephoto@...
    310.597.0449
    P.O. Box 1667
    San Pedro, CA 90733
  20. -back to top-
  21. Upcoming pelagic trips from Ventura with Island Packers LINK
    DATE: Apr 16, 2016 @ 9:30am, 2 year(s) ago
    Hello birders
    
    Island
    Packers has scheduled three pelagic birdingtrips for this summer and
    fall based out of Ventura and Oxnard, CA. The dates areJuly 10, August 21, and
    October 8. Summer and fall are great seasons to get offshore southern
    California and past trips have had success finding a variety of local,
    uncommon, and rare species.
    
    Summer
    trips in July and August
    coincide with the earlier parts of the southbound fall migration of
    arctic nesting species, the northward dispersal of southern nesting
    species, and the nesting and fledging periods of breeding species on the
    Channel Islands.Summer trips have found Manx Shearwater (rare),
    Black-footed Albatross, Laysan Albatross (rare), Buller's Shearwater,
    Leach's Storm-Petrel,
    Blue-footed Booby, Brown Booby, Long-tailed
    Jaeger, South Polar Skua, Scripps's Murrelet, Craveri's Murrelet (warm
    water years), Arctic Tern, and a variety of other shearwaters,
    storm-petrels, pelagic gulls and terns, phalaropes, and alcids.
    Patrolling the shoreline of Anacapa Island has yielded American
    Oystercatchers over the last few years. Summer is also an excellent
    time for Ashy and Black Storm-Petrels, and Cassin's Auklets. There is
    often a flock of 1000's of Black Storm-Petrels south of the islands
    that we will attempt to find. A few Rhinoceros Auklets should still be
    around, along with Pigeon Guillemots near the islands. Red-billed
    Tropicbird is always possible on summer trips, although not found every
    year.With the lingering El Nino this year, it will be a great time to
    look for warm water species including Guadalupe Murrelet, Craveri's
    Murrelet,and Least Storm-Petrel. In addition, the August trip will
    include a landing on Santa Cruz Island so we can search for the endemic
    Island Scrub-Jay!
    
    The waters around the northern
    Channel Islands can be very productive during the fall when hundreds
    (sometimes thousands) of shearwaters crowd into the inter-island gaps.
    In October, we will be looking through flocks of Black-vented,
    Pink-footed and Sooty Shearwaters for Buller's, Flesh-footed (uncommon),
    and Manx (rare) Shearwaters. This is peak season for seabird diversity
    so in addition to the species already mentioned, Black-footed Albatross,
    Black and Ashy Storm-Petrels, Cassin's and Rhinoceros Auklets, and
    Pomarine and Long-tailed Jaegers are all possible. It is a good time of
    year for South Polar Skua, Sabine's Gull, and Arctic Tern. Recent trips
    near the islands have found Blue-footed Booby (2013-2014, 2016) and Brown
    Booby (2013-2016)! There is also a potential for sought-after species
    like Red-billed Tropicbird, Least Storm-Petrel, Guadalupe Murrelet, and
    Craveri's Murrelet. The last two years were exceptional years for Craveri's
    Murrelet off southern California and with warm water continuing, our chances to find this elusive species may be good. We
    will decide what our offshore destinations will be after reviewing
    oceanographic conditions at the time of the trip, which will help
    determine where birds and other marine life may be present and/or
    concentrated.
    
    The schedule and pricing is as follows:
    Channel Islands and Beyond: Santa Barbara Channel, Interisland gaps, and deep waters south of the islands
    July 10th (Sunday)
    12 hrs 7 am-7 pm
    $195 per adult
    Previous
    year highlights include: Blue-footed Booby, Scripps’s and Craveri’s
    Murrelet, South Polar Skua, Common Tern, Leach’s, Ashy, and Black
    Storm-Petrels, Sooty, Pink-footed, and Black-vented Shearwaters,
    Cassin’s Auklet, and Red-necked Phalaropes. Manx Shearwater has also
    been sighted the past few years in mid-July.
    
    Anacapa and Santa Cruz Islands and the Island Scrub-Jay. This trip will be on the Vanguard out of the Channel Islands Harbor.
    August 21st (Sunday)
    9 hrs 8 am- 5 pm
    $80 per adult (This trip will drop off at Santa Cruz Island so we can search for the endemic Island Scrub-Jay)
    Previous
    year highlights include: Red-billed Tropicbird, Brown Booby, Scripps’s
    and Craveri’s Murrelets; Black-vented, Sooty, and Pink-footed
    Shearwaters; Cassin’s Auklet; Red-necked Phalarope; and Black
    Storm-Petrel.
    
    Fall Migration Adventure
    October 8th (Sat)
    10 hrs 8 am-6 pm
    $170 per adult
    Previous
    year highlights include: Blue-footed and Brown Booby; Black, Ashy, and Least Storm-Petrels; American
    Oystercatcher; Craveri’s Murrelet; Pomarine, Parasitic, and Long-tailed
    Jaegers; Cassin’s and Rhinoceros Auklets; Red and Red-necked Phalarope;
    Pink-footed and Black-vented Shearwaters, Sabine's Gulls, Common/Arctic Terns and Common
    Murre. Other possibilities include Buller’s and Flesh-footed
    Shearwaters, Wilson’s Storm Petrel, and Red-billed Tropicbird.
    
    The July and October trips will be on ultra-fast catamarans that feature
    spacious and comfortable cabins, galleys, and excellent viewing from
    both the upper and lower decks. A full contingent of outstanding seabird
    leaders will be present to make sure we see all that is out there. The
    Captains and crews know how to run birding trips and are enthusiastic
    and helpful.In addition, we work hard to creep up on birds and get
    them in the right light...photographers will not be disappointed!
    Trips can be booked over the phone by calling (805) 642-1393 or online at www.IslandPackers.comby clicking the Reserve Trip tab, Select the Special Trips tab, and select your desired departure.
    
    Hope to see you at sea!
    
    Dave Pereksta
    Ventura, CA
  22. -back to top-
  23. new photos online LINK
    DATE: Mar 14, 2016 @ 5:03pm, 2 year(s) ago
    I placed a bunch of new photos on my Recent Photos Gallery on my website including Kelp Gull, some Arizona birds and a bunch of CA birds such as Manx Shearwater off San Diego.
    
    www.sterlingbirds.com
    
    enjoy!
    John
    
    John Sterling
    VVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVV
    
    26 Palm Ave
    Woodland, CA 95695
    530 908-3836
    jsterling@...
    www.sterlingbirds.com
  24. -back to top-
  25. MAS Seawatch Report LINK
    DATE: Nov 17, 2015 @ 9:58am, 3 year(s) ago
    The MAS Seawatch Program now enters its third week. In our first two weeks under Tony Leukering's leadership, we have recorded 94,063 individual seabirds. Thus far our more numerous species of interest have totaled: SURF SCOTER (27,192); CASSIN'S AUKLET (9,193); BONAPARTE'S GULL (1,484); COMMON MURRE (2,525); HEERMAN'S GULL (5,325); BLACK-VENTED SHEARWATER (24,804); ELEGANT TERN (1,359) and BROWN PELICAN (4,376).
    
    PACIFIC LOON, perhaps the major focus of the effort, now totals 8,283. Notably the week over week daily increase from Nov. 7 (69) to Nov. 14 (3221) was 4600% and confirms we are entering the heart of that migration.
    
    Interesting scarce species have included BLACK SCOTER (10), LONG-TAILED DUCK (1), MANX SHEARWATER (3), SHORT-TAILED SHEARWATER (6), CACKLING GOOSE (106), GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE (3).
    
    Rarities of consequence have included: BROWN BOOBY, ROYAL TERN (2) and GUADALUPE MURRELET.
    
    Come see us at the Point!
    
    Blake Matheson
    President, Monterey Audubon
  26. -back to top-
  27. MAS Seawatch Program: Week 1 LINK
    DATE: Nov 10, 2015 @ 11:55am, 3 year(s) ago
    Greetings Birders
    
    Monterey Audubon launched its groundbreaking seawatch initiative on November 1. The effort, comprised of round-the-clock observation of migratory seabirds from Point Pinos is the first systematic and formal program of its kind. Our goal is to help expand our understanding of birds in the California Current and on Monterey Bay.
    
    The count effort is lead by Tony Leukering who has been present from dawn to dusk daily with sporadic help from local birders. In just one week the number of birds noted has been eye-opening even for locals who observe at "the Point" regularly. 20,120 SURF SCOTERS, 21,591 BLACK-VENTED SHEARWATERS and 8388 CASSIN'S AUKLET have been tallied thus far, suggesting the count will offer important insights into the population status and movements of these species.
    
    Interesting rarities noted have included BROWN BOOBY, GUADALUPE MURRELET, (7) BLACK SCOTER, (2) LONG-TAILED DUCK, and MANX SHEARWATER. I will update folks weekly as we progress. To follow the action checkout the Pt. Pinos Hotspot on eBird.
    
    ​Good birding,​
    
    Blake Matheson
    Board President, MAS
  28. -back to top-
  29. RE: [CALBIRDS] SEP 27 MONTEREY PELAGIC REPORT LINK
    DATE: Sep 29, 2015 @ 9:11pm, 3 year(s) ago
    Debi,
    Hey, are there any photos of the Least Storm-Petrels anywhere, just curious
    Thanks,
    Alvaro
    
    Alvaro Jaramillo
    alvaro@...
    www.alvarosadventures.com
    
    From: CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of DEBRA SHEARWATER debi@... [CALBIRDS]Sent: Monday, September 28, 2015 8:26 PMTo: Calbirds <CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com>Cc: countybirders@yahoogroups.comSubject: [CALBIRDS] SEP 27 MONTEREY PELAGIC REPORT
    
    Howdy, CAL Birders,
    
    Shearwater Journeys' September 27, 2015 Monterey Bay pelagic trip tallied 14 species of tubenoses. Highlights included: excellent views of two different MANX SHEARWATERS, sitting on the water amidst 5220 BLACK-VENTED SHEARWATERS. Other shearwaters included: FLESH-FOOTED, SOOTY, BULLER'S, SHORT-TAILED. Owing to the calmer seas on this trip, we found rafts of storm-petrels sitting on the water. Flocks ranged from 20 to 50 to 500 storm-petrels and included FIVE SPECIES: BLACK, ASHY, LEAST, WILSON'S, and FORK-TAILED. In all, we tallied 14 species of tubenoses and enjoyed a beautiful day at sea. We covered both Monterey and Santa Cruz Counties.
    
    Many thanks to all of the birders who joined us from near and far for this trip. The leaders on this date were: Nick Levendosky, Alex Rinkert, Joel Barrett, Linda Terrill, Scott Terrill, and Debi Shearwater.
    
    We operated 15 pelagic trips during 23 days of September from Monterey, Half Moon Bay, and Bodega Bay. It was quite amazing to be out there so many days and see how the species changed with the ebb and flow of warm water. Terrafin is showing a broad wall of warm water out about the 1000 fathom line (beyond the reach of one day trips). However, seabirds and other marine animals have been moving in ahead of this front. (Black-vented Shearwaters, Least Storm-Petrels, Loggerhead Turtle, Bonito). At this time the strongest and coldest water is nearshore, just off the Seal Beach along Highway One (Big Sur) where birders are reporting large concentrations of Sooty Shearwaters — this is absolutely right on the mark!
    
    During October, we have five trips scheduled. Of those, two are sold out. Spaces are still available on the following:
    
    OCTOBER 3 Monterey with leaders: Scott Terrill, Linda Terrill, Abe Borker, Dena Spatz, Tim Miller, Alex Rinkert. Jennifer Green, Debi Shearwater.
    
    OCTOBER 10 Monterey with leaders: David Vander Pluym, Lauren Harter, Todd McGrath, Alex Rinkert, Jennifer Green, Debi Shearwater.
    
    OCTOBER 11 Half Moon Bay with leaders: Jim Holmes, Tim Miller, Will Brooks, David Vander Pluym, Lauren Harter, Todd McGrath, Marissa Ortega-Welch, Debi Shearwater
    
    October 4 Half Moon Bay and October 18 Great White Shark trips are sold out. Wait list only.
    
    The complete species list follows below.
    
    PACIFIC LOON- 1
    
    EARED GREBE- 14
    
    BLACK-FOOTED ALBATROSS- 15
    
    PACIFIC FULMAR- 36
    
    PINK-FOOTED SHEARWATER- 90
    
    FLESH-FOOTED SHEARWATER- 1
    
    BULLER'S SHEARWATER- 4
    
    SOOTY SHEARWATER- 4615
    
    SHORT-TAILED SHEARWATER- 1
    
    MANX SHEARWATER- 2
    
    BLACK-VENTED SHEARWATER- 5220
    
    WILSON'S STORM-PETREL- 2
    
    FORK-TAILED STORM-PETREL- 2
    
    ASHY STORM-PETREL- 536
    
    BLACK STORM-PETREL- 83
    
    LEAST STORM-PETREL- 3
    
    BROWN PELICAN- 40
    
    BRANDT'S CORMORANT- 40
    
    DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT- 1
    
    PELAGIC CORMORANT- 4
    
    BLACK TURNSTONE- 2
    
    SURFBIRD- 3
    
    RED-NECKED PHALAROPE- 58
    
    RED PHALAROPE- 18
    
    POMARINE JAEGER- 9
    
    PARASITIC JAEGER- 4
    
    HEERMANN'S GULL- 50
    
    CALIFORNIA GULL- 310
    
    WESTERN GULL- 410
    
    SABINE'S GULL- 3
    
    ELEGANT TERN- 55
    
    COMMON TERN- 1
    
    COMMON MURRE- 55
    
    CASSIN'S AUKLET- 83
    
    RHINOCEROS AUKLET- 20
    
    PEREGRINE FALCON- 1, on the red and white radio tower along Cannery Row
    
    SEA OTTER- 5
    
    CALIFORNIA SEA LION- 5-
    
    STELLER'S SEA LION- 1
    
    NORTHERN ELEPHANT SEAL- 1
    
    HARBOR SEAL- 5
    
    HUMPBACK WHALE- 5
    
    SHORT-BEAKED COMMON DOLPHIN- 20
    
    LONG-BEAKED COMMON DOLPHIN- 800
    
    OCEAN SUNFISH- 2
    
    The turtle we saw on the September 25, 2015 Monterey Bay trip has been positively identified from images as a LOGGERHEAD TURTLE. Input was given by Robert L. Pitman on the ID. I have never seen a Loggerhead Turtle this far north, although they are known to range as far north as Alaska.
    
    Living the Salt Life,
    
    Debi Shearwater
    
    DEBRA SHEARWATER
    
    Shearwater Journeys, Inc.
    
    PO Box 190
    
    Hollister, CA 95024
    
    831.637.8527
    
    debi@...
    
    www.shearwaterjourneys.com
    
    www.shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com
    
    Celebrating 40 Years of Seabirding with Shearwater Journeys
    
    
  30. -back to top-


-revision history-
v1.30 - 01/05/16 - Revamped cloud logic, optimized database queries, linked to eBird rarities.
v1.23 - 12/08/11 - Added direct link to CBRC records.
v1.22 - 12/03/11 - Corrected GMT offsets on dates. Added last 5 posts at top.
v1.21 - 11/24/11 - Added direct link to range map for NA birds.
v1.2  - 11/23/11 - Greatly improved graphing technology - separates month vs. year by posts. Added species auto-complete functionality.
v1.14 - 11/22/11 - Added cloud bubble for common thread topics.
v1.13 - 11/22/11 - Added integrated photos where available.
v1.12 - 11/22/11 - Added multiple input boxes for additional refinement, negative search criteria (eg. -keyword).
v1.11 - 11/22/11 - Added banding code, species look-up. Also direct link to recent eBird observations.
 v1.1 - 11/22/11 - Added 'date' functionality. Shows top 'month/year' combinations for a query. Restrict results to that 'month/year'.
 v1.0 - 11/21/11 - Initial version coded. Currently archiving 'lacobirds' and 'calbirds'.