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 Month/Year Breakdown (Top 15):

 May, 2004 - 7 e-mail(s)...
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 Apr, 2006 - 6 e-mail(s)...
 Jun, 2004 - 5 e-mail(s)...
 Apr, 2005 - 5 e-mail(s)...
 , - 4 e-mail(s)...
 Apr, 2004 - 4 e-mail(s)...
 Dec, 2015 - 3 e-mail(s)...
 Mar, 2018 - 3 e-mail(s)...
 Jun, 2002 - 3 e-mail(s)...
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 Apr, 2003 - 3 e-mail(s)...
 May, 2003 - 3 e-mail(s)...
 Jun, 2005 - 2 e-mail(s)...
 May, 2006 - 2 e-mail(s)...



   Hooded Oriole
Hooded Oriole
Icterus cucullatus


   Hooded Oriole (Icterus cucullatus) - HOOR (recent eBird sightings, view CBRC records, range map
)

  1. RE: [CALBIRDS] Eider a steller bird or a joke? LINK
    DATE: Mar 12, 2018 @ 7:09am, 4 month(s) ago
    Birders,
    
    Thanks to Rob, Elias, Alan, and Jeff for their clarifications (either in the list serve or in private replies).Since I started this rant, I just wanted to emphasize that I was not at all trying to cast birders inCalifornia's great Northwest in a negative
    light -- obviously the talent up there is phenomenal, and they must deal with weather issues that we never see down here in the south. I was simply trying to understand why there was no public word about this mega-rarity, especially in light of ongoing discussions
    about the relevance of a statewide list serve.
    
    I would suggest that Calbirds is still a critical link in the communications chain about statewide rarities (a fourth state record certainly qualifies, even if yet another central coast/Bay Area Harlequin Duck or a twelfth-of-spring Hooded Oriole might not).
    Further, I would suggest that, with a bird this rare, getting word out about a "probable" (and I agree the brief eBird descriptions sound promising, and the observers are excellent) hasmany advantages and few drawbacks.
    
    Kimball
    
    Kimball L. Garrett Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County 900 Exposition Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90007 USA (213) 763-3368 kgarrett@...
    
    
     From: Rob Fowler [migratoriusfwlr@...]
    
    Sent: Sunday, March 11, 2018 9:15 PM
    
    To: CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com
    
    Subject: Re: [CALBIRDS] Eider a steller bird or a joke
    
    Hi all,
    As far as I can tell there probably is a Steller’s Eider here in Humboldt County. Many parties have tried to see this bird so far and weather and ocean conditions have confounded most parties except for a party of four that reportedly saw the bird yesterday
    afternoon, despite birders looking in the morning, too.
    
    Jeff Allen first noted this possible sighting to a couple of us on Wednesday but wasn’t comfortable with calling it 100%, despite having previous experience with this species in Alaska. Jeff briefly saw the bird again on Friday and thought it was probably
    the same bird and became more confident about the bird after looking at some photos online of the recent Oregon female Steller’s. I then decided to let birders know on our back channel Humboldt birders Facebook chat about this possibility yesterday morning
    but held off posting it publicly because Jeff was still not 100% on it (but overall felt pretty good about it). A couple of parties tried yesterday and only one party reportedly saw the bird in the afternoon. I think they probably did see the bird but I think
    that people might understand that we do want more locals to also see it and 100% confirm it despite the decent details that were included in the eBird report that got posted on the eBird alerts. I hope the observers don’t take this as a slight in their abilities
    because it is certainly not meant to be.
    
    It is worth noting that Jeff Allen discovered last years Common Pochard, discovered a female King Eider north of Redwood Creek in 2014, and has found many other notable birds.
    
    So as it stands right now there is probably a female Steller’s Eider with scoters north of the Redwood Creek mouth here in Humboldt County but as of yet few have gotten eyes on it due to mostly to weather and ocean conditions at this location. It can be
    a tough spot to get good looks at many of the birds and today the fog rolled in for most of the day and hampered viewing for most of it.
    
    We will promptly report the sighting more widely with more details once we got this bird 100% firmed up...if we do.
    
    Some of us will be looking for this bird tomorrow before rain comes in for most of the upcoming week.
    
    Also, it is worth noting that I and others are easily reachable via the various modern methods of communication and could have been asked directly about this.
    
    Stay tuned,
    
    Rob Fowler
    McKinleyville, CA
    
    ---------- Forwarded message ----------
    
    From: Jim Lomax
    sdrib@... [CALBIRDS] < CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com >
    
    Date: Sun, Mar 11, 2018 at 7:11 PM
    
    Subject: Re: [CALBIRDS] Eider a steller bird or a joke
    
    To: CALBIRDS < CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com >
    
     I, along with others I talked to, determined from the deafening silence that the report was bogus.
    
    Jim
    
    On Mar 11, 2018, at 5:47 PM, Kimball Garrett
    kgarrett@... [CALBIRDS] < CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com > wrote:
    
    Birders,
    
    
    I am assuming that since a bird representing a fourth California record, and the first record in over 26 years (which is greater than the birding lifetime of most current California birders) has not
    merited even a single posting to this statewide list serve or to the local (NWCalbirds) list serve,either (1) the sighting is well-known to be bogus and has been summarily dismissed by Humboldt birders), or (2) list serves have now officially and completely
    outlived any function in disseminating news of rare birds. Could somebody closer to the scene please enlighten the rest of us birders on the status of the reported female Steller's Eider at the mouth of Redwood Creek, Humboldt Co.on 10 March
    
    
    Kimball L. Garrett Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County 900 Exposition Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90007
    USA (213) 763-3368 kgarrett@...
    
    --
    Rob Fowler
    
    McKinleyville, CA
    
    www.fowleropebirding.com
  2. -back to top-
  3. RE: [CALBIRDS] FOS Hooded Orioles !!! LINK
    DATE: Mar 4, 2018 @ 11:20am, 5 month(s) ago
    Paul
    
    Any ideas if our “Alta California” Hooded Orioles winter in the Baja Peninsula, or do they go to the “mainland” of Mexico Or perhaps a bit of both. I assume it is not a bird that has been banded in numbers, so it may be impossible to know, and with resident birds in Baja even more difficult to be certain. But any fun conjecture would be welcome from those who visit Baja a lot.
    
    Alvaro
    
    Alvaro Jaramillo
    
    alvaro@...
    
    www.alvarosadventures.com
    
    From: CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com < CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com > On Behalf Of Paul Lehman lehman.paul@... [CALBIRDS]
    
    Sent: Sunday, March 4, 2018 10:04 AM
    
    To: CALBIRDS < CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com >
    
    Subject: [CALBIRDS] FOS Hooded Orioles !!!
    
    I am hereby pleased to announce, with much trepidation, the season's
    
    first "FOS Hooded Oriole" posting. Several adult males today, 04 March,
    
    in San Diego. Only another 10,578 similar posts to go between now and
    
    June...or July.... or next September :-D :-). Actually, these arriving
    
    birds are almost a week late compared to the average over the past 5+
    
    years, perhaps a result of the recent cool and unsettled weather.
    
    Obviously this does not include over-wintering birds, which are largely
    
    female/immature male types and which continued until very recently.
    
    --Paul Lehman, San Diego
    
    
  4. -back to top-
  5. FOS Hooded Orioles !!! LINK
    DATE: Mar 4, 2018 @ 10:03am, 5 month(s) ago
    I am hereby pleased to announce, with much trepidation, the season's
    
    first "FOS Hooded Oriole" posting. Several adult males today, 04 March,
    
    in San Diego.  Only another 10,578 similar posts to go between now and
    
    June...or July.... or next September :-D :-).  Actually, these arriving
    
    birds are almost a week late compared to the average over the past 5+
    
    years, perhaps a result of the recent cool and unsettled weather.
    
    Obviously this does not include over-wintering birds, which are largely
    
    female/immature male types and which continued until very recently.
    
    --Paul Lehman,  San Diego
  6. -back to top-
  7. Siskiyou and Trinity Counties LINK
    DATE: May 12, 2017 @ 4:01pm, 1 year(s) ago
    CB’ers, Sharon & I took a trip to far NorCal, starting on the 7 th
    & ending yesterday (11 th ).
    Actually, the goal of the trip was to scout out a viewing location for
    the August total solar eclipse in central Oregon, but we took the opportunity
    of being in Siskiyou and Trinity Counties to see if we could add some birds. Siskiyou County,
    05/08/17 Grass Lake, on SR-97, was full of water, as expected. The past several years it has been dry or
    nearly so. With the abundant water, we
    were hoping for BLACK TERN, which Bruce Mast got here on 05/30/16 (despite the
    low water level), and Jim Greaves got on 06/09/07. No luck.
    Perhaps we were a couple of weeks early.
    At the Rest Stop here, we did get a couple of singing Purple Finches
    (both female), and a Pygmy Nuthatch.
    Near Macdoel, along SR-97, we had a Rough-legged Hawk & a Swainson’s
    Hawk. With 250 miles still to go to get to Madras, OR, we took only
    a short time to bird along SR-161 (a.k.a. Stateline Road), but it was
    productive in giving us our first NCB of the trip, LONG-BILLED DOWITCHER. Several Redhead pairs were enjoyable. There were also about 100 WHITE-FACED IBIS,
    which turned out to be a surprising previous county miss. Siskiyou County,
    05/09/17 Having stayed overnight in Madras, we didn’t get back down to
    California until noon. This time, we
    more intensively birded the Lower Klamath and Tule Lake NWR’s. Along SR-161, at the junction of Lower
    Klamath Lake Road, we found a mixed Icterid flock that included Tricolored
    Blackbirds & Yellow-headed Blackbirds.
    We took Lower Klamath Lake Rd south for a few miles, getting a
    Ferruginous Hawk near the junction with SR-161, and a SAGE THRASHER perhaps
    3-miles in. After returning to Stateline Road, we turned south on Hill
    Road to get to the auto tour route south of the refuge headquarters. At Tour Stop #1 (which is actually still on
    Hill Road), we got a CLARK’S GREBE amongst the more populous Western
    Grebes. Near where the auto tour route
    turns east out into the refuge, we discovered a PEREGRINE FALCON perched on top
    of the rocky wall west of the road.
    Scanning the cave entrances in the rock wall, focusing on the
    guano-covered openings, we found a Great Horned Owl. Caspian Terns squawked overhead. Siskiyou County,
    05/10/17 We stayed in Yreka last night to get an early start on the way
    to Weaverville along SR-3. The town of
    Etna, in Scotts Valley, was searched for Great-tailed Grackles &
    White-tailed Kites, both of which have been seen here, albeit in the dead of
    winter. We didn’t get either of these,
    but at the Etna City Park we did carefully sort through a flock of CEDAR
    WAXWINGs for its congener (no luck). A
    Lewis’s Woodpecker and Townsend’s Solitaire were both seen along SR-3 downhill
    from the summit. At the summit of SR-3, where the Pacific Crest Trail crosses
    the highway, I have always had trouble deciding where the Siskiyou/Trinity
    county line is. Arbitrarily, I’ve chosen
    the PCT as the line; birds on the south side are in Trinity, birds on the north
    are in Siskiyou, and birds flying across the trail are counted in both
    counties. So it was, for instance, that
    a Brown Creeper on a tree just off the PCT to the south was a Trinity bird –
    regrettably, I needed it for Siskiyou but not Trinity. Other interesting birds seen here were
    Green-tailed Towhee, Chipping Sparrow, Cassin’s Finch … never in a “needed”
    county. Trinity County, 05/10/17 The Lewiston Fish Hatchery had an Osprey driving off an adult
    Bald Eagle – usually, it is the opposite.
    Along Lewiston Road on the way to the Fish Hatchery from Weaverville, we
    got a WILSON’S WARBLER. At the Mary
    Smith Campground along Trinity Dam Road, we encountered an assemblage of
    coniferous forest birds, including: Warbling Vireo, Black-throated Gray
    Warbler, Western Tanager, Cassin’s Vireo & Hairy Woodpecker. Trinity County, 05/11/17 First stop for the day was Summit Creek Road off of SR-3 north
    of Hayfork. This road passes through
    some good xeric sage habitat, and has been a go-to spot for county birders
    since “discovered” by Steve Glover in August, 2005. Here, we added BLUE-GRAY GNATCATCHER, but
    failed to pish up either a Bell’s Sparrow or Rufous-crowned Sparrow. Of course if one is driving on SR-3 to Hayfork, THE
    destination is the Hayfork Water Treatment Plant. This is accessed from Tule Creek Road, which
    is just a few feet south of the bridge over Hayfork Creek. I usually blow past the entry road to the
    WTP, which is not marked in any way.
    About a ˝-mile from SR-3, the road makes a gentle 90° turn to the left
    (south). Within 500’, a road goes off to
    the left – this is the entrance road.
    Sometimes the gate is closed, compelling one to walk in. There are signs indicating “Authorized
    Personnel Only,” but birders are welcomed.
    Wood Ducks were herding their chicks.
    Lots of swallows including BARN SWALLOW, my 57 th county for
    this bird, were flying around.
    Shorebirds were the target here, but we only got Spotted Sandpiper &
    Short-billed Dowitcher (it called).
    However, a flock of BAND-TAILED PIGEONs flew over. A female & 1 st -year male
    Bullock’s Oriole put in an appearance – the 1 st -year male always
    gets heart beating faster as I contemplate Hooded Oriole (which would be a
    county record for Trinity). At the
    entrance gate, Salt Creek is very near the road, and a number YELLOW-BREASTED
    CHATs were heard, and a male Lazuli Bunting was singing from an exposed perch. We went back through Hayfork to take Wildwood Road over to
    SR-36. Along this road are many
    opportunities to pull off and bird.
    Along this road, we saw a beautiful HERMIT WARBLER. All in all, a good trip with 7 NCB’s for each county, bringing
    me to within 2 for color change in each county.
    Guess I’ll have to return. Good birding, Stephen Long Oakland, CA diomedea (dot) Stephen (at) gmail (dot) com
  8. -back to top-
  9. RE: Orchard vs. Hooded Orioles LINK
    DATE: Dec 30, 2015 @ 7:47pm, 3 year(s) ago
    I've heard "chuck" calls from adult Hooded Orioles in spring on the breeding grounds within the Prado Basin of RIV/SBE CO. However, I've never heard that call from wintering birds in Orange County over the years.
    
    Jim Pike
    HB
    
    Note that in the late summer and early fall young Hooded Orioles do give a soft “chup” call. I don’t know if that continues later on in life, but I hear it from birds in family groups in my yard, birds that have bred in the area.
    
    Alvaro
    
    
  10. -back to top-
  11. RE: [CALBIRDS] Orchard vs. Hooded Orioles LINK
    DATE: Dec 30, 2015 @ 6:43pm, 3 year(s) ago
    Paul,
    
    Note that in the late summer and early fall young Hooded Orioles do give a soft “chup” call. I don’t know if that continues later on in life, but I hear it from birds in family groups in my yard, birds that have bred in the area.
    
    Regards
    
    Alvaro
    
    Alvaro Jaramillo
    
    <mailto:alvaro@...> alvaro@...
    
    www.alvarosadventures.com
    
    From: CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Paul Lehman lehman.paul1@... [CALBIRDS]
    Sent: Saturday, December 26, 2015 1:31 PM
    To: CALBIRDS <CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com>
    Subject: [CALBIRDS] Orchard vs. Hooded Orioles
    
    The current Orchard Oriole in Santa Clara County has generated some
    posts with info on the relative status and ID of Orchards and Hoodeds in
    winter in CA. I'd like to throw out a few thoughts. First off, some
    silent non-adult males of these species are quite straightforward to ID,
    and some are definitely not! The hardest birds are actually in early
    fall when the last of the juvenile Hoodeds are still around, and many of
    those birds have shorter and straighter bills than do adults, so they
    look a lot more like Orchards. (Young oriole bills typically have
    extensive pale horn color at the base.) By December, even the young
    Hoodeds "should" have a more "typical" bills. And in fact, in winter it
    is longish-looking-billed ORCHARD Orioles that seem to cause many of the
    problems. Some Orchards clearly do NOT have "short, straight" bills,
    but rather have intermediate bill length and which have a noticeable
    droop toward the tip, though not as much as in the typical Hooded.
    Curtis Marantz recently sed the phrase that "they seem to show an
    overbight"; and that seems to be an accurate way of stating the look.
    
    Orchards are typically smaller, shorter tailed, rounder headed (thus
    "cuter"), are slightly greener above (though some birds are grayer than
    they are green, and thus a lot like Hooded in this regard), and are
    brighter, cleaner, more lemony yellow below. Hoodeds are slightly
    longer, sleeker, longer tailed, often have a more graduated tail tip,
    and typically are a slightly duller yellow--a more mustard yellow
    (although many fresh juvenile Hoodeds are fairly clean yellow), and
    often with grayish-white on the flanks and sometimes across the lower
    vent). Joe Morlan's post today on South Bay Birds also mentions the
    possible differences in wing-bar boldness. Joe also gives a link to
    photos of 2 winter birds at Middle Lake in San Francisco from 2004 that
    were ID'd at the time as Hoodeds, but which certainly look fine for
    Orchards in these photos (e.g., note the brightness and quality of the
    yellow, as well as bill size and shape).
    
    And while, constantly giving soft "chuck" notes is fine for Orchard, and
    soft whistled "wheet" calls are great for Hoodeds, BOTH species can give
    a soft, quiet chatter--softer, often shorter and faster, and definitely
    not as raspy as a Bullock's Oriole chatter.
    
    BUT.....sometimes there are even birds in winter that cause all sorts of
    ID problems. On multiple occasions I've even seen small mixed flocks
    where no one birder agreed on exactly how many birds were Orchards and
    how many were Hoodeds!! And in these cases you even have direction
    comparisons available, which are typically not possible with all the
    typically lone birds. This non-agreement on winter ID of "flocks" has
    happened over the years in both Santa Barbara and San Diego, for
    example. Sometimes I feel fairly "good" about the ID of a
    tougher-looking (i.e., more intermediate) bird, but then the longer I
    stare at it, the more confused I get!!! Perhaps there is something to be
    said with going with one's first impressions when dealing with these
    two species--to a point, that is!
    
    Lastly, there is relative status of the two species in winter. I'd say
    that Orchard is more likely than Hooded in most of CA at this
    season--certainly so anywhere north of about Point Conception. South of
    there, Orchard still outnumbers Hoodeds most winters, some years greatly
    so; and only rarely is there a winter even in s. CA with more Hoodeds
    than Orchards. And the winter of 2015-2016 is shaping up to be a good
    one for wintering Orchards in the state. Several are currently in n. CA
    (Del Norte, SF, Santa Clara), and farther south a couple are in SLO, 1+
    in Orange, and 5+ in San Diego Co. I am undoubtedly forgetting some.
    And more will certainly be found as the winter goes on. As for Hooded
    Orioles, there are currently 2-3 in San Diego County. Any others
    
    I think that many of the older reports of Hooded Orioles north of Pt
    Conception should perhaps be re-examined, if not adult males, to see if
    they were truly Hoodeds. Undoubtedly some are, but some may well not
    be--as Joe's San Francisco birds from 2004 show. Some "Hoodeds" may need
    to be demoted to uncertain Hooded/Orchards. I was recently involved in
    discussions with Oregon and Washington records committee members about
    their relative numbers of accepted late fall and winter Orchards vs.
    Hoodeds, as at least Oregon seemed to have a disproportionately high
    number of Hoodeds vs. Orchards accepted for that state at that season. A
    quick review of past photos of several OR birds showed that indeed a
    couple were in fact Orchards, although some of them indeed were Hoodeds.
    But the Oregon records committee does plan on doing a full re-review of
    their past records, and it is likely that some "Hoodeds" will become
    Orchards or will become Hooded/Orchards.
    
    --Paul Lehman, San Diego
    
    
  12. -back to top-
  13. Orchard vs. Hooded Orioles LINK
    DATE: Dec 26, 2015 @ 1:31pm, 3 year(s) ago
    The current Orchard Oriole in Santa Clara County has generated some
    posts with info on the relative status and ID of Orchards and Hoodeds in
    winter in CA. I'd like to throw out a few thoughts. First off, some
    silent non-adult males of these species are quite straightforward to ID,
    and some are definitely not! The hardest birds are actually in early
    fall when the last of the juvenile Hoodeds are still around, and many of
    those birds have shorter and straighter bills than do adults, so they
    look a lot more like Orchards. (Young oriole bills typically have
    extensive pale horn color at the base.) By December, even the young
    Hoodeds "should" have a more "typical" bills. And in fact, in winter it
    is longish-looking-billed ORCHARD Orioles that seem to cause many of the
    problems. Some Orchards clearly do NOT have "short, straight" bills,
    but rather have intermediate bill length and which have a noticeable
    droop toward the tip, though not as much as in the typical Hooded.
    Curtis Marantz recently sed the phrase that "they seem to show an
    overbight"; and that seems to be an accurate way of stating the look.
    
    Orchards are typically smaller, shorter tailed, rounder headed (thus
    "cuter"), are slightly greener above (though some birds are grayer than
    they are green, and thus a lot like Hooded in this regard), and are
    brighter, cleaner, more lemony yellow below. Hoodeds are slightly
    longer, sleeker, longer tailed, often have a more graduated tail tip,
    and typically are a slightly duller yellow--a more mustard yellow
    (although many fresh juvenile Hoodeds are fairly clean yellow), and
    often with grayish-white on the flanks and sometimes across the lower
    vent). Joe Morlan's post today on South Bay Birds also mentions the
    possible differences in wing-bar boldness. Joe also gives a link to
    photos of 2 winter birds at Middle Lake in San Francisco from 2004 that
    were ID'd at the time as Hoodeds, but which certainly look fine for
    Orchards in these photos (e.g., note the brightness and quality of the
    yellow, as well as bill size and shape).
    
    And while, constantly giving soft "chuck" notes is fine for Orchard, and
    soft whistled "wheet" calls are great for Hoodeds, BOTH species can give
    a soft, quiet chatter--softer, often shorter and faster, and definitely
    not as raspy as a Bullock's Oriole chatter.
    
    BUT.....sometimes there are even birds in winter that cause all sorts of
    ID problems. On multiple occasions I've even seen small mixed flocks
    where no one birder agreed on exactly how many birds were Orchards and
    how many were Hoodeds!! And in these cases you even have direction
    comparisons available, which are typically not possible with all the
    typically lone birds. This non-agreement on winter ID of "flocks" has
    happened over the years in both Santa Barbara and San Diego, for
    example. Sometimes I feel fairly "good" about the ID of a
    tougher-looking (i.e., more intermediate) bird, but then the longer I
    stare at it, the more confused I get!!! Perhaps there is something to be
    said with going with one's first impressions when dealing with these
    two species--to a point, that is!
    
    Lastly, there is relative status of the two species in winter. I'd say
    that Orchard is more likely than Hooded in most of CA at this
    season--certainly so anywhere north of about Point Conception. South of
    there, Orchard still outnumbers Hoodeds most winters, some years greatly
    so; and only rarely is there a winter even in s. CA with more Hoodeds
    than Orchards. And the winter of 2015-2016 is shaping up to be a good
    one for wintering Orchards in the state. Several are currently in n. CA
    (Del Norte, SF, Santa Clara), and farther south a couple are in SLO, 1+
    in Orange, and 5+ in San Diego Co. I am undoubtedly forgetting some.
    And more will certainly be found as the winter goes on. As for Hooded
    Orioles, there are currently 2-3 in San Diego County. Any others
    
    I think that many of the older reports of Hooded Orioles north of Pt
    Conception should perhaps be re-examined, if not adult males, to see if
    they were truly Hoodeds. Undoubtedly some are, but some may well not
    be--as Joe's San Francisco birds from 2004 show. Some "Hoodeds" may need
    to be demoted to uncertain Hooded/Orchards. I was recently involved in
    discussions with Oregon and Washington records committee members about
    their relative numbers of accepted late fall and winter Orchards vs.
    Hoodeds, as at least Oregon seemed to have a disproportionately high
    number of Hoodeds vs. Orchards accepted for that state at that season. A
    quick review of past photos of several OR birds showed that indeed a
    couple were in fact Orchards, although some of them indeed were Hoodeds.
    But the Oregon records committee does plan on doing a full re-review of
    their past records, and it is likely that some "Hoodeds" will become
    Orchards or will become Hooded/Orchards.
    
    --Paul Lehman, San Diego
    
    
  14. -back to top-
  15. Kern County Birdiest Count Final Report Including Locations LINK
    DATE: May 8, 2015 @ 10:46am, 3 year(s) ago
    Hi,
    
    "Missed"or just not present (too early, too late, no coverage where
    occurs, and/or rare to very rare and not annual; several known
    usual nesting species missed) - Lesser Scaup, Common
    Goldeneye, Common Merganser,
    Red-breasted Merganser, Ring-necked Pheasant, Pacific Loon,
    Common
    Loon, Horned Grebe,
    American Bittern (Kern NWR), Least Bittern (Kern
    NWR), Northern Goshawk, Bald Eagle, Lesser Yellowlegs, Ruddy
    Turnstone,
    Short-billed Dowitcher, Herring Gull, Common Ground-Dove,
    Vaux's Swift,
    Williamson's Sapsucker, Pileated Woodpecker, Merlin, Peregrine
    Falcon, Brown-crested Flycatcher, Yellow-billed Magpie, Clark's
    Nutcracker,
    Pacific
    Wren,
    Varied Thrush,
    Sage Thrasher, American Pipit, Vesper
    Sparrow, Grasshopper
    Sparrow, Swamp Sparrow, Harris's Sparrow, Indigo Bunting, Red
    Crossbill, plus even rarer species,...
    
    CONTENTS:
    ***Count Period
    ***Reported in 2014, not in 2015
    ***Reported in 2015, not in 2014
    ***2015 Kern Birdiest Count Period List of 227 species
    ***Total Species Numbers from all prior 72 hour Kern Birdiest Counts
    ***79 Known Participants
    
    ***72 Hour Kern County Birdiest Count, 3:30pm, Thursday, April 1, 2015
    through
    to 3:30pm, Sunday, May 3, 2015.
    
    ***REPORTED IN 2014, NOT IN 2015: Lesser Scaup,
    Common Goldeneye, Common Merganser, Red-breasted Merganser, Common
    Loon, Horned Grebe, Northern Goshawk, Lesser Yellowlegs, Ruddy
    Turnstone, Short-billed Dowitcher, Common Ground-Dove, Vaux's Swift,
    Pileated Woodpecker, Peregrine Falcon, Plumbeous Vireo, Clark's
    Nutcracker, Pacific Wren, American Pipit, Grasshopper Sparrow, Red
    Crossbill,...
    
    ***REPORTED IN 2015, NOT IN 2014: Canvasback,
    Red
    Knot,
    Sanderling,
    Baird's
    Sandpiper,
    Semipalmated
    Sandpiper,
    Vermilion
    Flycatcher,
    Evening
    Grosbeak
    
    NOTE: Species reported in UPPER CASE
    LETTERS; species missed during count listed in lower case letters. Remember,
    UPPER
    CASE
    LETTERING
    shows
    2015 species reported.
    
    ***2015 KERN BIRDIEST COUNT PERIOD LIST (XXX SPECIES):
    
    ***NOT expected - convincing details and/or pictures required
    
    GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE - Frazier ParkSnow GooseROSS'S GOOSE - California CityBrant***Cackling Goose***CANADA GOOSE - Bakersfield's Truxton Lakes, Kern River County
    Park, Lake Woollomes east of
    Delano, WOOD DUCK- Kern River County Park, Kern River PreserveGADWALL- reports for numerous locationsAMERICAN WIGEON - Bear Valley Springs/Tehahchapi, China Lake
    NAWS,
    Kern NWREurasian Wigeon***MALLARD- reports for numerous locationsBLUE-WINGED TEAL - China Lake NAWSCINNAMON TEAL- China Lake NAWS, Kern NWRNORTHERN SHOVELER- China Lake NAWS, Kern NWRNORTHERN PINTAIL - Kern NWRGREEN-WINGED TEAL- China Lake NAWSCANVASBACK - Kern NWRREDHEAD- California City, China Lake NAWS, Kern NWRRING-NECKED DUCK- Lake Jean,, Tehachapi WTP (sewage ponds)Greater Scaup***Lesser ScaupBUFFLEHEAD - China Lake NAWS, Lake Woollomes east of DelanoCommon GoldeneyeCommon MerganserRed-breasted Merganser***RUDDY DUCK- reports for numerous
    locationsMOUNTAIN QUAIL- reports for numerous locationsCALIFORNIA QUAIL - reports for
    numerous locationsCHUKAR - Butterbredt Spring, Wind Wolves PreserveRing-necked PheasantSOOTY GROUSE***- Sunday Peak in the Greenhorn MountainsWILD TURKEY- Kern River PreservePacific Loon***Common Loon***PIED-BILLED GREBE- reports for numerous locationsHorned Grebe***EARED GREBE- China Lake NAWS, Kern NWRWESTERN GREBE- Isabella Reservoir, Kern NWR, Kern River County
    Park, Lake
    Woollomes east of DelanoCLARK'S GREBE - Isabella Reservoir, Kern River County Park, Lake
    Woollomes east of DelanoDOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT- China Lake NAWS, Kern NWR, Kern River
    County
    Park, Lake Woollomes east of
    DelanoAMERICAN WHITE PELICAN - Isabella ReservoirAmerican BitternLeast Bittern***GREAT BLUE HERON- reports for numerous locationsGREAT EGRET- reports for numerous
    locationsSNOWY EGRET- Kern NWR, Kernville, Lake Woollomes east of DelanoCATTLE EGRET- From along CA Hwy 99 south of Bakersfield,
    Tehachapi's Tom Sawyer LakeGREEN HERON - Edwards AFB, GalileoBLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON - California City, Edwards AFB, Kern
    NWR, Lake
    Woollomes east of Delano, Tehachapi WTP (sewage ponds)WHITE-FACED IBIS- reports for numerous locationsTURKEY VULTURE- reports for
    numerous locationsCALIFORNIA CONDOR (now countable) - Bear Valley Springs, Tejon
    RanchOSPREY - Edwards AFB, Isabella Reservor--Nuui CunniWHITE-TAILED KITE - Edwards AFBGOLDEN EAGLE - Breckenridge Mountain, west of Rosamond, Wind
    Wolves PreserveNORTHERN HARRIER - Edwards AFB, Garces Hwy west of Delano, Kern
    NWR, Wind Wolves PreserveSHARP-SHINNED HAWK - GalileoCOOPER'S HAWK- Ridgecrest,
    Kernville, Lake Woollomes east of Delano, TehachapiNorthern Goshawk***Bald EagleCommon Black Hawk***RED-SHOULDERED HAWK - Kern River Parkway corridor through
    Bakersfield, Kern River PreserveSWAINSON'S HAWK - Garces Hwy west of Delano, Kern NWR, Sand
    Canyon above Iindian Wells Valley, Tehachapi, Tule Elk State Reserve
    (two nesting
    pairs)Zone-tailed Hawk***RED-TAILED HAWK- reports for
    numerous locationsVIRGINIA RAIL- China Lake NAWS, Kern NWRSORA- California City, China Lake NAWS, Kern NWRCOMMON GALLINULE - China Lake NAWS, Kern NWRAMERICAN COOT- reports for
    numerous locations
    BLACK-NECKED STILT - China Lake NAWS, Kern NWR, Lake Woollomes
    east of
    DelanoAMERICAN AVOCET - China Lake NAWS, Isabella Reservoir, Kern NWR,
    Lake
    Woollomes east of DelanoBLACK-BELLIED PLOVER - Lake Woollomes east of DelanoAmerican Golden-Plover***Pacific Golden-Plover***
    SNOWY PLOVER - Lake Woollomes east of Delano, San Joaquin Valley private propertySEMIPALMATED PLOVER- China Lake NAWS, Isabella Reservoir, San Joaquin Valley private
    propertyKILLDEER- reports for numerous locationsSPOTTED SANDPIPER - reports for
    numerous locationsSOLITARY SANDPIPER - "Old Sewage Ponds" at Ridgecrest Watchable
    Wildlife ParkWandering Tattler***GREATER YELLOWLEGS- Kern NWRWILLET - San Joaquin Valley
    private propertyLesser YellowlegsWHIMBREL- China Lake NAWS, Kern NWR, San Joaquin Valley private propertyLONG-BILLED CURLEW- China Lake NAWS, Lake Woollomes east of DelanoMARBLED GODWIT - China Lake NAWSRuddy Turnstone***RED KNOT*** - San Joaquin Valley
    private propertyRuff***Stilt Sandpiper***SANDERLING*** - San Joaquin Valley
    private propertyDUNLIN - China Lake NAWS, Kern NWR, Lake Woollomes east of
    Delano,
    San Joaquin Valley private propertyBAIRD'S SANDPIPER*** - China Lake NAWS, San Joaquin Valley private propertyLEAST SANDPIPER - China Lake NAWSPectoral Sandpiper***SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER*** - San Joaquin Valley
    private propertyWESTERN SANDPIPER - China Lake NAWS, Lake Woollomes east of DelanoShort-billed Dowitcher**LONG-BILLED DOWITCHER- China Lake NAWS, Kern NWR, Lake Woollomes
    east of
    DelanoWILSON'S SNIPE - China Lake NAWSWILSON'S PHALAROPE - China Lake NAWSRED-NECKED PHALAROPE- China Lake NAWS, San Joaquin Valley private propertyRed Phalarope***BONAPARTE'S GULL - San Joaquin
    Valley private propertyLittle Gull***FRANKLIN'S GULL - China Lake NAWSHeerman's Gull***RING-BILLED GULL - China Lake NAWS, , Kern River County Park
    (Lake Ming), Lake Woollomes east of DelanoWestern Gull***CALIFORNIA GULL- China Lake NAWS, Isabella Reservoir, Kern River
    County Park (Lake Ming), San Joaquin Valley private propertyHerring GullGULL-BILLED TERN*** - San Joaquin
    Valley private propertyCASPIAN TERN - Lake Woollomes east of Delano, San Joaquin Valley
    private propertyBLACK TERN - San Joaquin Valley
    private propertyCommon Tern***FORSTER'S TERN - Isabella Reservoir, Kern River County Park (Lake
    Ming), Lake Woollomes east of DelanoROCK PIGEON - RidgecrestBAND-TAILED PIGEON - Bear Valley Springs/Tehachapi, Lebec,
    Panorama Vista Preserve (Bakersfield), Pine
    Mountain Club, Squirrel Valley above Mountain Mesa, Tehachapi Mountain
    ParkEURASIAN COLLARED-DOVE- reports
    for numerous locationsSPOTTED DOVE - Bakersfield's Beale ParkInca Dove***Common Ground-Dove
    WHITE-WINGED DOVE*** - China Lake NAWS, RidgecrestMOURNING DOVE - reports for
    numerous locations
    GREATER ROADRUNNER - Indian Wells Valley, Kern NWR, west of
    Rosamond, Wind Wolves PreserveBARN OWL - Kern River PreserveFLAMMULATED OWL - Breckenridge MountainWESTERN SCREECH-OWL- Breckenridge MountainGREAT HORNED OWL- Cerro Coso Community College, Fay Ranch Rd in
    Weldon, Wind Wolves PreserveNORTHERN PYGMY-OWL - Breckenridge MountainBURROWING OWL- RidgecrestSPOTTED OWL- Breckenridge MountainLONG-EARED OWL - RidgecrestShort-eared Owl***NORTHERN SAW-WHET OWL- Breckenridge MountainLESSER NIGHTHAWK - California City, Kern NWRCOMMON POORWILL- Fay Ranch Rd in WeldonBlack Swift***Vaux's SwiftWHITE-THROATED SWIFT- Galileo, Sand Canyon above Indian Wells
    Valley (part of the Southern Sierra Desert Canyons Important Bird
    Area),
    Wind Wolves PreserveBLACK-CHINNED HUMMINGBIRD - reports
    for
    numerous
    locationsANNA'S HUMMINGBIRD - reports for
    numerous locationsCOSTA'S HUMMINGBIRD- reports for numerous desert locationsBroad-tailed Hummingbird***RUFOUS HUMMINGBIRD - Bakersfield, Galileo, Ridgecrest, TehachapiCALLIOPE HUMMINGBIRD - GalileoBELTED KINGFISHER - GalileoLEWIS'S WOODPECKER - Sand Canyon above Indian Wells Valley (part
    of the Southern Sierra Desert Canyons Important Bird Area)ACORN WOODPECKER- reports for numerous locations including the
    desertWilliamson's Sapsucker***Red-naped Sapsucker***RED-BREASTED SAPSUCKER - Greenhorn Mountains, Tehachapi Mountain
    ParkLADDER-BACKED WOODPECKER - reports for numerous desert locationsNUTTALL'S WOODPECKER - Kern River Preserve, Sand Canyon above
    Indian Wells Valley, Tehachapi, Wind Wolves PreserveDOWNY WOODPECKER - Kern River PreserveHAIRY WOODPECKER - Breckenridge Mountain, Greenhorn Mountains,
    Kern River PreserveWHITE-HEADED WOODPECKER- Breckenridge Mountain, Greenhorn
    Mountains, Tehachapi
    Mountain ParkNORTHERN FLICKER - reports for numerous locationsPileated WoodpeckerAMERICAN KESTREL- reports for numerous locationsMerlin***Peregrine FalconPRAIRIE FALCON - Kern River PreserveROSE-RINGED PARAKEET - Bakersfield west of CA Hwy 99,
    Bakersfield's Beale Park (notable even
    though not currently
    countable)OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER- Breckenridge Mountain, Galileo,
    Butterbredt Spring, China Lake NAWS, Greenhorn Mountains, Lake
    Woollomes
    east of DelanoWESTERN WOOD-PEWEE - reports for numerous
    locationsWillow Flycatcher***HAMMOND'S FLYCATCHER - Butterbredt Spring, Galileo, Greenhorn
    Mountains, RidgecrestGRAY FLYCATCHER - 10 miles south of Weldon, Galileo, Kern
    River PreserveDUSKY FLYCATCHER - Cow Heaven Canyon (part of
    Southern Sierra Desert Canyons Important Bird Area), Edwards
    AFB, Galileo, Greenhorn Mountains, Kern NWRPACIFIC-SLOPE FLYCATCHER - reports for numerous locationsBLACK PHOEBE- reports for numerous locationsSAY'S PHOEBE - reports for numerous locationsVERMILION FLYCATCHER - Kern River PreserveASH-THROATED FLYCATCHER - reports for numerous
    locationsBrown-crested FlycatcherCASSIN'S KINGBIRD- Kern River County Park (Lake Ming), Paul's
    Place country store (Weldon)WESTERN KINGBIRD- reports for numerous locationsLOGGERHEAD SHRIKE- reports for numerous locationsBell's Vireo***CASSIN'S VIREO - reports for numerous locationsPlumbeous Vireo***HUTTON'S VIREO - Breckenridge Mountain, Greenhorn Mountains west
    slopeWARBLING VIREO - reports for numerous locationsPINYON JAY - Cow Heaven Canyon (part of the Southern Sierra
    Desert Canyons Important Bird Area)STELLER'S JAY- Greenhorn Mountains, Tehachapi, Tehachapi Mountain
    Park, Wind Wolves PreserveWESTERN SCRUB-JAY- reports for numerous locationsYellow-billed MagpieClark's NutcrackerAMERICAN CROW- reports for numerous locationsCOMMON RAVEN - reports for numerous locationsHORNED LARK - Edwards AFB, Inyokern, Isabella Reservoir,
    Ridgecrest, Wind Wolves Preserve NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOW- reports for
    numerous locationsPURPLE MARTIN - Bear Valley SpringsTREE SWALLOW- reports for numerous locationsVIOLET-GREEN SWALLOW - Bear Valley Springs, Greenhorn Mountains,
    Tehachapi, Tehachapi
    Mountain ParkBANK SWALLOW - Kern River corridor in BakersfieldBARN SWALLOW - China Lake NAWS, Galileo, Lake Woollomes east of
    DelanoCLIFF SWALLOW - reports for numerous locationsMOUNTAIN CHICKADEE- Breckenridge Mountain, Greenhorn Mountains,
    Tehachapi Mountain ParkOAK TITMOUSE - reports for numerous locationsVERDIN- China Lake NAWS, Galileo, Inyokern, Inyokern--MiddlemissBUSHTIT - Kern River Preserve, Wind Wolves PreserveRED-BREASTED NUTHATCH- Breckenridge Mountain, Greenhorn
    Mountains, Tehachapi Mountain
    ParkWHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCH - reports for numerous
    locationsPYGMY NUTHATCH - Bear Mountain above Bear Valley Springs, Cerro
    Noroeste Rd in the Mt. Pinos regionBROWN CREEPER- Greenhorn MountainsROCK WREN- Edwards AFB, Galileo Hill, Isabella Reservoir sides,
    Wind Wolves PreserveCANYON WREN - Kern River Canyon mouth near Bakersfield city
    limitsHOUSE WREN - reports for numerous locationsPacific WrenMARSH WREN - China Lake NAWS, Kern NWRBEWICK'S WREN - reports for numerous locationsCACTUS WREN - reports for numerous locationsBLUE-GRAY GNATCATCHER - Edwards AFB, Galileo, Greenhorn
    Mountains,
    Kelso
    Valley
    Rd--Mile
    8.0
    to
    Mile
    12.0,AMERICAN DIPPER - Kern River Canyon mouth near Bakersfield city
    limitsGOLDEN-CROWNED KINGLET - Greenhorn MountainsRUBY-CROWNED KINGLET - China Lake NAWS, GalileoWRENTIT - Breckenridge Mountain, Fay Ranch Rd (upper part),
    Greenhorn Mountains, Wind Wolves
    PreserveWESTERN BLUEBIRD - reports for numerous locationsMountain Bluebird***TOWNSEND'S SOLITAIRE- Greenhorn MountainsSWAINSON'S THRUSH - Butterbredt Spring, Cerro Coso Community
    College, GalileoHERMIT THRUSH- Galileo, Kern NWR, Ridgecrest, Wind Wolves PreserveAMERICAN ROBIN - reports for numerous locationsVaried Thrush***Brown Thrasher***Bendire's Thrasher***CALIFORNIA THRASHER - Fay Ranch Rd (upper), Kern River corridor
    in Bakersfield, Lebec,
    Wind Wolves PreserveLE CONTE'S THRASHER - California City, Cow Heaven Canyon (part of
    Southern Sierra Desert Canyons Important Bird Area), Inyokern, Maricopa
    (Petroleum Club Rd)Sage Thrasher***NORTHERN MOCKINGBIRD - reports for numerous
    locationsEUROPEAN STARLING- reports for numerous locationsAmerican PipitCEDAR WAXWING - Bakersfield, Butterbredt Spring, China Lake NAWS,
    Edwards AFB,
    Galileo, Lake
    Woollomes east
    of DelanoPHAINOPEPLA - reports for numerous locationsOvenbird***Northern Waterthrush***Black-and-white Warbler***ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER - reports for numerous
    locationsLucy's Warbler***NASHVILLE WARBLER - Greenhorn MountainsMACGILLIVRAY'S WARBLER - reports for numerous locationsCOMMON YELLOWTHROAT- reports for numerous
    locationsHooded Warbler***Northern Parula***Magnolia Warbler***YELLOW WARBLER- reports for numerous locationsPalm Warbler***YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER (AUDUBON'S & MYRTLE) - reports
    for
    numerous
    locationsGrace's Warbler***BLACK-THROATED GRAY WARBLER - China Lake NAWS, Galileo, Lake
    Woollomes
    east of DelanoTOWNSEND'S WARBLER - Butterbredt Spring, Galileo, Ridgecrest's
    Desert Memorial Park (cemetery), TehachapiHERMIT WARBLER - China Lake NAWS, GalileoWILSON'S WARBLER - reports for numerous locationsPainted Redstart***YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT - Galileo, Kern River PreserveGREEN-TAILED TOWHEE- California City, Galileo, Greenhorn MountainsSPOTTED TOWHEE- Galileo, Greenhorn Mountains, Kern River
    Preserve, Tehachapi Mountain
    Park,
    Wind Wolves PreserveRUFOUS-CROWNED SPARROW- Wofford HeightsCALIFORNIA TOWHEE - reports for numerous locationsCHIPPING SPARROW- Breckenridge Mountain, Butterbredt Spring,
    Edwards AFBClay-colored Sparrow***BREWER'S SPARROW - Edwards AFB, Kelso Valley
    Rd--Mile 8.0
    to Mile 12.0,BLACK-CHINNED SPARROW- Chimney Peak Byway, Piute Mountains
    (Saddle Springs Rd)Vesper Sparrow***LARK SPARROW - Galileo, Kelso Valley Rd--Mile 8.0
    to 12.0, Tehachapi, Wind Wolves PreserveBLACK-THROATED SPARROW - Cow Heaven Canyon (part
    of
    Southern Sierra Desert Canyons Important Bird Area), Edwards
    AFB, Kelso Valley Rd--Mile 8.0
    to Mile 12.0, off Kelso Valley Rd 10 miles south of
    WeldonBELL'S SPARROW (MOJAVE) - California City, Cow
    Heaven Canyon (part of
    Southern Sierra Desert Canyons Important Bird Area), Edwards AFB, InyokernLark Bunting***SAVANNAH SPARROW- reports for numerous locationsGrasshopper Sparrow***FOX SPARROW- Breckenridge Mountain, Greenhorn MountainsSONG SPARROW- reports for numerous locationsLINCOLN'S SPARROW - China Lake NAWS, Galileo, Greenhorn
    Mountains, Kern River PreserveSwamp Sparrow***WHITE-THROATED SPARROW*** - GalileoHarris's Sparrow***WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW- Galileo (Mountain White-crowned/oriantha
    subspecies), off Kelso Valley Rd 10 miles south of
    WeldonGOLDEN-CROWNED SPARROW- Bear Mountain above Bear Valley Springs,
    California City, Greenhorn Mountains, Kern River PreserveDARK-EYED JUNCO- Breckenridge Mountain, Greenhorn Mountains,
    Tehachapi Mountain ParkSUMMER TANAGER- Kern River Preserve (several locations)WESTERN TANAGER - reports for numerous locationsPhyrrhuloxia***Rose-breasted Grosbeak***BLACK-HEADED GROSBEAK- reports for numerous
    locationsBLUE GROSBEAK - Kern River Preserve, Lake Woollomes east of
    Delano, Wind Wolves
    PreserveLAZULI BUNTING - Butterbredt Spring, China Lake NAWS, Piute
    Mountains (Saddle Springs
    Rd), TehachapiIndigo Bunting***RED-WINGED BLACKBIRD- widespreadTRICOLORED BLACKBIRD- Bear Valley Springs/Tehachapi, Edwards AFB,
    Kern River Preserve, Lake Isabella (community of), Wind Wolves PreserveWESTERN MEADOWLARK- reports for numerous locationsYELLOW-HEADED BLACKBIRD - California City, China Lake NAWS,
    GalileoBREWER'S BLACKBIRD - reports for numerous
    locationsCommon Grackle***GREAT-TAILED GRACKLE - reports for numerous
    locationsBronzed Cowbird***BROWN-HEADED COWBIRD - reports for numerous
    locationsOrchard Oriole***HOODED ORIOLE - Bakersfield, off Kelso Valley Rd
    10 miles south of Weldon, Kernville, Lake Woollomes east of
    DelanoBULLOCK'S ORIOLE- reports for numerous locationsSCOTT'S ORIOLE - Cow Heaven Canyon (part of
    Southern Sierra Desert Canyons Important Bird Area), Edwards
    AFB, Kelso Valley Rd--Mile 8.0
    to Mile 12.0, off Kelso Valley Rd
    10 miles south of WeldonHOUSE FINCH - reports for numerous locationsPURPLE FINCH - Bear Valley Springs, Kern NWR, Tehachapi Mountain
    ParkCASSIN'S FINCH - Breckenridge Mountain, Greenhorn MountainsRed CrossbillPINE SISKIN - Bear Mountain above Bear Valley Springs,
    Butterbredt Spring, Galileo,
    TehachapiLESSER GOLDFINCH- reports for numerous locationsLAWRENCE'S GOLDFINCH - reports for numerous
    locationsAMERICAN GOLDFINCH - Bakersfield, Kern River County Park--Hart
    Park unit, Lebec, Wind Wolves PreserveEVENING GROSBEAK*** - GalileoHOUSE SPARROW- reports for numerous locations
    
    ***TOTAL SPECIES NUMBERS FROM KERN BIRDIEST 72 HOUR
    COUNTS: 2006-246 species, 2007-235 species, 2008-241 species, 2009-246
    species, 2010-242 species, 2011-245 species, 2012-242 species, 2013-251
    species, 2014-240 species, 2015-227
    
    ***79 KNOWN PARTICIPANTS: Liga Auzins, Bob Barnes, John Birsner, Gordon
    Black, Jeb Blain, Jana
    Borba, Sherry
    Brubaker, Brenda Burnett, Dan Burnett, Al Caetano, Cindy Caetano, Encar
    Card, Daisy Carillo, Jeff Cartier, Barbara Castle, Susan Castle, Bill
    Cooper, Melissa Dabulamanzi, Jeff
    Davis, Mary Dufrain, Mike Duncan, Madi Elsea, Kevin Fahey, Laura Fahey,
    Jon
    Feenstra, Gary File, Ernie
    Flores, Joe Fontaine, Kristi Frick, Terri Gallion, Bruce Garlinger,
    Gail Gewain,
    Darrin Heindel, Greg Homel, Andy
    Honig, Louise
    Knecht,
    Sandy Koonce, Debby Kroeger, Brenda Kyle, Ken
    Kyle, Denise LaBerteaux, Megan Lundin, Penny LaPone, Rod Lee, Kelli
    Levinson, John Lockhart, Harry
    Love, Andy
    Lundin, Bill Lydecker, Wayne Martin, Judy Matsuoka, Terri Middlemiss,
    Bill Moffat,
    Jean Moore, Chuck
    Noble, Bob Parker, Landon Peppel, Nancy
    Robinson, Erik Schoenborn, Adam Searcy,
    Deb See, Alison Sheehey, Mark Stacy,
    Jenna Stanek, John Stanek,
    Bob Steele, Susan
    Steele, John Sterling, Steve Summers, Lee Sutton, Shirley Sutton,
    Alexia Svejda, Nadia
    Svejda, Al Tapia, Linda Vasquez, Barb Walls, Mary Whitfield, Marcia
    Wolfe, Tom
    Wurster. Kerncrest
    Audubon Society Bird-A-Thon. Southern Sierra Research Station staff
    (Jenna Stanek, John Stanek, Mary Whitfield). Wind Wolves Preserve staff
    (Jana
    Borba, Daisy Carrillio, Melissa Dabulamanzi, Megan
    Lundin,
    Landon
    Peppel,
    Erik
    Schoenborn, Linda Vasquez),...THANK
    YOU
    TO
    US
    ALL!!!!!!!
    
    Serving as the Messenger for Participants,
    
    Bob
    
    Bob Barnes, Ridgecrest, Kern County, California
    
    Cell: 760-382-1260 
  16. -back to top-
  17. Bird Identification LINK
    DATE: Jun 25, 2014, 4 year(s) ago
    Hello,
    
    I live in rural Santa Cruz county, and I thought it would be fun to begin documenting the many birds that are in the area. I am just getting started, and I am definitely a newbie! I just joined this group today, and I am enjoying reading the archives.
    
    I was hoping that I could start by asking for help to identfy the following bird:
    
    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/CALBIRDS/photos/albums/955188222/lightbox/1847994769#zax/1812855041
    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/CALBIRDS/photos/albums/955188222/lightbox/1847994769#zax/1847994769
    
    This picture is a little obstructed - the bird wouldn't sit still!
    
    I believe this to be a Hooded Oriole but, from my reading, I may be a little too far north for it.
    
    Thanks for your help, and thanks for this group!
    
    Kevin Miller
    Santa Cruz County, CA
    
    
  18. -back to top-
  19. California Towhee at my feeder NOW! LINK
    DATE: Apr 1, 2014 @ 1:32pm, 4 year(s) ago
    Today I saw my FOAP white puffy clouds and ate my FOS ham-and-cheese
    croissant. But after seeing yet more Hooded Orioles, the most excitement
    was posting
    my 1,034 unedited FOAM photos of the towhee on my website
    (www.boremetotears.org), with other shots to follow this PM.
    
    
  20. -back to top-
  21. early spring migrants (and "inland" Heermann's) LINK
    DATE: Mar 25, 2014 @ 7:11pm, 4 year(s) ago
    Today, Monday the 24th, there was an adult Heermann's Gull "INLAND" on
    Sweetwater Reservoir; they are casual even 'just' this far in from the
    coast.
    
    Also today, visiting birders Doug Gochfeld et al. report all 3 CLARK'S
    NUTCRACKERS and one LEWIS'S WOODPECKER continuing in the Laguna Meadows
    area off Sunrise Highway. No luck with Williamson's Sapsuckers or
    Cassin's Finches.
    
    Here are some brief thoughts on some early arriving spring migrants--not
    only here in San Diego County, but also in much of California--including
    Black-headed Grosbeaks, Hooded Orioles, etc.:
    Black-headed Grosbeaks have been reported now for over a week on various
    CA listserves. Hooded Orioles started arriving already in extreme s. CA
    in late February and soon spread north. Bullock's Orioles and Western
    Kingbirds were present already in early March. Reports (FOS) statewide
    of these species keep coming in and coming in and coming in, even though
    they have already been present in most areas for some time. Some
    hummingbirds appeared to have arrived on the early side this year, with
    record-early Black-chinneds in se. CA already in late Feb and several
    early individuals along the southern CA coast earlier this month, and
    one of the earliest-ever Calliopes in San Diego County earlier this
    month as well. So, things seem to be running a bit on the early side in
    2014, at least so far and for at least a few species.
    
    --Paul Lehman, San Diego
    
    
  22. -back to top-
  23. Hummers and Hooded Orioles LINK
    DATE: Aug 31, 2013 @ 12:40pm, 5 year(s) ago
    Thank you all for your info.  I do clean my hummer feeders every time I fill them and I do make my own nectar.  No red dye.  Was wondering if I was stopping them from migrating to somewhere-San Diego.  
    
    Does anyone know anything about "Hooded Orioles" I believe that is what I have.  The Male, very dark yellow doesn't come around anymore but I have 5 females, they are the green/yellowish color.  I'm wondering if the youngsters are brown like a sparrow only with a very long tail. I have one visiting the hummer feeder (which I did bore the holes bigger to accommodate them)  They turn green as they mature and the males turn yellow.    One of the green birds has black on the under throat, I'm wondering if this is a male and will turn yellow.   
    Oh also I'm Jo Ann, Robert (Bob) is my husband (he pays the bills)
     
    Jo Ann Bloomquist
    Arcadia, CA
  24. -back to top-
  25. Farallones update, 8/17 - 8/23 LINK
    DATE: Aug 24, 2013 @ 7:57pm, 5 year(s) ago
    Greetings Calbirders. The Farallones Fall season crew for Point Blue
    Conservation Science (formerly PRBO Conservation Science) arrived on Southeast
    Farallon Island last Saturday, August 17th.
    
    Weather was fairly good in the middle of the week for migrant landbirds, with
    light southerly winds and high overcast. Some highlights from the last week
    include:
    
    BULLER'S SHEARWATER
    NORTHERN GANNET
    YELLOW-HEADED BLACKBIRD
    BLUE-GRAY GNATCATCHER
    PHAINOPEPLA
    TENNESSEE WARBLER
    NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH
    HOODED ORIOLE
    
    Decent numbers of BULLER'S SHEARWATERS have been passing by the island over the
    past 2 days. A high count of 26 were seen yesterday (8/23) during sea watches.
    
    The NORTHERN GANNET was seen nearly every day last week, as long as the
    visibility was far enough for views of Sugarlloaf at the north end of the
    island.
    
    One YELLOW-HEADED BLACKBIRD spent three days on the island (Tues-Thurs).
    
    We banded one BLUE-GRAY GNATCATCHER on wednesday.
    
    A male PHAINOPEPLA on wednesday was only the 7th island record. It was our
    earliest Fall record, and the first since November of 2000.
    
    One TENNESSEE WARBLER was banded on Thursday.
    
    A very early NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH was found yesterday. Hopefully the next
    waterthrush we see will be of the louisiana variety.
    
    A surprisingly rare bird on SEFi, one HOODED ORIOLE was found on Thursday and
    banded.
    
    To see photos of some of the birds in this report, or to learn more about the
    islands, visit the PRBO Conservation Science Farallones blog:
    
    (updated frequently), or just for photos, visit my
    picasa web album:
    
    Cheers and good birding,
    
    Dan Maxwell, Nora Livingston, and Jim Tietz
    Southeast Farallon Island
    San Francisco, CA
  26. -back to top-
  27. California Bird Tips? From Canada LINK
    DATE: Apr 25, 2013 @ 7:23pm, 5 year(s) ago
    I am a birder/field ornithologist from Canada coming to San Fransisco Bay
    tomorrow, and I will have a couple days for birding, one on the coast, and one
    for the interior, i.e Sacramento, San Joaquin
    
    I am experienced in Canadian birding, but I have not birded California at all
    yet. So maybe a third of the species will be lifers.
    
    I am looking for the best places to efficiently spot the following species:
    
    I am thinking I should check out some spots on the coast, and then head inland.
    Please advise me of the best regions/spots for these targets.
    
    Raptor/Owl/Nightjar:
    
    White-tailed Kite
    Red-Shouldered Hawk
    Praire Falcon
    Flammulated Owl
    Common Poorwill (where, & what time of day)
    Lesser Nighthawk (where & what time)
    
    Woodpecker: Acorn & Nuttall's
    
    Allen's Hummingbird
    Mountain Quail
    
    California Thrasher & Towhee
    Oak Titmouse
    Wrentit
    Ash-throated Flycatcher & Black Phoebe
    Icterid: Great-tailed Grackle, Tricolored Blackbird, Hooded Oriole
    
    Sparrow (Sage, Black-throated, Black-chinned, Rufous-winged & Grasshopper)
    
    Greater Roadrunner
    Blue Grosbeak
    Phainopepla
    Yellow-billed Magpie
    Loggerhead Shrike
    White-faced Ibis
    
    California Least Tern, Black Skimmer, Snowy Plover
    Clapper Rail, Black Rail, Yellow Rail & Common Moorhen
    
    Goldfinch (Lesser, Lawrence's)
    Yellow-breasted Chat
    Nashville Warbler
    Hermit Warbler
    
    Extras Cassin's Kingbird & Costa's Hummingbird (Not sure if I can get this
    without heading south of San Francisco/parallell inland areas)
    
    Also, should I be looking for Sage Thrasher this time of year If so, what
    locations
    
    Thank you very much,
    
    Christopher Mark Stephens,
    Parksville, British Columbia, Canada
    Birding Tour Leader, Pacific Rainforest Tours
  28. -back to top-
  29. Fw: [sbcobirding] Hooded Orioles[and Gray Hawk] LINK
    DATE: Mar 14, 2013 @ 4:29am, 5 year(s) ago
    Note in the email below the mention of the Gray Hawk being seen today.
     
    Dave Compton
    Santa Barbara
    
    ----- Forwarded Message -----
    From: Eric Culbs
    To: SBCO Birding
    Sent: Wednesday, March 13, 2013 7:31 PM
    Subject: [sbcobirding] Hooded Orioles
    
    March 13
    Two adult male in my yard here in Carpinteria this morning.
    
    For those interested, Larry Ballard reports the GRAY HAWK still in Carpinteria
    as of 11am or so today.
    
    Eric Culbertson
    Carpinteria
    
    
  30. -back to top-


-revision history-
v1.30 - 01/05/16 - Revamped cloud logic, optimized database queries, linked to eBird rarities.
v1.23 - 12/08/11 - Added direct link to CBRC records.
v1.22 - 12/03/11 - Corrected GMT offsets on dates. Added last 5 posts at top.
v1.21 - 11/24/11 - Added direct link to range map for NA birds.
v1.2  - 11/23/11 - Greatly improved graphing technology - separates month vs. year by posts. Added species auto-complete functionality.
v1.14 - 11/22/11 - Added cloud bubble for common thread topics.
v1.13 - 11/22/11 - Added integrated photos where available.
v1.12 - 11/22/11 - Added multiple input boxes for additional refinement, negative search criteria (eg. -keyword).
v1.11 - 11/22/11 - Added banding code, species look-up. Also direct link to recent eBird observations.
 v1.1 - 11/22/11 - Added 'date' functionality. Shows top 'month/year' combinations for a query. Restrict results to that 'month/year'.
 v1.0 - 11/21/11 - Initial version coded. Currently archiving 'lacobirds' and 'calbirds'.