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 Jul, 2008 - 3 e-mail(s)...




   Hawaiian Petrel (Pterodroma sandwichensis) - HAPE (recent eBird sightings, view CBRC records)

  1. JOUANIN'S PETREL: A FIRST RECORD FOR NORTH AMERICA LINK
    DATE: Apr 11, 2018 @ 9:05pm, 13 day(s) ago
    Howdy, CalBirders,
    
    JOUANIN’S PETREL: FIRST NORTH AMERICAN RECORD:
    
    Today I learned that the “mystery” petrel briefly observed and photographed during the Saturday, September 12, 2015 Shearwater Journeys’ offshore albacore trip has been accepted by the California Bird Records Committee as a JOUANIN’S PETREL ( Bulweria fallax ). This record represents the first accepted record of this north-west Indian Ocean seabird for North America.
    
    This was a sold out trip accompanied by leaders: Scott Terrill, Linda Terrill, Alex Rinkert, Mary Gustafson, Rick Fournier, and Debi Shearwater. In addition, Will Brooks (a leader) was on board as a “regular” along with his father, Jim Brooks. Expert seabirder, Fabio Olmos from Brazil was on board, along with many keen local and out-of-state seabirders: Cooper Scallan, Doug Koch, Bryan Hix, Paul Fenwick, Chris Hartzell, Hillary White, Peder Svingen, Peter Haines, and others. Our captain this day was John Klusmire whose experience with Debi dates back to the mid-1980’s.
    
    Ace leader, Alex Rinkert, first spotted the petrel and called it a “Bulwer’s Petrel” from the stern of the boat which was a pretty darned good call. As the petrel circled the vessel toward the bow, Scott Terrill and I had a view as it crossed to the other side. However, having seen quite a few Bulwer’s Petrels (including the first record for North America on another of our Monterey Bay trips some years ago), I was immediately convinced that this bird was not a Bulwer’s Petrel, based on size alone. The sighting was in Santa Cruz County, based on using “nearest point of land” and at a depth of only 200 fathoms. This species occurs in shallow waters within its normal range.
    
    It should be noted that an extremely warm water “river” occurred along the north coast, off Santa Cruz and Half Moon Bay during this period. The presence of warm water by itself was not so much a factor, as the fact that it smashed into a front of significantly cold water. It was this frontal zone that produced the food for seabirds. (It’s all about food.) Indeed, only 3 days later, we found a WHITE-CHINNED PETREL on our September 15, 2015 Half Moon Bay trip. That petrel flew in and sat on the water for 45 minutes— birders seemed to become bored with it!
    
    Much discussion ensued following the sighting of the September 12 petrel. Eventually, Scott Terrill and I put together all of the details we could muster— including many (not-so-great) photos which became known as “the petrel package.” This was circulated to some of the top world seabirders. David Ainley, Peter Harrison and Hadoram Shirihai responded independently and immediately that they judged the petrel to be a JOUANIN’S PETREL!
    
    Finally, the package went to the CBRC and they made a concurring diagnosis. Of course, any first record for North America requires a laborious vetting, but especially so with seabirds which often present the most fleeting of views.
    
    So, although we had a very good number of images, I would not particularly call any of them “great.” I will try to put up a post on my blog with some of these images. I will post about that when it becomes available.
    
    Subsequent to our first record, nine months later (June 2016) a petrel captured during mist netting at Santa Cruz Island (southern California) was identified as a Jouanin’s Petrel. It may or may not have been the same individual we saw in September 2015.
    
    Jouanin’s Petrel occurs widely offshore in the Arabian Sea and Gulfs of Aden and Oman, where it is the commonest pelagic seabird. It has showed up as a vagrant off Australia, Kenya, Seychelles, Saudi Arabia, and other places. BirdLife lists this species as Near Threatened. There are about 4 records for Hawaii.
    
    If you’d like to read an interesting and fun tale about Jouanin’s Petrels, I recommend this article by my friend, Bob Flood:
    http://www.rarebirdalert.co.uk/v2/Content/Scilly_Pelagics_Jouanins_Petrels.aspxs_id=746315633
    
    HISTORY OF OFFSHORE MONTEREY ALBACORE TRIPS:
    
    The “albacore, offshore Monterey” pelagic trip was invented by Debi Shearwater back in 1983. During the 1980’s albacore, a type of tuna, regularly occurred off Monterey Bay. Reports from fishermen of incredible seabird activity prompted me to begin offering these 12 hour trips. The purpose of this trip was to present a wholistic approach to enjoying marine life. To that end, we endeavored to search for key seabirds, including Craveri’s, Scripps’s, and Guadalupe Murrelets; blue and Baird’s Beaked whales; and to catch albacore, the “cadillac” of the tunas. We never dreamed these trips would turn out to produce so many incredible seabird records. Even though the albacore changed their migration pattern and rarely occur off Monterey nowadays, we continue to operate albacore trips. These trips always sell out in advance.
    
    Other rare, or very uncommon seabirds we have discovered on Shearwater Journeys’ past albacore trips have included: Laysan Albatross; Cook’s and Hawaiian Petrels; Streaked, Flesh-footed, Greater, and Manx Shearwaters; Least and Leach’s Storm-Petrels; Red-billed and Red-tailed Tropicbirds; Brown Booby; Craveri’s, Scripps’s, and Guadalupe Murrelets. This is a spectacular trip for jaegers, often encountering over 100 in one day! We almost always have a “grand slam” on Pomarine, Parasitic, and Long-tailed Jaegers, Long-tailed being the most commonly sighted. It is the single best trip to see South Polar Skua.
    
    Our September 9, 2017 Albacore trip indeed found all of the jaegers, South Polar Skua; Guadalupe, Scripps’s, and Craveri’s Murrelets, and many of the “regular” fall species. Northern Waterthrush and American Redstart were “bonus” birds.
    
    OUR UPCOMING ALBACORE: OFFSHORE MONTEREY TRIPS:
    SUN. SEP. 9
    SAT. SEP. 15
    
    See our complete schedule for 2018:
    http://www.shearwaterjourneys.com/schedule.html
    
    Past trip reports:
    Oct. 6, 2001 with STREAKED SHEARWATER and Black-throated Gray Warbler:
    http://www.shearwaterjourneys.com/ag011006.html
    Sep. 15, 2002 with 42 LONG-TAILED JAEGERS and murrelets:
    http://www.shearwaterjourneys.com/020913.html
    Sep. 10, 2006 with ten FLESH-FOOTED SHEARWATERS and 1500+ Buller’s Shearwaters:
    http://www.shearwaterjourneys.com/ag060910.htm
    Sep. 13, 2008 with 7000 ASHY STORM-PETRELS:
    http://shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com/2008/09/shearwater-birthday-birding-sep-13-2008.html
    Sep. 12, 2009 with 24 COOK’S PETRELS and one HAWAIIAN PETREL:
    http://shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com/2009/09/trip-report-sep-12-2009-monterey.html
    
    I gratefully thank all of the leaders and especially, the participants from near and far —representing 14 different states in the USA and Canada and Brazil. Without you , the participants, we have nothing. Special thanks to the many photographers on board who sent their images, and to the reviewers who worked on this amazing record.
    
    Now check that box!
    What’s next
    Still discovering first North American records after 40 years of trips!
    Debi Shearwater
    
    DEBRA SHEARWATER
    Shearwater Journeys, Inc.
    PO Box 190
    Hollister, CA 95024
    831.637.8527
    debi@...
    www.shearwaterjourneys.com
    www.shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com
    
    Celebrating 43 Years of Seabirding with Shearwater Journeys
  2. -back to top-
  3. JOUANIN'S PETREL: A FIRST RECORD FOR NORTH AMERICA LINK
    DATE: Apr 11, 2018 @ 9:04pm, 13 day(s) ago
    Howdy, CalBirders,
    
    JOUANIN’S PETREL: FIRST NORTH AMERICAN RECORD:
    
    Today I learned that the “mystery” petrel briefly observed and photographed during the Saturday, September 12, 2015 Shearwater Journeys’ offshore albacore trip has been accepted by the California Bird Records Committee as a JOUANIN’S PETREL ( Bulweria fallax ). This record represents the first accepted record of this north-west Indian Ocean seabird for North America.
    
    This was a sold out trip accompanied by leaders: Scott Terrill, Linda Terrill, Alex Rinkert, Mary Gustafson, Rick Fournier, and Debi Shearwater. In addition, Will Brooks (a leader) was on board as a “regular” along with his father, Jim Brooks. Expert seabirder, Fabio Olmos from Brazil was on board, along with many keen local and out-of-state seabirders: Cooper Scallan, Doug Koch, Bryan Hix, Paul Fenwick, Chris Hartzell, Hillary White, Peder Svingen, Peter Haines, and others. Our captain this day was John Klusmire whose experience with Debi dates back to the mid-1980’s.
    
    Ace leader, Alex Rinkert, first spotted the petrel and called it a “Bulwer’s Petrel” from the stern of the boat which was a pretty darned good call. As the petrel circled the vessel toward the bow, Scott Terrill and I had a view as it crossed to the other side. However, having seen quite a few Bulwer’s Petrels (including the first record for North America on another of our Monterey Bay trips some years ago), I was immediately convinced that this bird was not a Bulwer’s Petrel, based on size alone. The sighting was in Santa Cruz County, based on using “nearest point of land” and at a depth of only 200 fathoms. This species occurs in shallow waters within its normal range.
    
    It should be noted that an extremely warm water “river” occurred along the north coast, off Santa Cruz and Half Moon Bay during this period. The presence of warm water by itself was not so much a factor, as the fact that it smashed into a front of significantly cold water. It was this frontal zone that produced the food for seabirds. (It’s all about food.) Indeed, only 3 days later, we found a WHITE-CHINNED PETREL on our September 15, 2015 Half Moon Bay trip. That petrel flew in and sat on the water for 45 minutes— birders seemed to become bored with it!
    
    Much discussion ensued following the sighting of the September 12 petrel. Eventually, Scott Terrill and I put together all of the details we could muster— including many (not-so-great) photos which became known as “the petrel package.” This was circulated to some of the top world seabirders. David Ainley, Peter Harrison and Hadoram Shirihai responded independently and immediately that they judged the petrel to be a JOUANIN’S PETREL!
    
    Finally, the package went to the CBRC and they made a concurring diagnosis. Of course, any first record for North America requires a laborious vetting, but especially so with seabirds which often present the most fleeting of views.
    
    So, although we had a very good number of images, I would not particularly call any of them “great.” I will try to put up a post on my blog with some of these images. I will post about that when it becomes available.
    
    Subsequent to our first record, nine months later (June 2016) a petrel captured during mist netting at Santa Cruz Island (southern California) was identified as a Jouanin’s Petrel. It may or may not have been the same individual we saw in September 2015.
    
    Jouanin’s Petrel occurs widely offshore in the Arabian Sea and Gulfs of Aden and Oman, where it is the commonest pelagic seabird. It has showed up as a vagrant off Australia, Kenya, Seychelles, Saudi Arabia, and other places. BirdLife lists this species as Near Threatened. There are about 4 records for Hawaii.
    
    If you’d like to read an interesting and fun tale about Jouanin’s Petrels, I recommend this article by my friend, Bob Flood:
    http://www.rarebirdalert.co.uk/v2/Content/Scilly_Pelagics_Jouanins_Petrels.aspxs_id=746315633
    
    HISTORY OF OFFSHORE MONTEREY ALBACORE TRIPS:
    
    The “albacore, offshore Monterey” pelagic trip was invented by Debi Shearwater back in 1983. During the 1980’s albacore, a type of tuna, regularly occurred off Monterey Bay. Reports from fishermen of incredible seabird activity prompted me to begin offering these 12 hour trips. The purpose of this trip was to present a wholistic approach to enjoying marine life. To that end, we endeavored to search for key seabirds, including Craveri’s, Scripps’s, and Guadalupe Murrelets; blue and Baird’s Beaked whales; and to catch albacore, the “cadillac” of the tunas. We never dreamed these trips would turn out to produce so many incredible seabird records. Even though the albacore changed their migration pattern and rarely occur off Monterey nowadays, we continue to operate albacore trips. These trips always sell out in advance.
    
    Other rare, or very uncommon seabirds we have discovered on Shearwater Journeys’ past albacore trips have included: Laysan Albatross; Cook’s and Hawaiian Petrels; Streaked, Flesh-footed, Greater, and Manx Shearwaters; Least and Leach’s Storm-Petrels; Red-billed and Red-tailed Tropicbirds; Brown Booby; Craveri’s, Scripps’s, and Guadalupe Murrelets. This is a spectacular trip for jaegers, often encountering over 100 in one day! We almost always have a “grand slam” on Pomarine, Parasitic, and Long-tailed Jaegers, Long-tailed being the most commonly sighted. It is the single best trip to see South Polar Skua.
    
    Our September 9, 2017 Albacore trip indeed found all of the jaegers, South Polar Skua; Guadalupe, Scripps’s, and Craveri’s Murrelets, and many of the “regular” fall species. Northern Waterthrush and American Redstart were “bonus” birds.
    
    OUR UPCOMING ALBACORE: OFFSHORE MONTEREY TRIPS:
    SUN. SEP. 9
    SAT. SEP. 15
    
    See our complete schedule for 2018:
    http://www.shearwaterjourneys.com/schedule.html
    
    Past trip reports:
    Oct. 6, 2001 with STREAKED SHEARWATER and Black-throated Gray Warbler:
    http://www.shearwaterjourneys.com/ag011006.html
    Sep. 15, 2002 with 42 LONG-TAILED JAEGERS and murrelets:
    http://www.shearwaterjourneys.com/020913.html
    Sep. 10, 2006 with ten FLESH-FOOTED SHEARWATERS and 1500+ Buller’s Shearwaters:
    http://www.shearwaterjourneys.com/ag060910.htm
    Sep. 13, 2008 with 7000 ASHY STORM-PETRELS:
    http://shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com/2008/09/shearwater-birthday-birding-sep-13-2008.html
    Sep. 12, 2009 with 24 COOK’S PETRELS and one HAWAIIAN PETREL:
    http://shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com/2009/09/trip-report-sep-12-2009-monterey.html
    
    I gratefully thank all of the leaders and especially, the participants from near and far —representing 14 different states in the USA and Canada and Brazil. Without you , the participants, we have nothing. Special thanks to the many photographers on board who sent their images, and to the reviewers who worked on this amazing record.
    
    Now check that box!
    What’s next
    Still discovering first North American records after 40 years of trips!
    Debi Shearwater
    
    DEBRA SHEARWATER
    Shearwater Journeys, Inc.
    PO Box 190
    Hollister, CA 95024
    831.637.8527
    debi@...
    www.shearwaterjourneys.com
    www.shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com
    
    Celebrating 43 Years of Seabirding with Shearwater Journeys
  4. -back to top-
  5. HAWAIIAN PETREL: MONTEREY BAY LINK
    DATE: Aug 26, 2017, 8 month(s) ago
    Howdy, Birders,
    
    Shearwater Journeys’ August 25th Monterey Bay pelagic trip enjoyed an exquisite flight display of a solitary HAWAIIAN PETREL which was found and immediately identified by ace leader, Alex Rinkert. The petrel put on quite a show, sauntering in and out of the wake, rising high on the waves. Everyone on board had excellent views. Many photographs were taken. This petrel was observed in Monterey County.
    
    You can see some of Beth Hamel’s images here:
    http://shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com/2017/08/hawaiian-petrel-monterey-bay-august-25.html
    
    Also, images by Dave and Tammy McQuade here:
    http://shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com/2017/08/hawaiian-petrel-images-by-dave-tammy.html
    
    Other trip highlights included great views of BLACK-FOOTED ALBATROSS; NORTHERN FULMAR; BULLER’S, SOOTY, and PINK-FOOTED SHEARWATERS; one ASHY STORM-PETREL; a grand slam on the jaegers: POMARINE, PARASITIC, and LONG-TAILED; SABINE’S GULL; RHINOCEROS and CASSIN’S AUKLETS.
    
    We encountered 13 humpback whales, and capped off the end of the day with several BLUE WHALES.
    
    You can find a full trip report with images and full checklist, here:
    http://shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com/2017/08/monterey-bay-pelagic-trip-august-25-2017.html
    
    Many thanks to the wonderful group of birders who joined us from near and far, as well as three of the folks doing a ABA Big Year! Hawaiian Petrel was a life bird for many on board. Finally, I thank the loyal leaders: Alex Rinkert, Jim Holmes, Clay Kempf, and Rick Fournier.
    
    Looking for something to do on Labor Day Weekend We have trips on September 1 departing from Monterey and September 2 and 3 departing from Half Moon Bay. For a reservation, email me: debi@... .
    
    Living the Salt Life & SeaBirding for Science,
    Debi Shearwater
    
    DEBRA SHEARWATER
    Shearwater Journeys, Inc.
    PO Box 190
    Hollister, CA 95024
    831.637.8527
    debi@...
    www.shearwaterjourneys.com
    www.shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com
    
    Celebrating 42 Years of Seabirding with Shearwater Journeys
  6. -back to top-
  7. Another Cook's Petrel Year? LINK
    DATE: Jul 20, 2017 @ 8:06pm, 9 month(s) ago
    Howdy, Seabirders,
    
    Dave Pereksta’s awesome pelagic trip report from Ventura, July 16th, has many of us scratching our head’s and asking: Could this year be another COOK’S PETREL year similar to 2009
    
    In 2009, unprecedented numbers of COOK’S PETRELS were seen close to shore. It began in SoCal, but on Shearwater Journeys’ July 31, 2009 Monterey Bay pelagic trip, we also recorded a record 138 Cook’s petrels. The first sightings were only 13.3 miles offshore, Monterey. We haven’t see Cook’s Petrels like we did in 2009 since — think about that!
    
    I fully intend to put in a good search for Cook’s Petrels, and Hawaiian Petrels, too, on our upcoming trips. During this time period in 2009, a Stejneger’s Petrel and Short-tailed Albatross were also seen. We found a SHORT-TAILED ALBATROSS on our September 16, 2009 trip, as well.
    
    Here’s our program of trips: Spaces are available on all trips, except as noted below.
    
    MONTEREY: August 4* & 25*; September 1*, 7, 8, 10, 22, 23, 24, 30; October 8.
    Monterey trips run from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. *Trips may be extended an hour or so to search for petrels.
    
    ALBACORE GROUNDS: OFFSHORE MONTEREY: September 9: 5:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. (Limited spaces available)
    
    FARALLON ISLANDS: August 6 & 13 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m
    
    HALF MOON BAY: August 12 (one space available); September 2, 3, 15, 16; October 7.
    
    Please see our web site for more information:
    http://www.shearwaterjourneys.com/schedule.html
    
    To read more about the Cook’s Petrel Invasion of 2009, please see these reports:
    http://shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com/2009/08/monterey-bay-cooks-july-31-2009-story.html
    http://shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com/2009/08/short-tailed-albatross-july-30-2009.html
    http://shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com/2009/08/captain-cooks-petrels-rage-on.html
    http://shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com/2009/08/august-6-2009-cooks-petrel-chase-trip.html
    Cook’s Petrels off Point Pinos:
    http://shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com/2009/08/monterey-bay-nearshore-cooks-petrels.html
    
    Short-tailed Albatross seen on Shearwater Journeys’ September 16, 2009 trip:
    http://shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com/2009/09/sep-16-2009-trip-report-steller-day.html
    
    Farallon Islands reports:
    http://shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com/2009/08/farallon-islands-aug-2-2009-awesome-day.html
    http://shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com/2014/07/tufted-puffins-golden-gate-bridge.html
    
    About the Albacore Trip:
    http://shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com/2015/07/about-albacore-offshore-monterey-trip.html
    
    We shall be covering many Monterey, Santa Cruz, San Mateo, and San Francisco Counties offshore.
    
    One thing is for certain— there is an awful lot of food out there, even nearshore. Spotters on the Farallon Islands, counted over 250 whales in one day. There’s krill and schooling fish, everywhere, it seems. It couldn’t be better! Many folks hesitated to jump on board for the Cook’s Petrels trips in ’09 and regretted that later. August seems to be the best month, although early September could be good, too. Escape the heat and enjoy a cooling, salty breeze!
    
    As many have heard me say, “It’s all about food.”
    Living the Salt Life on this side of the Pacific now,
    Debi
    
    DEBRA SHEARWATER
    Shearwater Journeys, Inc.
    PO Box 190
    Hollister, CA 95024
    831.637.8527
    debi@...
    www.shearwaterjourneys.com
    www.shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com
    
    Celebrating 42 Years of Seabirding with Shearwater Journeys
  8. -back to top-
  9. cruise pelagic 3 May: 5 Hawaiians, 7 Murphy's, 2 Laysans LINK
    DATE: May 4, 2017 @ 5:08am, 12 month(s) ago
    A cruise-ship pelagic with ca. 20 birders aboard the "Coral Princess"
    
    between Los Angeles and Vancouver was between southern Monterey and
    
    central Mendocino Counties on 3 May. Highlights included:
    
    HAWAIIAN PETREL: total of 5, with excellent views and photos (1 San
    
    Mateo, 2 San Francisco, 2 Mendocino)
    
    MURPHY'S PETREL: total of at least 7, ditto views/photos (1 Monterey, 2
    
    San Francisco, 1 Marin, 3 Mendocino)
    
    LAYSAN ALBATROSS: total of 2 (San Mateo, Mendocino)
    
    But zero Cook's Petrels, following two April cruises with moderate
    
    numbers in virtually every county traversed during daylight.
    
    Also, a flock of 7 Arctic Terns in Monterey and still good numbers for
    
    spring of both Fork-tailed and Leach's Storm-Petrels along most of route.
    
    Lost a few hours of the day to dense fog, mostly in AM.
    
    Paul Lehman, San Diego
  10. -back to top-
  11. April 23-24 cruise-ship off CA: 3 HAWAIIAN, 21 MURPHY'S, 38 COOK'S PETREL; 3 LAYSAN; FORK-TAILED STORM-PETREL incursion LINK
    DATE: Apr 24, 2017 @ 11:43am, 12 month(s) ago
    A Holland America "repositioning" cruise from San Diego to Vancouver,
    
    departing 22 April with some 30 birders on board, was off central
    
    California on 23 April and off northwest California for part of 24
    
    April. Highlights included:
    
    23 April (fair, windy):
    3 Hawaiian Petrel (1 SLO, 2 SF)
    
    4 Murphy's Petrel (4 SF)
    37 Cook's Petrel (8 SBA, 17 SLO, 5 MTY, 2 SM, 5 SF)
    
    38 Fork-tailed Storm-Petrel including 4 in SLO where they are rare; good numbers in all other countries.
    2 Laysan Albatross (MTY)
    1 Long-tailed Jaeger (SF)
    
    24 April (overcast); morning only before reaching Oregon:
    HUM: 1 Cook's, 11 Murphy's, 1 Laysan, 1 LT Jaeger
    DN: 6 Murphy's
    
    --Paul Lehman (and Barbara Carlson), San Diego
  12. -back to top-
  13. Pelagic News LINK
    DATE: Sep 22, 2016 @ 6:21am, 2 year(s) ago
    Howdy, CALBirders,
    
    Shearwater Journeys had a wildlife filled pelagic trip September 18th from Half Moon Bay covering both San Mateo and San Francisco Counties. Highlights were many: BLACK-FOOTED ALBATROSS; NORTHERN/PACIFIC FULMAR; PINK-FOOTED, BULLER’S and SOOTY SHEARWATERS; one good view of a WILSON’S STORM-PETREL and 53 ASHY STORM-PETRELS; the NORTHERN GANNET was on sail rock; 165 SABINE’S GULLS; ARCTIC and COMMON TERNS; COMMON MURRE, CASSIN’S and RHINOCEROS AUKLETS; one TUFTED PUFFIN. A Hawaiian Petrel was called out on the trip, but due to short, distant views by only a couple (excellent) birders on the trip, we have decided not to include this species on the list. The Black-vented Shearwaters either continued north along the coast (but no reports from shore), or did a U-turn and went south. Monterey Bay still had a few when we were last out.
    
    The cetacean show was outstanding: 5 BLUE WHALES; 45 HUMPBACK WHALES; 5 COMMON DOLPHINS and 10 DALL’S PORPOISES. The feeding whales were quite amazing! Still lots of food around.
    DEBRA SHEARWATER
    
    Our next trip departing from Half Moon Bay is OCTOBER 2 with Steve Tucker, Jim Holmes, Steve Hampton and Debi Shearwater co-leading. This weekend, we have trips departing from Monterey on SEPTEMBER 23, 24, 25. Spaces are available on all trips. I can be reached by email: debi@...
    
    Living the Salt Life,
    Debi Shearwater
    
    Shearwater Journeys, Inc.
    PO Box 190
    Hollister, CA 95024
    831.637.8527
    debi@...
    www.shearwaterjourneys.com
    www.shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com
  14. -back to top-
  15. deepwater cruise 5/12 off nw CA & OR: 2 Hawaiians, 4 Murphy's, 2 Laysans LINK
    DATE: May 13, 2016 @ 4:57am, 2 year(s) ago
    On 12 May, a group of birders were aboard the Grand Princess on the
    
    first full day of our San Francisco to southeast Alaska and back
    
    round-trip. This cruise goes direct from SF to Juneau, thus goes through
    
    deep, very offshore waters--to the tune of 200 miles out off northern
    
    OR, WA, and s. BC. The day started at dawn already 45 miles off Arcata
    
    and quickly headed NW even farther offshore and entered OR waters just
    
    two hours later. Much of the time spent way off Oregon is over level
    
    "abyssal plain" waters, so overall diversity and numbers (except for the
    
    ubiquitous Leach's Storm-Petel) is often--but not always--fairly
    
    limited. Species seen in numbers closer to shore can be pretty scarce
    
    this far out. Totals for the day were as follows:
    
    LAYSAN ALBATROSS: 2+ (off Curry/Coos Cos., OR)
    
    Black-footed Albatross: 19
    
    Northern Fulmar: 1
    
    MURPHY'S PETREL: 4 (2 Del Norte, 2 Curry)
    
    HAWAIIAN PETREL: 2 (both Curry; about 75 miles offshore)
    
    Pink-footed Shearwater: 3
    
    Sooty Shearwater: 63
    
    Fork-tailed Storm-Petrel: 1
    
    Leach's Storm-Petrel: 545
    
    Red-necked Phalarope: 3
    
    Pomarine Jaeger: 1
    
    Parasitic Jaeger: 10 (all adults; perhaps a surprisingly high total
    
    this far offshore, with birds out to 140 miles)
    
    Common Murre: 2
    
    Rhinoceros Auklet: 5
    
    Herring Gull: 1 (105 miles out)
    
    Eurasian Collared-Dove: 5 (go! go! go!)
    
    Savannah Sparrow: 1
    
    --PAUL LEHMAN, San Diego
  16. -back to top-
  17. Pelagic Cruise Results -- 4-5 May California and Oregon LINK
    DATE: May 8, 2016 @ 7:37am, 2 year(s) ago
    Hi Birders,
    
    About 28 birders were aboard the Ruby Princess for 2 days of deep water birding 4-5 May. On the 4th we were off southern Monterey County at daybreak, and ended the day off northern Menodcino County. Conditions started off calm, but ended with blustery north winds and sea fog. On the 5th we started in southern Curry County and our last checklist just barely got into Clatsop County. Conditions were rough, with 50 knot headwinds and big seas. I did eBird checklists every half hour for the two days, and all of those are in now and shared. Highlights were a slug of Pterodroma petrels that included 2 Hawaiian, 32 Cook's, and 18 Murphy's, the majority of which were found beginning in San Francisco County and continuing up through Marin, with scattered Murphy's the second day throughout Oregon. I think I've loaded in all my identifiable photos of these, but still have to load photos of common migrants. Parakeet Auklets were seen by one observer in Oregon waters, and those will be added independently by him since the rest of us missed them. 
    
    Here are some of the highlight checklists:
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S29435292
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S29435309
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S29451212
    
    Trip Summary:
    
    eBird Checklist Summary for: May 4, 2016, 4:20 AM to May 5, 2016, 11:30 PM
    
    Number of Checklists: 53
    Number of Taxa: 41
    
    1 Pacific Loon
    1 Common Loon
    2 loon sp.
    4 Laysan Albatross
    451 Black-footed Albatross
    40 Northern Fulmar
    18 Murphy's Petrel
    2 Hawaiian Petrel
    32 Cook's Petrel
    1 Pterodroma sp.
    136 Pink-footed Shearwater
    3895 Sooty Shearwater
    48 Fork-tailed Storm-Petrel
    402 Leach's Storm-Petrel
    55 Ashy Storm-Petrel
    9 storm-petrel sp.
    4 Dunlin
    30 peep sp.
    24 Short-billed/Long-billed Dowitcher
    452 Red-necked Phalarope
    80 Red Phalarope
    59 phalarope sp.
    1 shorebird sp.
    1 South Polar Skua
    12 Pomarine Jaeger
    7 Parasitic Jaeger
    2 Long-tailed Jaeger
    19 jaeger sp.
    165 Common Murre
    71 Cassin's Auklet
    50 Rhinoceros Auklet
    12 alcid sp.
    234 Sabine's Gull
    18 Western Gull
    2 Herring Gull
    1 Glaucous-winged Gull
    6 gull sp. 
    8 Arctic Tern
    2 Common/Arctic Tern
    1 tern sp.
    1 Eurasian Collared-Dove (road the boat for the whole first day)
    
    Checklist Locations:
    Checklists included in this summary:
    (1): 35.7941x-122.1718 - May 4, 2016, 5:57 AM
    Date: May 4, 2016, 5:57 AM
    (2): 35.9275x-122.3139 - May 4, 2016, 6:30 AM
    Date: May 4, 2016, 6:30 AM
    (3): 36.0288x-122.4304 - May 4, 2016, 6:57 AM
    Date: May 4, 2016, 6:57 AM
    (4): 36.1827x-122.5630 - May 4, 2016, 7:33 AM
    Date: May 4, 2016, 7:33 AM
    (5): 36.3443x-122.7072 - May 4, 2016, 8:11 AM
    Date: May 4, 2016, 8:11 AM
    (6): 36.4694x-122.8023 - May 4, 2016, 8:38 AM
    Date: May 4, 2016, 8:38 AM
    (7): 36.5631x-122.8752 - May 4, 2016, 8:58 AM
    Date: May 4, 2016, 8:58 AM
    (8): 36.7546x-123.0254 - May 4, 2016, 9:38 AM
    Date: May 4, 2016, 9:33 AM
    (9): 36.8633x-123.1068 - May 4, 2016, 10:01 AM
    Date: May 4, 2016, 10:01 AM
    (10): 36.9995x-123.2126 - May 4, 2016, 10:29 AM
    Date: May 4, 2016, 10:29 AM
    (11): 37.1376x-123.3179 - May 4, 2016, 10:59 AM
    Date: May 4, 2016, 10:59 AM
    (12): 37.3246x-123.4624 - May 4, 2016, 11:39 AM
    Date: May 4, 2016, 11:30 AM
    (13): 37.5285x-123.6214 - May 4, 2016, 12:22 PM
    Date: May 4, 2016, 12:10 PM
    (14): 37.5847x-123.6652 - May 4, 2016, 12:34 PM
    Date: May 4, 2016, 12:34 PM
    (15): 37.6934x-123.7496 - May 4, 2016, 12:58 PM
    Date: May 4, 2016, 12:58 PM
    (16): 37.9116x-123.8752 - May 4, 2016, 1:41 PM
    Date: May 4, 2016, 1:41 PM
    (17): 38.0271x-123.9324 - May 4, 2016, 2:05 PM
    Date: May 4, 2016, 2:05 PM
    (18): 38.1549x-123.9958 - May 4, 2016, 2:32 PM
    Date: May 4, 2016, 2:32 PM
    (19): 38.2723x-124.0544 - May 4, 2016, 2:57 PM
    Date: May 4, 2016, 2:57 PM
    (20): 38.4158x-124.1262 - May 4, 2016, 3:28 PM
    Date: May 4, 2016, 3:28 PM
    (21): 38.5518x-124.1842 - May 4, 2016, 3:57 PM
    Date: May 4, 2016, 3:57 PM
    (22): 38.6986x-124.2448 - May 4, 2016, 4:27 PM
    Date: May 4, 2016, 4:27 PM
    (23): 38.8920x-124.3226 - May 4, 2016, 5:10 PM
    Date: May 4, 2016, 5:10 PM
    (24): 38.9920x-124.3621 - May 4, 2016, 5:33 PM
    Date: May 4, 2016, 5:33 PM
    (25): 39.1189x-124.4048 - May 4, 2016, 5:59 PM
    Date: May 4, 2016, 5:59 PM
    (26): 39.2764x-124.4532 - May 4, 2016, 6:30 PM
    Date: May 4, 2016, 6:30 PM
    (27): 42.2154x-124.8933 - May 5, 2016, 6:04 AM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 6:00 AM
    (28): 42.3154x-124.9039 - May 5, 2016, 6:30 AM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 6:30 AM
    (29): 42.4338x-124.9123 - May 5, 2016, 7:00 AM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 7:00 AM
    (30): 42.5558x-124.9229 - May 5, 2016, 7:30 AM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 7:30 AM
    (31): 42.6747x-124.9332 - May 5, 2016, 7:59 AM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 7:59 AM
    (32): 42.8072x-124.9431 - May 5, 2016, 8:29 AM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 8:29 AM
    (33): 42.9487x-124.9496 - May 5, 2016, 9:00 AM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 9:00 AM
    (34): 43.0857x-124.9609 - May 5, 2016, 9:30 AM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 9:30 AM
    (35): 43.2335x-124.9702 - May 5, 2016, 10:01 AM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 10:01 AM
    (36): 43.3741x-124.9795 - May 5, 2016, 10:30 AM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 10:30 AM
    (37): 43.5298x-124.9884 - May 5, 2016, 11:00 AM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 11:00 AM
    (38): 43.6834x-125.0002 - May 5, 2016, 11:30 AM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 11:30 AM
    (39): 43.9165x-125.0144 - May 5, 2016, 12:16 PM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 12:16 PM
    (40): 43.9911x-125.0204 - May 5, 2016, 12:31 PM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 12:31 PM
    (41): 44.1383x-125.0325 - May 5, 2016, 1:00 PM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 1:00 PM
    (42): 44.2849x-125.0397 - May 5, 2016, 1:30 PM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 1:30 PM
    (43): 44.4270x-125.0489 - May 5, 2016, 1:58 PM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 1:58 PM
    (44): 44.6066x-125.0613 - May 5, 2016, 2:34 PM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 2:34 PM
    (45): 44.7716x-125.0731 - May 5, 2016, 3:06 PM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 3:00 PM
    (46): 44.8839x-125.0805 - May 5, 2016, 3:28 PM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 3:28 PM
    (47): 45.0362x-125.0932 - May 5, 2016, 3:59 PM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 3:59 PM
    (48): 45.1868x-125.1024 - May 5, 2016, 4:28 PM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 4:28 PM
    (49): 45.3464x-125.1137 - May 5, 2016, 5:01 PM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 5:01 PM
    (50): 45.4737x-125.1217 - May 5, 2016, 5:28 PM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 5:28 PM
    (51): 45.6154x-125.1356 - May 5, 2016, 5:57 PM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 5:57 PM
    (52): 45.7684x-125.1430 - May 5, 2016, 6:29 PM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 6:29 PM
    (53): 45.9707x-125.1587 - May 5, 2016, 7:10 PM
    Date: May 5, 2016, 7:00 PM
    
    This trip summary was created using the eBird app for iPhone and iPad.
    See eBird for more information.
    
    --
    ===========
    Brian L. Sullivan
    
    eBird Project Leader
    www.ebird.org
    
    Photo Editor
    Birds of North America Online
    http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/BNA
    -------------------------------
  18. -back to top-
  19. Repositioning cruise trip report LINK
    DATE: Sep 20, 2015 @ 8:50pm, 3 year(s) ago
    Birders
    We had an interesting repositioning cruise aboard the Ruby Princess from Vancouver to LA this past week. Our route had us positioned about 50 miles off south-central WA at dawn the first day, and we nearly made it to the CA border by nightfall. The next day we started off Mendocino County in California, and ended in southern San Luis Obispo county. Sea/weather conditions were quite windy with rain squalls over WA and OR, but calmer and clearing off CA. Overall there were LOTS of Long-tailed Jaegers, Arctic Terns, and Red Phalaropes out there; I've tried to put up a good cross section of images of these in the checklists below (let me know if I messed up any of the jaegers, there were some weird looking Long-taileds out there!). Tubenose numbers were slim overall, but very good off WA and southern OR, and nearly dead off CA. 
    
    Highlights were a Brown Booby off WA, several Guadalupe Murrelets off CA, and two Wedge-rumped Storm-Petrels off Morro Bay. We had two pterodroma sp. on the trip, both on the first day. One was likely a Hawaiian Petrel and one was a dark bird that could have been something better than a Murphy's, but the sighting was too brief; picked up just before crossing the bow.
    
    I spent some time today fleshing out these eBird checklists with photos. Here are the links to the trip lists for each hour:
    
    15 September
    
    Washington
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S25054412
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S25054403
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S25054397
    
    Oregon
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S25054395
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S25054385
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S25054380
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S25054375
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S25054373
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S25054371
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S25054369
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S25054365
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S25054359
    
    16 September
    
    California
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S25068380
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S25068379
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S25068373
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S25068363
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S25068360
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S25068346
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S25068345
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S25068329
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S25068327
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S25068323
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S25068321
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S25067795
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S25067783
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklistsubID=S25068319
    
    -- ===========Brian L. SullivaneBird Project Leader www.ebird.orgPhoto EditorBirds of North America Onlinehttp://bna.birds.cornell.edu/BNA-------------------------------
    
    
  20. -back to top-
  21. cruise-ship Aug 9th: 2 Hawaiians, 2 Flesh-foots, 68 Buller's, 3 Skuas LINK
    DATE: Aug 10, 2015 @ 5:42am, 3 year(s) ago
    On August 9th, Bruce Rideout and I were on the final leg of our Princess
    round-trip cruise from San Francisco to se. Alaska and back to San
    Francisco and which found us covering the stretch from off central
    Oregon to off southern Humboldt County. This is often a very good day
    for pterodromas, but we were plagued by both a total lack of wind (NOT
    good for petrels) plus periodic long spells of dense fog which wiped out
    fully half the day's birding. Nonetheless, we had a reasonable day. Off
    c. Oregon we did have 2 HAWAIIAN PETRELS (one photo'd), 2 FLESH-FOOTED
    SHEARWATERS, 12 Buller's Shearwaters, and a South Polar Skua. We
    entered California waters in the mid-afternoon but all of Del Norte
    County was obliterated by fog. So, off Humboldt we had a healthy total
    of 56 Buller's Shearwaters, 2 South Polar Skuas, and 11 Long-tailed
    Jaegers, plus an excellent marine mammal show including a group of
    beaked whales (photo'd) and lots of Northern Right Whale Dolphins.
    
    --Paul Lehman, San Diego
    
    
  22. -back to top-
  23. Pelagic Trip News: July 31 & August 2 LINK
    DATE: Aug 4, 2015 @ 9:11pm, 3 year(s) ago
    Howdy, CALBirders,
    Shearwater Journeys just completed the first two pelagic trips of the season. Brief highlights of each trip can be found below. A full trip report with images will be coming this week. Both days, we enjoyed flat, calm seas. Perfect marine conditions.
    
    JULY 31 MONTEREY:
    
    Nearshore cool (58F) water has stacked seabirds up along the coastline. Forty NORTHERN FULMARS seems high for late July, and most were found in the cool water, as were the 3000+ SOOTY SHEARWATERS. We headed south, making it to Yankee Point, then turned offshore where we encountered warm water (61F). Most of the 300+ PINK-FOOTED SHEARWATERS were offshore where the sooty shearwater numbers declined. Carmel Bay had a very large concentration of COMMON MURRE FATHER/CHICK PAIRS (2400). A couple of CASSIN'S AUKLETS and RHINOCEROS AUKLETS were mostly near Carmel Bay. Recently, krill has been reported in this area, along with Blue Whales, although we did not find them. One cool bubble (59F surrounded by 61F) had a nice flock of RED-NECKED and one RED PHALAROPE for comparison. SABINE'S GULLS (24) were offshore along with a good variety of dolphins: SHORT-BEAKED COMMON DOLPHINS, RISSO'S DOLPHINS, PACIFIC WHITE-SIDED DOLPHINS, and DALL'S PORPOISE. Seven HUMPBACK WHALES and 7 OCEAN SUNFISH rounded out the day.
    
    AUGUST 2 HALF MOON BAY:
    
    We could spend half the day in the harbor because there is so much life along all of the jetties: WANDERING TATTLER, BLACK TURNSTONE, SURFBIRDS and BROWN PELICANS (2450); BRANT'S, DOUBLE-CRESTED and PELAGIC CORMORANTS. Saw the semi-resident SEA OTTER that has been hanging out there for several years, just outside the harbor. PIGEON GUILLEMOTS (38) seem to be having a great breeding season. Right along the 28 fathom line we encountered hundreds of SOOTY & PINK-FOOTED SHEARWATERS and FATHER/CHICK COMMON MURRES. Dropping over the edge of the Continental Shelf near the yellow weather buoy, it was no surprise to encounter the first of 31 BLACK-FOOTED ALBATROSS; NORTHERN FULMAR (14). An ARCTIC TERN was spotted, sitting on a log, and another flock of 4 flew by. Our captain spotted a SCRIPPS'S MURRELET (SY) on the water. It never flew, or dived. It also had a deformed beak. (See images in upcoming report). The real surprise of the day was finding flock after flock of STORM-PETRELS! Overall numbers weren't the highest I've seen, but we did break the all-time high California count of WILSON'S STORM-PETREL with 106 counted! FORK-TAILED (750), ASHY (650), BLACK (60) were all in SAN FRANCISCO COUNTY. Apparently, Wilson's Storm-Petrel is not an easy bird to tick in San Francisco County. These storm-petrels allowed the boat to approach them very, very closely in the sunshine! Amazing! Maybe, the sun was in their eyes, but it allowed for some fantastic photographic opportunities. Finally, on the way home, Peter Pyle spotted a HY TUFTED PUFFIN.
    
    Marine mammals were another story altogether — 52 HUMPBACK WHALES, gorging on schools of fish being herded by hundreds of CALIFORNIA SEA LIONS (420). Many humpbacks flipper-slapping and launching themselves out of the sea! Other pinnipeds included: STELLER'S SEA LION (1), NORTHERN FUR SEAL (12!), NORTHERN ELEPHANT SEAL (4), HARBOR SESAL (4). Other cetaceans included: SHORT-BEAKED COMMON DOLPHINS (350), PACIFIC WHITE-SIDED DOLPHIN (30), HARBOR PORPOISE (18), DALL'S PORPOISE (15). OCEAN SUNFISH (13) and BLUE SHARK (2) were the fish highlights.
    
    This was a very busy day with non-stop action, either seabirds or mammals, or both, without a minute's rest! We returned to the dock in T-shirts and sunshine! The only 'problem' was that it was so calm that all of the tubenoses were sitting on the water. Few shearwaters, and practically no albatrosses were flying. (So, if there was a Hawaiian Petrel out there, it would have been sitting on the water). Sea surface temperatures remained mostly steady, from 60-62F with no breaks.
    
    All together, two really wonderful days at sea.
    
    Spaces are available on these upcoming trips:
    
    HALF MOON BAY: We will be looking for the storm-petrels on every trip.
    AUG 8, 16; SEP 6, 15; OCT 4, 11.
    
    MONTEREY:
    AUG 7, 21; SEP 5, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13, 16, 25, 26, 27; OCT 3, 10.
    
    FARALLON ISLANDS:
    OCT 18: GREAT WHITE SHARK SEARCH
    
    BODEGA BAY:
    SEP 18 (very limited spaces available)
    
    ALBACORE MONTEREY:
    SEP 12 (very limited spaces available)
    
    RESERVATIONS: Email me: debi@... for information.
    Beat the heat and jump on a boat!
    Living the Salt Life,
    Debi Shearwater
    
    DEBRA SHEARWATER
    Shearwater Journeys, Inc.
    PO Box 190
    Hollister, CA 95024
    831.637.8527
    debi@...
    www.shearwaterjourneys.com
    www.shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com
    
    
  24. -back to top-
  25. cruise-ship pelagic: Laysan, Hawaiians, Cook's, Scripps's LINK
    DATE: Aug 2, 2015 @ 5:02am, 3 year(s) ago
    Our cruise-ship pelagic on Princess from San Francisco to se. Alaska and
    back departed late afternoon on 31 July, giving us just a few hours in
    the waters off Pt Reyes and the Cordell Bank area before dark, where we
    had a LAYSAN ALBATROSS west of Bodega Head, a SCRIPPS'S MURRELET off Pt.
    Reyes, a dozen fulmars, and although just a small number of Sabine's
    Gulls at least one was a juvenile--seemingly very early for that age but
    several others already reported the past several days by others. At dawn
    on 1 August we were well west of Trinidad, Humboldt County, where it
    continued very calm and flat. The only minor highlights in CA waters
    were SOUTH POLAR SKUA and several Arctic Terns off Del Norte. Once in OR
    waters, the wind really picked up (to gale force), and off central OR we
    had 2 HAWAIIAN PETRELS and 1 COOK'S PETREL (ca. 190-200 km off
    Winchester Bay to Dunes City), though by far the rarest bird of the day
    was the BLACK STORM-PETREL (as long as it wasn't a Tristram's...) ca.
    125 km W of s. Curry County, with Leach's. Alas, no photos. Also in OR
    we had a single BULLER'S SHEARWATER, SOUTH POLAR SKUA, a dozen Arctic
    Terns, and a couple Long-tailed Jaegers. But overall, there were a
    number of long stretches with very few birds. The day ended some 250 km
    W of Tillamook Head. Tomorrow we'll be off BC. --Paul Lehman
    
    Sea surface temps were quite unusual: 64.4F well off cen. Humboldt
    County, and a balmy 68F when 150 miles off n. Oregon...
    
    --Paul Lehman, San Diego
    
    
  26. -back to top-
  27. n. CA cruise-ship pelagic highlights, Jul 12 & 20 LINK
    DATE: Jul 22, 2015 @ 6:56am, 3 year(s) ago
    Oregon birders J. Gilligan and O. Schmidt took the July 11th sailing of
    the 10-day round-trip San Francisco to se. Alaska Princess cruise that
    is run all summer long and which is excellent for a variety of pelagic
    species. Their strong emphasis is always Oregon waters, so their
    birding in n. CA waters was somewhat low-key and incomplete. But despite
    that, they still saw a single HAWAIIAN PETREL off Humboldt Co. on July
    12th and a single COOK'S PETREL there on July 20th. Also numbers of Ashy
    Storm-Petrels off Humboldt and Del Norte. They also had excellent
    totals of both HAWAIIAN (6) and COOK'S (5) Petrels off s. Oregon on the
    12th. Good to excellent numbers of pelagics off both OR and WA,
    including a few Flesh-footed Shearwaters, a good count of South
    Polar Skuas, and a single Ashy Storm-Petrel in OR waters, where casual.
    
    B. Rideout and I will be taking this same cruise soon as well, departing
    July 31st--my personal 8th time taking this trip in the past three years.
    
    --Paul Lehman, San Diego
    
    
  28. -back to top-
  29. Forty Years of California Seabirding LINK
    DATE: Jun 20, 2015 @ 6:10pm, 3 year(s) ago
    Howdy, CalBirders,
    Shearwater Journeys will celebrate its 40th year of seabirding this fall! And, we'd love to invite you to celebrate with us.
    
    Some 60,000+ birders and marine life enthusiasts have participated in thousands of Shearwater Journeys' pelagic trips over these past four decades. Participants, along with more than a hundred leaders over the years, have contributed an immense amount of data, advanced the progression of seabird field guides, fought for National Marine Sanctuaries collecting thousands of signatures, advocated for conservation laws, witnessed the return of the great whales from near decimation, seen the "return" of some seabirds such as Short-tailed Albatross and the decline of others, such as Sooty Shearwater and Ashy Storm-Petrel.
    
    We've discovered a long, long list "first" North American seabird records and found many rare-for-California seabirds. We've battled gill netting which killed thousands of Sooty Shearwaters and Common Murres, and won. We remember when Laysan Albatrosses did not nest on islands off Mexico! Marine mammals have not been neglected on our trips. We set the wheels in motion to rescue an entangled humpback whale only for the rescuers to be thwarted by the appearance of killer whales! We launched the first-ever in the world, blue whale tagging program with EarthWatch in mid-1980's. Beginning in the late 1970's, we collected the first of hundreds of killer whale images that would be used in ID catalogues. And, we're still at it today.
    
    And, we've been out there in the blue, at sea, during the biggest El Nino events of our lifetime, 1982-83 and 1998, during La Nina events and everything in between. The 1982-83 El Nino impacted every continent on Earth, and we saw events transpire in Monterey Bay that have never repeated. OH, wait a minute. I hear the red crabs are back, at least in SoCal:
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/capital-weather-gang/wp/2015/06/17/red-crabs-swarm-southern-california-linked-to-warm-blob-in-pacific/
    
    There's so much more. Indeed, I could write a book about the changes I've seen. Our roots are deep and vast much like a giant kelp forest moving with the currents. It has been a long and winding journey — and, we could not have done it without you! I am, personally, grateful and thankful for every one of you, many of whom continue to ride the seas with us, four decades later! THANK YOU!
    
    Shearwater Journeys' 2015 schedule of trips can be found on our web site:
    http://www.shearwaterjourneys.com/schedule.shtml
    
    Photographs and brief biographies of our outstanding leaders can be found at:
    http://shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com/2014/07/our-leaders.html
    
    DISCOUNTS: To celebrate our 40th year, we are offering a $40 discount on all Monterey Bay trips, except the Albacore trip, September 12th. We offer a $20 discount on our Half Moon Bay, Bodega Bay and Farallon Islands trips. All discounted trips are non-refundable, unless weathered out (unlikely) and must be postmarked by July 1. Act now!
    
    MONTEREY BAY TRIPS: All trips depart from Fishermans' Wharf at 7 am and return at 3 pm.
    JULY 31; AUGUST 7, 21; SEPTEMBER 5, 8, 0, 1O, 11, 13, 16, 25, 26, 27; OCTOBER 3, 10.
    ALBACORE: OFFSHORE MONTEREY: SEPTEMBER 12 departs at 5:30 am and returns 5:30 pm.
    Parking vouchers available for all trips, saving you at least $10.
    
    HALF MOON BAY TRIPS:
    All trips depart from Johnson's Pier, H dock, Pillar Point, Half Moon Bay at 7 am and return about 4 pm. Parking is free.
    AUGUST 2, 8, 16; SEPTEMBER 6, 15; OCTOBER 4, 11.
    
    FARALLON ISLANDS: Both trips depart from Clipper Yacht Harbor at 7:15 am, and return about 4 pm. Parking is $2/person.
    AUGUST 9: TUFTED PUFFINS & BREEDING SEABIRDS - limited spaces available
    OCTOBER 18: GREAT WHITE SHARKS & SEABIRDS
    
    BODEGA BAY:
    Departs from Port O'Bodega at 7 am and returns about 4:30 pm. Parking is free.
    SEPTEMBER 18: CORDELL BANK & BODEGA CANYON
    
    We track county lines and write eBird checklists for all of our trips. Most of our trips cover more than one county. For past trip reports including images and complete checklists, please see:
    http://www.shearwaterjourneys.com/tripsumm.shtml
    
    August 2nd has proved to be an auspicious date for HAWAIIAN PETREL: August 2, 2014 at Half Moon Bay, this petrel flew right up our wake only a few miles out of the harbor. August 2, 2013 at Monterey Bay, I spotted this petrel without bins, flying alongside our vessel with a load of Sooty Shearwaters only 8 miles off Point Pinos! Most of the Hawaiian Petrels that I've seen in central California have been less than 10 miles offshore, including three in one day out of Fort Bragg. Where will you be on August 2, 2015
    
    Todd McGrath's post on CalBirds about predicting seabirds in this uncanny season are on the mark. Recalling the BULWER'S PETREL, July 26, 1998, Monterey Bay was an amazing find, especially for a boat load of non-birders who wanted to know why I kept stopping to look at the "little black and white birds" (54 Scripps's Murrelets that day), instead of the 50+ Fin and Blue Whales! The Bulwer's Petrel was photographed sitting on the water with a BULLER'S SHEARWATER! So, yep, Buller's arrived early that year. Who would have ever dreamed of finding Black Storm-Petrels in Monterey in December We did, in 1982. El Nino at work! There's no telling what we might find this season. Terrafin charts are showing plenty of cold water in many places. This is good. So, don't miss out this season! Celebrate!
    
    For me, there has never, ever been a dull moment. Never. If you sense a deep and abiding love of seabirds and marine mammals —
    Shearwaters Forever,
    Debi Shearwater
    DEBRA SHEARWATER
    Shearwater Journeys, Inc.
    PO Box 190
    Hollister, CA 95024
    831.637.8527
    debi@...
    www.shearwaterjourneys.com
    www.shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com
    
    Celebrating 40 Years of Seabirding with Shearwater Journeys
    
    
  30. -back to top-


-revision history-
v1.30 - 01/05/16 - Revamped cloud logic, optimized database queries, linked to eBird rarities.
v1.23 - 12/08/11 - Added direct link to CBRC records.
v1.22 - 12/03/11 - Corrected GMT offsets on dates. Added last 5 posts at top.
v1.21 - 11/24/11 - Added direct link to range map for NA birds.
v1.2  - 11/23/11 - Greatly improved graphing technology - separates month vs. year by posts. Added species auto-complete functionality.
v1.14 - 11/22/11 - Added cloud bubble for common thread topics.
v1.13 - 11/22/11 - Added integrated photos where available.
v1.12 - 11/22/11 - Added multiple input boxes for additional refinement, negative search criteria (eg. -keyword).
v1.11 - 11/22/11 - Added banding code, species look-up. Also direct link to recent eBird observations.
 v1.1 - 11/22/11 - Added 'date' functionality. Shows top 'month/year' combinations for a query. Restrict results to that 'month/year'.
 v1.0 - 11/21/11 - Initial version coded. Currently archiving 'lacobirds' and 'calbirds'.