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   Greater Roadrunner
Greater Roadrunner
Geococcyx californianus


   Greater Roadrunner (Geococcyx californianus) - GRRO (recent eBird sightings, view CBRC records, range map
)

  1. Western Field Ornithologist in Pueblo, CO August 16-20, 2017 LINK
    DATE: May 15, 2017 @ 12:41pm, 6 month(s) ago
    From Broad-tailed and Black-chinned Hummingbirds to Mississippi Kites, that’s what we will be finding at WFO’s Annual Conference in Pueblo, Colorado. Do you like Pinyon-Juniper habitat That’s where we find, of course, Pinyon Jays. But even better, last year’s Western Scrub-jay was split, and Colorado’s species is the Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay. And in prairie habitat—look for Curve-billed Thrasher, Greater Roadrunner, Scaled Quail, and maybe Ladder-backed Woodpecker. If you fancy sparrows, listen and look for Cassin’s and Brewer’s Sparrows, along with Green-tailed Towhee. Other woodpeckers can be found in the mountains—Lewis’s, along with Red-naped and Williamson’s Sapsuckers. Other mountain birds are Plumbeous Vireo and Pygmy Nuthatch. Flycatchers include Olive-sided, Dusky, and Cordilleran—(Can you tell a Cordilleran from a Pacific-slope Does it make a difference). You can find Black and Eastern Phoebes, Juniper Titmouse, Cassin’s Kingbird, and Canyon Towhee just west of Pueblo. If all that sounds like exciting birdlife, it is. Don’t miss it! The annual WFO conference is a four day event that includes scientific presentations, workshops, field trips and other workshops. Dr. Lauryn Benedict, an expert on animal communication and social behavior, will be our keynote speaker, speaking on “He Sings, She Sings: Female Songbirds in Your Backyard.” Her main research is of bird song for understanding how signals evolve in nature. To understand song function, she examines how individuals use vocal signals within environmental and social contexts. She also studies larger patterns of song evolution by measuring how songs vary through time and space, both within and between species. Some of her current projects examine the function and evolution of song and duets among Colorado wren species, New World sparrows, and Old World warblers. Lauryn is Associate Professor of Biological Sciences at the University of Northern Colorado. Lauryn also will be giving a workshop, “Birds from the Inside Out,” which will focus on how avian anatomy produces identifying characteristics. Furthering our understanding of birdsong, Nathan Pieplow’s workshop is “Identifying Birds by Their Sounds.” Nathan is the author of the recently released Peterson Field Guide to Bird Sounds of Eastern North America. He also will be presenting his annual “Bird Sound Identification: Team Challenge.” Of course, to learn identification visually, Ed Harper will be presenting his Bird Photo ID Panel.” Other workshops will focus on how to find birds by learning “What do Birds Eat” by entomologist Dave Leatherman, “How to Make, Edit, Share, and Publish Bird Vocalizations” by Ted Floyd, “The Ins and Outs of eBird: from the Basics to Advanced Use and Application,” by Scott Somershoe, and “Identification of Shorebirds,” by Jon Dunn. WFO returns to Colorado for the first time in many years, where there are many species that don’t occur in the Far West, including many species of workshop and field trip leaders! Within Colorado, a wide variety of habitats and species near Pueblo is one of the main reasons this venue was selected for WFO’s annual conference. Another reason is accommodations at the Marriott Hotel. It is located by a walkway to the Pueblo Convention Center, where all activities will be held--workshops, banquet, reception, and exhibitors. Registration link: http://www.westernfieldornithologists.org/conference.php
    
    Frances Oliver WFO Outreach Coordinator & Board Member
  2. -back to top-
  3. Re: [CALBIRDS] A MTY Co. Big Day 4/28: LITTLE STINT, LITTLE GULL, LBBG LINK
    DATE: Apr 29, 2017, 7 month(s) ago
    Hi Calbirders
    
    Here are two eBird checklists with Little Stint and Little Gull photos. Sorry for the quality!
    
    https://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S36387955
    
    and
    
    https://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S36387535
    
    Thanks
    
    Brian
    
    On Sat, Apr 29, 2017 at 8:30 PM, B Matheson gypaetusbarbatus@... [CALBIRDS] < CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com > wrote:
    
      Greetings Birders
    
    Yesterday Brian Sullivan, Paul Fenwick, Cooper Scollan and I, attempted a Monterey County Big Day. We hoped to surpass the impressive county Big Day record set by Scott Terrill, Steve Rovell and John Sterling in 1999, of 208 species. We succeeded in this, tallying 217 species. All ABA count protocols were followed. Outside help the day of was neither offered nor accepted. No playback was used. 
    
    Unexpected rarities included: an alternate plumaged LITTLE STINT at Jetty Road, Moss Landing; a 1cy LITTLE GULL at the mouth of the Pajaro River; a 1cy LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL at the Pajaro River Mouth and a nice alternate adult FRANKLIN'S GULL, also at Jetty Road, Moss Landing. 
    
    Besides these rarities, we had good luck with lots of rare migrants and breeders. Beginning at 1200AM, nocturnal highlights were duetting LONG-EARED OWLS, BURROWING OWL and territorial LESSER NIGHTHAWK. We even managed some night glimpses of stakeout geese: ROSS'S, GREATER WHITE-FRONTED and ALEUTIAN. After sunrise/daylight, we did well with scarcities in the upper Salinas Valley like BLUE GROSBEAK, NASHVILLE WARBLER, BELL'S SPARROW and GREATER ROADRUNNER. Arroyo Seco and the Carmel Valley had a nice male COSTA'S HUMMINGBIRD and a couple of BLACK-CHINNED HUMMINGBIRDS, along with multiple territorial MACGILLIVRAY'S WARBLERS. The outer Monterey Peninsula produced our only really surprising miss: Black Turnstone.  At the Point Pinos Seawatch, good northwest winds yielded lots of BLACK-FOOTED ALBATROSSES from shore, but less diversity than we hoped for. Late, lingering, grebe and gull species were all still present in single digits from Monterey to Marina. Up in the Elkhorn Slough area, in addition to the above "red letter" rarities, we did well with YELLOW-HEADED BLACKBIRD, RED KNOT, late ducks (including at least seven REDHEAD), and a lone WHITE-FACED IBIS. 
    
    It was all great fun. 
    
    Good birding, 
    
    Blake Matheson
    Monterey Peninsula
    
    --
    ===========
    Brian L. Sullivan
    
    eBird Project Leader
    www.ebird.org
    
    Photo Editor
    Birds of North America Online
    http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/BNA
    -------------------------------
  4. -back to top-
  5. A MTY Co. Big Day 4/28: LITTLE STINT, LITTLE GULL, LBBG LINK
    DATE: Apr 29, 2017, 7 month(s) ago
    Greetings Birders
    
    Yesterday Brian Sullivan, Paul Fenwick, Cooper Scollan and I, attempted a Monterey County Big Day. We hoped to surpass the impressive county Big Day record set by Scott Terrill, Steve Rovell and John Sterling in 1999, of 208 species. We succeeded in this, tallying 217 species. All ABA count protocols were followed. Outside help the day of was neither offered nor accepted. No playback was used.
    
    Unexpected rarities included: an alternate plumaged LITTLE STINT at Jetty Road, Moss Landing; a 1cy LITTLE GULL at the mouth of the Pajaro River; a 1cy LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL at the Pajaro River Mouth and a nice alternate adult FRANKLIN'S GULL, also at Jetty Road, Moss Landing.
    
    Besides these rarities, we had good luck with lots of rare migrants and breeders. Beginning at 1200AM, nocturnal highlights were duetting LONG-EARED OWLS,BURROWING OWL and territorial LESSER NIGHTHAWK. We even managed some night glimpses of stakeout geese: ROSS'S, GREATER WHITE-FRONTED and ALEUTIAN. After sunrise/daylight, we did well with scarcities in the upper Salinas Valley like BLUE GROSBEAK, NASHVILLE WARBLER, BELL'S SPARROW and GREATER ROADRUNNER. Arroyo Seco and the Carmel Valley had a nice male COSTA'SHUMMINGBIRD and a couple of BLACK-CHINNED HUMMINGBIRDS, along with multiple territorial MACGILLIVRAY'S WARBLERS. The outer Monterey Peninsula produced our only really surprising miss: Black Turnstone. At the PointPinos Seawatch,good northwest winds yielded lots of BLACK-FOOTED ALBATROSSES from shore, but less diversity than we hoped for. Late, lingering, grebe and gull species were all still present in single digits from Monterey to Marina. Up in the Elkhorn Slough area, in addition to the above "red letter" rarities, we did well with YELLOW-HEADED BLACKBIRD, RED KNOT, late ducks (including at least seven REDHEAD), and a lone WHITE-FACED IBIS.
    
    It was all great fun.
    
    Good birding,
    
    Blake Matheson
    Monterey Peninsula
  6. -back to top-
  7. MERCEY HOT SPRINGS: NOTICE OF ROAD CLOSURE LINK
    DATE: Nov 18, 2016, 1 year(s) ago
    Hello, Birders,
    
    I’ve just arrived home from a four day road trip, birding San Benito Mountain and various places in south San Benito County. I noticed a post regarding Mercey Hot Springs and the Long-eared Owls.
    
    I received a notice from Mercey Hot Springs this evening, stating that they have been informed by Panoche Valley Solar LLC, that LITTLE PANOCHE ROAD WILL BE CLOSED from I-5 to Mercey Hot Springs due to road/bridge construction from approximately November 28 through December 4 (although this could change). Please continue to read this post for more information that may be important if you plan to visit Panoche Valley.
    
    I was last out in Panoche Valley on October 24 & 25. I was told that the County of Fresno had effectively halted the trail of large trucks traveling Little Panoche Road due to the wear and tear on the roads. It appears that Fresno County officials have effectively negotiated some sort of plan to repair the road. (I doubt that San Benito County has done anything about the wear and tear on their roads.)
    
    Panoche Valley Solar LLC has placed orange speed limit signs along Little Panoche Road that state the speed is 25 mph. At least one sign is located only 10-15 feet from a 55 mph sign. This is confusing.
    
    I spoke with the roads person in SBT County. The real speed limit in the construction area is supposed to be 35 mph . The only reason I bring this up is because the road is being heavily patrolled by the California Highway Patrol and the San Benito Sherif— pretty much, day and night.
    
    I was stopped by the CHP for doing 35 mph on Little Panoche Road. I was not ticketed or anything like that. However, the CHP officer took my name and address. I drove off, thought about it— thought he was probably giving my name and address to the solar people. Turned around, drove back to Little Panoche Road— and, sure enough, there was the CHP stopped right in the middle of the road next to the solar company’s pickup truck— and, well, I have to think that was precisely what he did— gave them my name and address.
    
    Bottom line: DO NOT SPEED. Do not give anyone an excuse to collect your name and address.
    
    The situation along Little Panoche Road has been and continues to be extremely hostile. I stated this to the road’s person for SBT County, and he said that he has heard this from a lot of people! Be careful, especially when pointing cameras and binoculars (The CHP made special note that I had binoculars! Why) It was all I could do not to mouth off to the CHP when he stopped me. I didn’t, though. However, when I returned and saw him talking to the solar truck, I did get his name and badge number, “just in case” —
    
    Elsewhere in PV, there is a lot of activity in many places, including helicopter activity that is flushing many birds. IF Mountain Plovers show up anywhere in the valley (very unlikely along Little Panoche Road) — anywhere, they are bound to be flushed by the helicopter activities— especially out near Silver Creek Ranch area. But, there are “operations” as part of the solar installation going on almost everywhere in the valley, not just along Little Panoche Road. BTW, the solar workers tend to take lunch at the Panoche Inn. I’ve steered clear of that.
    
    If you are driving Panoche Road from Hollister, be aware that I have encountered “convoys” of large pickup trucks — 13 of them in one convoy on 24 October. So, take care when stopping to bird along this road as so many birders do. Be sure you are well off the road when stopping.
    
    Paicines Reservoir along Highway 25 has been a traditional stop for many field trips heading to Panoche Valley. This reservoir has been bone dry sine May 2014. The “water level” is completely controlled by the county at this reservoir. I’ve just retuned from the far southern parts of SBT County. And, what I could see of Hernandez Reservoir is bone dry as well. Hernandez is at least twice as large as Paicines— when either has any water.
    
    There is a good pullout next to Paicines Reservoir, although it can be muddy if it rains. I would welcome eBird checklists as the reservoir is a hot spot. It would be good to have “negative” data from this hot spot. Raptors have been hanging around. On 15 November, I recorded 2 FERRUGINOUS HAWKS , a male MERLIN , and a GREATER ROADRUNNER was walking on the dry floor of the reservoir. So, still worth a stop these days.
    
    There are many eBird hot spots along Panoche Road and in Panoche Valley itself. Please, please use these hot spots and limit traveling counts to 5 miles or less.
    
    Some other highlights from PV on October 24: MERLIN at McCullough Ranch; 410 HORNED LARKS and GOLDEN EAGLE soaring over Little Panoche Rd; 2 BELL’S SPARROWS and 1 MOUNTAIN BLUEBIRD at the entrance to Panoche Hills BLM area and more of both species up in the hills along with 2 CHUKARS; FERRUGINOUS HAWK at Norton Rd; 2 CASSIN’S KINGBIRDS (they continue to be reported) and 1 CLAY-COLORED SPARROW (first for PV area) near Douglas Ranch. October 25: 1 NORTHERN HARRIER, 1 male LAWRENCE’S GOLDFINCH at Panoche Creek; 3 VESPER SPARROWS, 1 FERRUGINOUS HAWK at Silver Creek Ranch area; TRICOLORED BLACKBIRDS near Douglas Ranch; PRAIRIE FALCON along New Idria Rd; 1 RED-BREASTED SAPSUCKER near McCullough Ranch.
    
    BEAWARE if it rains, any dirt roads including road shoulders can easily cause your vehicle to get stuck! Panoche Hills BLM area has a lot of dirt roads. Panoche Road beyond Silver Creek corrals is dirt. It only takes a tiny bit of rain!
    
    Steel Your Heart if you are heading to Panoche Valley,
    Debi
    
    DEBRA SHEARWATER
    Shearwater Journeys, Inc.
    PO Box 190
    Hollister, CA 95024
    831.637.8527
    debi@...
    www.shearwaterjourneys.com
    www.shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com
    
    Celebrating 41 Years of Seabirding with Shearwater Journeys
    Siberia ’s Forgotten Coast Voyage: 27 June -10 July with Debi & nesting Spoon-billed Sandpipers
  8. -back to top-
  9. Panoche Valley: End of an Era LINK
    DATE: Oct 21, 2015 @ 1:32pm, 2 year(s) ago
    Howdy, Birders,
    
    Below is a post that I wrote for the local Monterey list serve. However, as so many birders in the Bay Area and surrounding counties have birded Panoche Valley for decades, I thought this would be of interest to others. The stakes are in the ground and construction is slated to begin on November 1. If you desire an unobstructed view or photographs of Panoche Valley, best to get out there, ASAP.
    
    Here's the post:
    
    With the development of a solar industry on the floor of PANOCHE VALLEY, I have been devoting more and more time to this incredible natural area. Much activity in preparation for the solar installation has been happening already — the stakes are in the ground. If you have loved birding Panoche Valley in the past, I urge you to get out there before November 1 when real activity is slated to begin. You may never again be able to get an unobstructed view or photograph of the valley floor from Shotgun Pass along Little Panoche Road — at least not in our lifetime. This is the demise of a GLOBALLY IMPORTANT BIRD AREA (IBA): http://netapp.audubon.org/IBA/Site/227
    
    Panoche Valley is home to three Federally Endangered Species: San Joaquin Kit Fox, Giant Kangaroo Rat, and Blunt-nosed Leopard Lizard. It is also a major wintering area for Mountain Plovers which should be listed as endangered. Many other important and declining species of birds call this valley home.
    
    Beware: The valley is seriously suffering from the drought of the past four years. Many areas are grazed to zero vegetation, meaning only bare dirt exists. Consequently, birding can be very slow. Even in this starkest of times, the valley retains its beauty. Stay for the sunsets!
    
    Recently, I spent October 14 and 15, birding mostly on the valley floor. I did not bird along Panoche Road in the oak woodlands, but headed straight for the valley.
    
    Some "goodies" on October 15, PANOCHE ROAD on the valley floor included: continuing for the past month, 2 CASSIN'S KINGBIRDS and 600 TRICOLORED BLACKBIRDS near the Douglas Ranch; a SAGE THRASHER ran right across the road near the Claravale Dairy; one GREATER ROADRUNNER near Silver Creek Ranch; and a BROAD-WINGED HAWK.
    
    The Broad-winged Hawk represents San Benito County's third record that I know of. The first record of a Broad-winged Hawk was radio tagged by GGRO, and flew through Panoche Valley. The second record was of a soaring bird seen at Pinnacles.
    
    Some of the species that typically flock up have started to form such flocks on the valley floor. These include: Lark Sparrow, Mourning Dove, and House Finch. Recent migrants have included: Hermit Thrush, Red-breasted Nuthatch, Common Yellowthroat, Wilson's Warbler, and Orange-crowned Warbler. August 28 there was a very early Lincoln's Sparrow which was followed by a major influx of some 52 Lincoln's Sparrows on September 24.
    
    Resident species are around in decent numbers: Loggerhead Shrike, American Kestrel, Rock Wren, Ravens, etc. However, other raptors have been very thin. I have rarely seen Prairie Falcon and Golden Eagle. I photographed an immature Golden Eagle perched on a pole out in a distant field, along Little Panoche Road, thinking it might be the last time such a photograph could be made — not sure how they are going to deal with the solar panels. Will they perch on them I have not seen any Ferruginous Hawks, Burrowing Owls or Merlins in the valley, although I recently have seen both near my home.
    
    Mountain Plovers, Mountain Bluebirds, and Vesper Sparrows have not arrived. There are a few Western Bluebirds on the valley floor, though. Apparently, they nested in the valley (Normally, they nest in the oak forests). Also a family of California Quail nested on the valley floor as well. This was a big surprise to me!
    
    In one of the greatest successes of this severe drought, I was able to document a pair of NORTHERN HARRIERS that nested successfully in the valley! This was one of only two nests this spring in San Benito County that I found. The other nest was destroyed when the hay field was plowed, unfortunately.
    
    Panoche Valley was "discovered" in the late 1970's by two local birders the late Carolyn Frederiksen and the late, Steve Allison, both dearly beloved members of the Santa Cruz Bird Club. Steve went on to found the Panoche Valley Christmas Bird Count. To this day they are still missed.
    
    My personal opinion is that this solar industry development in PanocheValley signals the demise of a habitat type that is becoming more and more impacted throughout California and rapidly shrinking. Sad to see. We can only document the changing rhythm of this lovely place.
    
    I hope you make it out there and get some photographs as soon as possible.
    
    Birding on the Faultlines,
    Debi Shearwater
    San Benito County
    
    DEBRA SHEARWATER
    Shearwater Journeys, Inc.
    PO Box 190
    Hollister, CA 95024
    831.637.8527
    debi@...
    www.shearwaterjourneys.com
    www.shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com
    
    Celebrating 40 Years of Seabirding with Shearwater Journeys
    
    
  10. -back to top-
  11. Kern County Birdiest Count Final Report Including Locations LINK
    DATE: May 8, 2015 @ 10:46am, 3 year(s) ago
    Hi,
    
    "Missed"or just not present (too early, too late, no coverage where
    occurs, and/or rare to very rare and not annual; several known
    usual nesting species missed) - Lesser Scaup, Common
    Goldeneye, Common Merganser,
    Red-breasted Merganser, Ring-necked Pheasant, Pacific Loon,
    Common
    Loon, Horned Grebe,
    American Bittern (Kern NWR), Least Bittern (Kern
    NWR), Northern Goshawk, Bald Eagle, Lesser Yellowlegs, Ruddy
    Turnstone,
    Short-billed Dowitcher, Herring Gull, Common Ground-Dove,
    Vaux's Swift,
    Williamson's Sapsucker, Pileated Woodpecker, Merlin, Peregrine
    Falcon, Brown-crested Flycatcher, Yellow-billed Magpie, Clark's
    Nutcracker,
    Pacific
    Wren,
    Varied Thrush,
    Sage Thrasher, American Pipit, Vesper
    Sparrow, Grasshopper
    Sparrow, Swamp Sparrow, Harris's Sparrow, Indigo Bunting, Red
    Crossbill, plus even rarer species,...
    
    CONTENTS:
    ***Count Period
    ***Reported in 2014, not in 2015
    ***Reported in 2015, not in 2014
    ***2015 Kern Birdiest Count Period List of 227 species
    ***Total Species Numbers from all prior 72 hour Kern Birdiest Counts
    ***79 Known Participants
    
    ***72 Hour Kern County Birdiest Count, 3:30pm, Thursday, April 1, 2015
    through
    to 3:30pm, Sunday, May 3, 2015.
    
    ***REPORTED IN 2014, NOT IN 2015: Lesser Scaup,
    Common Goldeneye, Common Merganser, Red-breasted Merganser, Common
    Loon, Horned Grebe, Northern Goshawk, Lesser Yellowlegs, Ruddy
    Turnstone, Short-billed Dowitcher, Common Ground-Dove, Vaux's Swift,
    Pileated Woodpecker, Peregrine Falcon, Plumbeous Vireo, Clark's
    Nutcracker, Pacific Wren, American Pipit, Grasshopper Sparrow, Red
    Crossbill,...
    
    ***REPORTED IN 2015, NOT IN 2014: Canvasback,
    Red
    Knot,
    Sanderling,
    Baird's
    Sandpiper,
    Semipalmated
    Sandpiper,
    Vermilion
    Flycatcher,
    Evening
    Grosbeak
    
    NOTE: Species reported in UPPER CASE
    LETTERS; species missed during count listed in lower case letters. Remember,
    UPPER
    CASE
    LETTERING
    shows
    2015 species reported.
    
    ***2015 KERN BIRDIEST COUNT PERIOD LIST (XXX SPECIES):
    
    ***NOT expected - convincing details and/or pictures required
    
    GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE - Frazier ParkSnow GooseROSS'S GOOSE - California CityBrant***Cackling Goose***CANADA GOOSE - Bakersfield's Truxton Lakes, Kern River County
    Park, Lake Woollomes east of
    Delano, WOOD DUCK- Kern River County Park, Kern River PreserveGADWALL- reports for numerous locationsAMERICAN WIGEON - Bear Valley Springs/Tehahchapi, China Lake
    NAWS,
    Kern NWREurasian Wigeon***MALLARD- reports for numerous locationsBLUE-WINGED TEAL - China Lake NAWSCINNAMON TEAL- China Lake NAWS, Kern NWRNORTHERN SHOVELER- China Lake NAWS, Kern NWRNORTHERN PINTAIL - Kern NWRGREEN-WINGED TEAL- China Lake NAWSCANVASBACK - Kern NWRREDHEAD- California City, China Lake NAWS, Kern NWRRING-NECKED DUCK- Lake Jean,, Tehachapi WTP (sewage ponds)Greater Scaup***Lesser ScaupBUFFLEHEAD - China Lake NAWS, Lake Woollomes east of DelanoCommon GoldeneyeCommon MerganserRed-breasted Merganser***RUDDY DUCK- reports for numerous
    locationsMOUNTAIN QUAIL- reports for numerous locationsCALIFORNIA QUAIL - reports for
    numerous locationsCHUKAR - Butterbredt Spring, Wind Wolves PreserveRing-necked PheasantSOOTY GROUSE***- Sunday Peak in the Greenhorn MountainsWILD TURKEY- Kern River PreservePacific Loon***Common Loon***PIED-BILLED GREBE- reports for numerous locationsHorned Grebe***EARED GREBE- China Lake NAWS, Kern NWRWESTERN GREBE- Isabella Reservoir, Kern NWR, Kern River County
    Park, Lake
    Woollomes east of DelanoCLARK'S GREBE - Isabella Reservoir, Kern River County Park, Lake
    Woollomes east of DelanoDOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT- China Lake NAWS, Kern NWR, Kern River
    County
    Park, Lake Woollomes east of
    DelanoAMERICAN WHITE PELICAN - Isabella ReservoirAmerican BitternLeast Bittern***GREAT BLUE HERON- reports for numerous locationsGREAT EGRET- reports for numerous
    locationsSNOWY EGRET- Kern NWR, Kernville, Lake Woollomes east of DelanoCATTLE EGRET- From along CA Hwy 99 south of Bakersfield,
    Tehachapi's Tom Sawyer LakeGREEN HERON - Edwards AFB, GalileoBLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON - California City, Edwards AFB, Kern
    NWR, Lake
    Woollomes east of Delano, Tehachapi WTP (sewage ponds)WHITE-FACED IBIS- reports for numerous locationsTURKEY VULTURE- reports for
    numerous locationsCALIFORNIA CONDOR (now countable) - Bear Valley Springs, Tejon
    RanchOSPREY - Edwards AFB, Isabella Reservor--Nuui CunniWHITE-TAILED KITE - Edwards AFBGOLDEN EAGLE - Breckenridge Mountain, west of Rosamond, Wind
    Wolves PreserveNORTHERN HARRIER - Edwards AFB, Garces Hwy west of Delano, Kern
    NWR, Wind Wolves PreserveSHARP-SHINNED HAWK - GalileoCOOPER'S HAWK- Ridgecrest,
    Kernville, Lake Woollomes east of Delano, TehachapiNorthern Goshawk***Bald EagleCommon Black Hawk***RED-SHOULDERED HAWK - Kern River Parkway corridor through
    Bakersfield, Kern River PreserveSWAINSON'S HAWK - Garces Hwy west of Delano, Kern NWR, Sand
    Canyon above Iindian Wells Valley, Tehachapi, Tule Elk State Reserve
    (two nesting
    pairs)Zone-tailed Hawk***RED-TAILED HAWK- reports for
    numerous locationsVIRGINIA RAIL- China Lake NAWS, Kern NWRSORA- California City, China Lake NAWS, Kern NWRCOMMON GALLINULE - China Lake NAWS, Kern NWRAMERICAN COOT- reports for
    numerous locations
    BLACK-NECKED STILT - China Lake NAWS, Kern NWR, Lake Woollomes
    east of
    DelanoAMERICAN AVOCET - China Lake NAWS, Isabella Reservoir, Kern NWR,
    Lake
    Woollomes east of DelanoBLACK-BELLIED PLOVER - Lake Woollomes east of DelanoAmerican Golden-Plover***Pacific Golden-Plover***
    SNOWY PLOVER - Lake Woollomes east of Delano, San Joaquin Valley private propertySEMIPALMATED PLOVER- China Lake NAWS, Isabella Reservoir, San Joaquin Valley private
    propertyKILLDEER- reports for numerous locationsSPOTTED SANDPIPER - reports for
    numerous locationsSOLITARY SANDPIPER - "Old Sewage Ponds" at Ridgecrest Watchable
    Wildlife ParkWandering Tattler***GREATER YELLOWLEGS- Kern NWRWILLET - San Joaquin Valley
    private propertyLesser YellowlegsWHIMBREL- China Lake NAWS, Kern NWR, San Joaquin Valley private propertyLONG-BILLED CURLEW- China Lake NAWS, Lake Woollomes east of DelanoMARBLED GODWIT - China Lake NAWSRuddy Turnstone***RED KNOT*** - San Joaquin Valley
    private propertyRuff***Stilt Sandpiper***SANDERLING*** - San Joaquin Valley
    private propertyDUNLIN - China Lake NAWS, Kern NWR, Lake Woollomes east of
    Delano,
    San Joaquin Valley private propertyBAIRD'S SANDPIPER*** - China Lake NAWS, San Joaquin Valley private propertyLEAST SANDPIPER - China Lake NAWSPectoral Sandpiper***SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER*** - San Joaquin Valley
    private propertyWESTERN SANDPIPER - China Lake NAWS, Lake Woollomes east of DelanoShort-billed Dowitcher**LONG-BILLED DOWITCHER- China Lake NAWS, Kern NWR, Lake Woollomes
    east of
    DelanoWILSON'S SNIPE - China Lake NAWSWILSON'S PHALAROPE - China Lake NAWSRED-NECKED PHALAROPE- China Lake NAWS, San Joaquin Valley private propertyRed Phalarope***BONAPARTE'S GULL - San Joaquin
    Valley private propertyLittle Gull***FRANKLIN'S GULL - China Lake NAWSHeerman's Gull***RING-BILLED GULL - China Lake NAWS, , Kern River County Park
    (Lake Ming), Lake Woollomes east of DelanoWestern Gull***CALIFORNIA GULL- China Lake NAWS, Isabella Reservoir, Kern River
    County Park (Lake Ming), San Joaquin Valley private propertyHerring GullGULL-BILLED TERN*** - San Joaquin
    Valley private propertyCASPIAN TERN - Lake Woollomes east of Delano, San Joaquin Valley
    private propertyBLACK TERN - San Joaquin Valley
    private propertyCommon Tern***FORSTER'S TERN - Isabella Reservoir, Kern River County Park (Lake
    Ming), Lake Woollomes east of DelanoROCK PIGEON - RidgecrestBAND-TAILED PIGEON - Bear Valley Springs/Tehachapi, Lebec,
    Panorama Vista Preserve (Bakersfield), Pine
    Mountain Club, Squirrel Valley above Mountain Mesa, Tehachapi Mountain
    ParkEURASIAN COLLARED-DOVE- reports
    for numerous locationsSPOTTED DOVE - Bakersfield's Beale ParkInca Dove***Common Ground-Dove
    WHITE-WINGED DOVE*** - China Lake NAWS, RidgecrestMOURNING DOVE - reports for
    numerous locations
    GREATER ROADRUNNER - Indian Wells Valley, Kern NWR, west of
    Rosamond, Wind Wolves PreserveBARN OWL - Kern River PreserveFLAMMULATED OWL - Breckenridge MountainWESTERN SCREECH-OWL- Breckenridge MountainGREAT HORNED OWL- Cerro Coso Community College, Fay Ranch Rd in
    Weldon, Wind Wolves PreserveNORTHERN PYGMY-OWL - Breckenridge MountainBURROWING OWL- RidgecrestSPOTTED OWL- Breckenridge MountainLONG-EARED OWL - RidgecrestShort-eared Owl***NORTHERN SAW-WHET OWL- Breckenridge MountainLESSER NIGHTHAWK - California City, Kern NWRCOMMON POORWILL- Fay Ranch Rd in WeldonBlack Swift***Vaux's SwiftWHITE-THROATED SWIFT- Galileo, Sand Canyon above Indian Wells
    Valley (part of the Southern Sierra Desert Canyons Important Bird
    Area),
    Wind Wolves PreserveBLACK-CHINNED HUMMINGBIRD - reports
    for
    numerous
    locationsANNA'S HUMMINGBIRD - reports for
    numerous locationsCOSTA'S HUMMINGBIRD- reports for numerous desert locationsBroad-tailed Hummingbird***RUFOUS HUMMINGBIRD - Bakersfield, Galileo, Ridgecrest, TehachapiCALLIOPE HUMMINGBIRD - GalileoBELTED KINGFISHER - GalileoLEWIS'S WOODPECKER - Sand Canyon above Indian Wells Valley (part
    of the Southern Sierra Desert Canyons Important Bird Area)ACORN WOODPECKER- reports for numerous locations including the
    desertWilliamson's Sapsucker***Red-naped Sapsucker***RED-BREASTED SAPSUCKER - Greenhorn Mountains, Tehachapi Mountain
    ParkLADDER-BACKED WOODPECKER - reports for numerous desert locationsNUTTALL'S WOODPECKER - Kern River Preserve, Sand Canyon above
    Indian Wells Valley, Tehachapi, Wind Wolves PreserveDOWNY WOODPECKER - Kern River PreserveHAIRY WOODPECKER - Breckenridge Mountain, Greenhorn Mountains,
    Kern River PreserveWHITE-HEADED WOODPECKER- Breckenridge Mountain, Greenhorn
    Mountains, Tehachapi
    Mountain ParkNORTHERN FLICKER - reports for numerous locationsPileated WoodpeckerAMERICAN KESTREL- reports for numerous locationsMerlin***Peregrine FalconPRAIRIE FALCON - Kern River PreserveROSE-RINGED PARAKEET - Bakersfield west of CA Hwy 99,
    Bakersfield's Beale Park (notable even
    though not currently
    countable)OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER- Breckenridge Mountain, Galileo,
    Butterbredt Spring, China Lake NAWS, Greenhorn Mountains, Lake
    Woollomes
    east of DelanoWESTERN WOOD-PEWEE - reports for numerous
    locationsWillow Flycatcher***HAMMOND'S FLYCATCHER - Butterbredt Spring, Galileo, Greenhorn
    Mountains, RidgecrestGRAY FLYCATCHER - 10 miles south of Weldon, Galileo, Kern
    River PreserveDUSKY FLYCATCHER - Cow Heaven Canyon (part of
    Southern Sierra Desert Canyons Important Bird Area), Edwards
    AFB, Galileo, Greenhorn Mountains, Kern NWRPACIFIC-SLOPE FLYCATCHER - reports for numerous locationsBLACK PHOEBE- reports for numerous locationsSAY'S PHOEBE - reports for numerous locationsVERMILION FLYCATCHER - Kern River PreserveASH-THROATED FLYCATCHER - reports for numerous
    locationsBrown-crested FlycatcherCASSIN'S KINGBIRD- Kern River County Park (Lake Ming), Paul's
    Place country store (Weldon)WESTERN KINGBIRD- reports for numerous locationsLOGGERHEAD SHRIKE- reports for numerous locationsBell's Vireo***CASSIN'S VIREO - reports for numerous locationsPlumbeous Vireo***HUTTON'S VIREO - Breckenridge Mountain, Greenhorn Mountains west
    slopeWARBLING VIREO - reports for numerous locationsPINYON JAY - Cow Heaven Canyon (part of the Southern Sierra
    Desert Canyons Important Bird Area)STELLER'S JAY- Greenhorn Mountains, Tehachapi, Tehachapi Mountain
    Park, Wind Wolves PreserveWESTERN SCRUB-JAY- reports for numerous locationsYellow-billed MagpieClark's NutcrackerAMERICAN CROW- reports for numerous locationsCOMMON RAVEN - reports for numerous locationsHORNED LARK - Edwards AFB, Inyokern, Isabella Reservoir,
    Ridgecrest, Wind Wolves Preserve NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOW- reports for
    numerous locationsPURPLE MARTIN - Bear Valley SpringsTREE SWALLOW- reports for numerous locationsVIOLET-GREEN SWALLOW - Bear Valley Springs, Greenhorn Mountains,
    Tehachapi, Tehachapi
    Mountain ParkBANK SWALLOW - Kern River corridor in BakersfieldBARN SWALLOW - China Lake NAWS, Galileo, Lake Woollomes east of
    DelanoCLIFF SWALLOW - reports for numerous locationsMOUNTAIN CHICKADEE- Breckenridge Mountain, Greenhorn Mountains,
    Tehachapi Mountain ParkOAK TITMOUSE - reports for numerous locationsVERDIN- China Lake NAWS, Galileo, Inyokern, Inyokern--MiddlemissBUSHTIT - Kern River Preserve, Wind Wolves PreserveRED-BREASTED NUTHATCH- Breckenridge Mountain, Greenhorn
    Mountains, Tehachapi Mountain
    ParkWHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCH - reports for numerous
    locationsPYGMY NUTHATCH - Bear Mountain above Bear Valley Springs, Cerro
    Noroeste Rd in the Mt. Pinos regionBROWN CREEPER- Greenhorn MountainsROCK WREN- Edwards AFB, Galileo Hill, Isabella Reservoir sides,
    Wind Wolves PreserveCANYON WREN - Kern River Canyon mouth near Bakersfield city
    limitsHOUSE WREN - reports for numerous locationsPacific WrenMARSH WREN - China Lake NAWS, Kern NWRBEWICK'S WREN - reports for numerous locationsCACTUS WREN - reports for numerous locationsBLUE-GRAY GNATCATCHER - Edwards AFB, Galileo, Greenhorn
    Mountains,
    Kelso
    Valley
    Rd--Mile
    8.0
    to
    Mile
    12.0,AMERICAN DIPPER - Kern River Canyon mouth near Bakersfield city
    limitsGOLDEN-CROWNED KINGLET - Greenhorn MountainsRUBY-CROWNED KINGLET - China Lake NAWS, GalileoWRENTIT - Breckenridge Mountain, Fay Ranch Rd (upper part),
    Greenhorn Mountains, Wind Wolves
    PreserveWESTERN BLUEBIRD - reports for numerous locationsMountain Bluebird***TOWNSEND'S SOLITAIRE- Greenhorn MountainsSWAINSON'S THRUSH - Butterbredt Spring, Cerro Coso Community
    College, GalileoHERMIT THRUSH- Galileo, Kern NWR, Ridgecrest, Wind Wolves PreserveAMERICAN ROBIN - reports for numerous locationsVaried Thrush***Brown Thrasher***Bendire's Thrasher***CALIFORNIA THRASHER - Fay Ranch Rd (upper), Kern River corridor
    in Bakersfield, Lebec,
    Wind Wolves PreserveLE CONTE'S THRASHER - California City, Cow Heaven Canyon (part of
    Southern Sierra Desert Canyons Important Bird Area), Inyokern, Maricopa
    (Petroleum Club Rd)Sage Thrasher***NORTHERN MOCKINGBIRD - reports for numerous
    locationsEUROPEAN STARLING- reports for numerous locationsAmerican PipitCEDAR WAXWING - Bakersfield, Butterbredt Spring, China Lake NAWS,
    Edwards AFB,
    Galileo, Lake
    Woollomes east
    of DelanoPHAINOPEPLA - reports for numerous locationsOvenbird***Northern Waterthrush***Black-and-white Warbler***ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER - reports for numerous
    locationsLucy's Warbler***NASHVILLE WARBLER - Greenhorn MountainsMACGILLIVRAY'S WARBLER - reports for numerous locationsCOMMON YELLOWTHROAT- reports for numerous
    locationsHooded Warbler***Northern Parula***Magnolia Warbler***YELLOW WARBLER- reports for numerous locationsPalm Warbler***YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER (AUDUBON'S & MYRTLE) - reports
    for
    numerous
    locationsGrace's Warbler***BLACK-THROATED GRAY WARBLER - China Lake NAWS, Galileo, Lake
    Woollomes
    east of DelanoTOWNSEND'S WARBLER - Butterbredt Spring, Galileo, Ridgecrest's
    Desert Memorial Park (cemetery), TehachapiHERMIT WARBLER - China Lake NAWS, GalileoWILSON'S WARBLER - reports for numerous locationsPainted Redstart***YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT - Galileo, Kern River PreserveGREEN-TAILED TOWHEE- California City, Galileo, Greenhorn MountainsSPOTTED TOWHEE- Galileo, Greenhorn Mountains, Kern River
    Preserve, Tehachapi Mountain
    Park,
    Wind Wolves PreserveRUFOUS-CROWNED SPARROW- Wofford HeightsCALIFORNIA TOWHEE - reports for numerous locationsCHIPPING SPARROW- Breckenridge Mountain, Butterbredt Spring,
    Edwards AFBClay-colored Sparrow***BREWER'S SPARROW - Edwards AFB, Kelso Valley
    Rd--Mile 8.0
    to Mile 12.0,BLACK-CHINNED SPARROW- Chimney Peak Byway, Piute Mountains
    (Saddle Springs Rd)Vesper Sparrow***LARK SPARROW - Galileo, Kelso Valley Rd--Mile 8.0
    to 12.0, Tehachapi, Wind Wolves PreserveBLACK-THROATED SPARROW - Cow Heaven Canyon (part
    of
    Southern Sierra Desert Canyons Important Bird Area), Edwards
    AFB, Kelso Valley Rd--Mile 8.0
    to Mile 12.0, off Kelso Valley Rd 10 miles south of
    WeldonBELL'S SPARROW (MOJAVE) - California City, Cow
    Heaven Canyon (part of
    Southern Sierra Desert Canyons Important Bird Area), Edwards AFB, InyokernLark Bunting***SAVANNAH SPARROW- reports for numerous locationsGrasshopper Sparrow***FOX SPARROW- Breckenridge Mountain, Greenhorn MountainsSONG SPARROW- reports for numerous locationsLINCOLN'S SPARROW - China Lake NAWS, Galileo, Greenhorn
    Mountains, Kern River PreserveSwamp Sparrow***WHITE-THROATED SPARROW*** - GalileoHarris's Sparrow***WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW- Galileo (Mountain White-crowned/oriantha
    subspecies), off Kelso Valley Rd 10 miles south of
    WeldonGOLDEN-CROWNED SPARROW- Bear Mountain above Bear Valley Springs,
    California City, Greenhorn Mountains, Kern River PreserveDARK-EYED JUNCO- Breckenridge Mountain, Greenhorn Mountains,
    Tehachapi Mountain ParkSUMMER TANAGER- Kern River Preserve (several locations)WESTERN TANAGER - reports for numerous locationsPhyrrhuloxia***Rose-breasted Grosbeak***BLACK-HEADED GROSBEAK- reports for numerous
    locationsBLUE GROSBEAK - Kern River Preserve, Lake Woollomes east of
    Delano, Wind Wolves
    PreserveLAZULI BUNTING - Butterbredt Spring, China Lake NAWS, Piute
    Mountains (Saddle Springs
    Rd), TehachapiIndigo Bunting***RED-WINGED BLACKBIRD- widespreadTRICOLORED BLACKBIRD- Bear Valley Springs/Tehachapi, Edwards AFB,
    Kern River Preserve, Lake Isabella (community of), Wind Wolves PreserveWESTERN MEADOWLARK- reports for numerous locationsYELLOW-HEADED BLACKBIRD - California City, China Lake NAWS,
    GalileoBREWER'S BLACKBIRD - reports for numerous
    locationsCommon Grackle***GREAT-TAILED GRACKLE - reports for numerous
    locationsBronzed Cowbird***BROWN-HEADED COWBIRD - reports for numerous
    locationsOrchard Oriole***HOODED ORIOLE - Bakersfield, off Kelso Valley Rd
    10 miles south of Weldon, Kernville, Lake Woollomes east of
    DelanoBULLOCK'S ORIOLE- reports for numerous locationsSCOTT'S ORIOLE - Cow Heaven Canyon (part of
    Southern Sierra Desert Canyons Important Bird Area), Edwards
    AFB, Kelso Valley Rd--Mile 8.0
    to Mile 12.0, off Kelso Valley Rd
    10 miles south of WeldonHOUSE FINCH - reports for numerous locationsPURPLE FINCH - Bear Valley Springs, Kern NWR, Tehachapi Mountain
    ParkCASSIN'S FINCH - Breckenridge Mountain, Greenhorn MountainsRed CrossbillPINE SISKIN - Bear Mountain above Bear Valley Springs,
    Butterbredt Spring, Galileo,
    TehachapiLESSER GOLDFINCH- reports for numerous locationsLAWRENCE'S GOLDFINCH - reports for numerous
    locationsAMERICAN GOLDFINCH - Bakersfield, Kern River County Park--Hart
    Park unit, Lebec, Wind Wolves PreserveEVENING GROSBEAK*** - GalileoHOUSE SPARROW- reports for numerous locations
    
    ***TOTAL SPECIES NUMBERS FROM KERN BIRDIEST 72 HOUR
    COUNTS: 2006-246 species, 2007-235 species, 2008-241 species, 2009-246
    species, 2010-242 species, 2011-245 species, 2012-242 species, 2013-251
    species, 2014-240 species, 2015-227
    
    ***79 KNOWN PARTICIPANTS: Liga Auzins, Bob Barnes, John Birsner, Gordon
    Black, Jeb Blain, Jana
    Borba, Sherry
    Brubaker, Brenda Burnett, Dan Burnett, Al Caetano, Cindy Caetano, Encar
    Card, Daisy Carillo, Jeff Cartier, Barbara Castle, Susan Castle, Bill
    Cooper, Melissa Dabulamanzi, Jeff
    Davis, Mary Dufrain, Mike Duncan, Madi Elsea, Kevin Fahey, Laura Fahey,
    Jon
    Feenstra, Gary File, Ernie
    Flores, Joe Fontaine, Kristi Frick, Terri Gallion, Bruce Garlinger,
    Gail Gewain,
    Darrin Heindel, Greg Homel, Andy
    Honig, Louise
    Knecht,
    Sandy Koonce, Debby Kroeger, Brenda Kyle, Ken
    Kyle, Denise LaBerteaux, Megan Lundin, Penny LaPone, Rod Lee, Kelli
    Levinson, John Lockhart, Harry
    Love, Andy
    Lundin, Bill Lydecker, Wayne Martin, Judy Matsuoka, Terri Middlemiss,
    Bill Moffat,
    Jean Moore, Chuck
    Noble, Bob Parker, Landon Peppel, Nancy
    Robinson, Erik Schoenborn, Adam Searcy,
    Deb See, Alison Sheehey, Mark Stacy,
    Jenna Stanek, John Stanek,
    Bob Steele, Susan
    Steele, John Sterling, Steve Summers, Lee Sutton, Shirley Sutton,
    Alexia Svejda, Nadia
    Svejda, Al Tapia, Linda Vasquez, Barb Walls, Mary Whitfield, Marcia
    Wolfe, Tom
    Wurster. Kerncrest
    Audubon Society Bird-A-Thon. Southern Sierra Research Station staff
    (Jenna Stanek, John Stanek, Mary Whitfield). Wind Wolves Preserve staff
    (Jana
    Borba, Daisy Carrillio, Melissa Dabulamanzi, Megan
    Lundin,
    Landon
    Peppel,
    Erik
    Schoenborn, Linda Vasquez),...THANK
    YOU
    TO
    US
    ALL!!!!!!!
    
    Serving as the Messenger for Participants,
    
    Bob
    
    Bob Barnes, Ridgecrest, Kern County, California
    
    Cell: 760-382-1260 
  12. -back to top-
  13. Christmas Plovers: Record Count for SBT County + Other birds LINK
    DATE: Dec 29, 2013 @ 12:49pm, 4 year(s) ago
    Howdy, Birders,
    On December 24th, I counted 269 MOUNTAIN PLOVERS at Panoche Valley, San Benito County. On December 25th, I counted 150 MOUNTAIN PLOVERS in the same areas. They are mostly feeding in one large, nearly bone bare, dry field along Panoche Road on the valley floor. At this location, Killdeer, Horned Larks, Mourning Doves and Ravens are also feeding. This is the same field that I reported about on December 20. There is a much smaller group of Mountain Plovers feeding off Panoche Road, near the Silver Creek Ranch area. There is a sizable Horned Lark flock at the second location, a few House Finches, but so far, no documented Mountain Bluebirds. Best time of day has been 2:45 pm until 3:30 pm, when the sun is shining on the large field. NOTE TO PHOTOGRAPHERS: almost none of the time have the plovers been close enough for photography.
    
    You will need a spotting scope to accurately count the plovers, and maybe, even to just see them. I ran into a father and son who were looking for them without success because they did not have a scope, even though they were in the right spot.
    
    It is very easy to submit a complete checklist for eBird because there are so few other birds around. By submitting a complete checklist, rather than an "incidental" list, your data is much more valuable. If you do this, be sure to count the plovers, one-by-one for accuracy of the threatened species.
    
    To view the written report about the MOUNTAIN PLOVERS, LEWIS'S WOODPECKER, RED-NAPED SAPSUCKER, MERLIN, PRAIRIE FALCON, FERRUGINOUS HAWK, GREATER ROADRUNNER and more with many photographs and detailed directions and landmarks, please see:
    
    http://shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com/2013/12/christmas-mountain-plovers-in-san.html
    
    This represents the highest count of Mountain Plovers in over a decade at Panoche Valley.
    
    Happy Trails,
    Debi Shearwater
    San Benito County Birding
    
    DEBRA SHEARWATER
    Shearwater Journeys, Inc.
    PO Box 190
    Hollister, CA 95024
    831.637.8527
    debi@...
    www.shearwaterjourneys.com
    www.shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com
    
    Disko Bay: Greenland, May 15-22, 2014 with Debi
    Birding Down Under: SubAntarctic Islands, November 9 - 25, 2014 with Debi
    
    
  14. -back to top-
  15. California Bird Tips? From Canada LINK
    DATE: Apr 25, 2013 @ 7:23pm, 5 year(s) ago
    I am a birder/field ornithologist from Canada coming to San Fransisco Bay
    tomorrow, and I will have a couple days for birding, one on the coast, and one
    for the interior, i.e Sacramento, San Joaquin
    
    I am experienced in Canadian birding, but I have not birded California at all
    yet. So maybe a third of the species will be lifers.
    
    I am looking for the best places to efficiently spot the following species:
    
    I am thinking I should check out some spots on the coast, and then head inland.
    Please advise me of the best regions/spots for these targets.
    
    Raptor/Owl/Nightjar:
    
    White-tailed Kite
    Red-Shouldered Hawk
    Praire Falcon
    Flammulated Owl
    Common Poorwill (where, & what time of day)
    Lesser Nighthawk (where & what time)
    
    Woodpecker: Acorn & Nuttall's
    
    Allen's Hummingbird
    Mountain Quail
    
    California Thrasher & Towhee
    Oak Titmouse
    Wrentit
    Ash-throated Flycatcher & Black Phoebe
    Icterid: Great-tailed Grackle, Tricolored Blackbird, Hooded Oriole
    
    Sparrow (Sage, Black-throated, Black-chinned, Rufous-winged & Grasshopper)
    
    Greater Roadrunner
    Blue Grosbeak
    Phainopepla
    Yellow-billed Magpie
    Loggerhead Shrike
    White-faced Ibis
    
    California Least Tern, Black Skimmer, Snowy Plover
    Clapper Rail, Black Rail, Yellow Rail & Common Moorhen
    
    Goldfinch (Lesser, Lawrence's)
    Yellow-breasted Chat
    Nashville Warbler
    Hermit Warbler
    
    Extras Cassin's Kingbird & Costa's Hummingbird (Not sure if I can get this
    without heading south of San Francisco/parallell inland areas)
    
    Also, should I be looking for Sage Thrasher this time of year If so, what
    locations
    
    Thank you very much,
    
    Christopher Mark Stephens,
    Parksville, British Columbia, Canada
    Birding Tour Leader, Pacific Rainforest Tours
  16. -back to top-
  17. Re: Chukars in Panoche Valley on July 15 LINK
    DATE: Jul 16, 2012 @ 11:55pm, 5 year(s) ago
    Hi folks,
    
    I stand corrected.
    Several experts have pointed out that the fox in my video is the endangered San
    Joaqin Kit Fox, which is rarely seen in broad daylight. I have made the
    correction on the video.
    
    Thanks to everyone who replied and shared their knowledge.
    --Sidd
    
    --- On Mon, 7/16/12, Siddharthan Ramachandramurthi
    wrote:
    
    > From: Siddharthan Ramachandramurthi
    > Subject: Chukars in Panoche Valley on July 15
    > To: "CALBIRDS"
    > Cc: "Siddharthan Ramachandramurthi" , "Sudha C"
    , "Kunal Basu" , "Narchonai
    Harikrishnan" , "Sruthi Pujara"
    > Date: Monday, July 16, 2012, 2:02 PM
    > Hi folks,
    >
    > At 8:45 AM on Sunday July 15, we saw a covey of the coveted
    > Chukars at Shotgun Pass in Panoche Valley.
    >
    > Since we were mainly interested in finding Chukars on this
    > trip, we approached Shotgun Pass on County Hwy J1 directly
    > from I-5, but on the first traversal from north to south we
    > saw nothing of note. Reaching the southern bottom of the
    > pass at 8 AM, we parked in the large parking area, and
    > scanned the rocky slopes for 30 minutes. The best we could
    > find were distant California Quails.
    >
    > It was already very warm with the sun beating down from a
    > cloudless sky. Were we tardy yet again As we were pondering
    > our next move, we heard Chukars calling from deep within the
    > pass. So we decided to drive back up north through the pass
    > slowly. There were hardly any vehicles on the road.
    >
    > As soon as we parked at the small pull-out to the right
    > (about half a mile south of the top of the pass), a cute
    > little Gray Fox (Urocyon cinereoargenteus) appeared from
    > the hillside and walked gently down the road, past the car,
    > giving us prolonged looks. That was exciting.
    >
    > There is a gully sloping down towards this pull-out from the
    > east and that's where the Chukars were. The covey consisted
    > of about 12 birds, a mix of adults and immatures. They were
    > calling and scrambling up the slope, gradually disappearing
    > over the ridge. Spotting scopes came in handy to see the
    > markings well, but the birds were too far for good photos.
    > There were also a few California Quails in the vicinity for
    > comparison.
    >
    > I've seen Chukars at much closer range in Utah and in the
    > White Mountains of California before, but these were life
    > birds for some of my accomplices as they had tried and
    > failed to find these birds on numerous occasions earlier.
    >
    > Having succeeded in our mission by 9 AM, we decided to head
    > back home in time for lunch. No one was interested in
    > birding the rest of the valley in the heat. However, while
    > driving back on Panoche Road we were treated to Greater
    > Roadrunners characteristically running across the road at
    > two different locations.
    >
    > Here's a short video (47 seconds) of the Gray Fox:
    >     http://www.youtube.com/watchv=DNov9u1yX6c
    >
    > Short video of the Greater Roadrunners (45 seconds):
    >     http://www.youtube.com/watchv=5l0Z0AkvGz4
    >
    > --Sidd Ramachandramurthi
    > Sunnyvale, CA
    >
  18. -back to top-
  19. Re: [CALBIRDS] Chukars in Panoche Valley on July 15 LINK
    DATE: Jul 16, 2012 @ 10:21pm, 5 year(s) ago
    SallyWalters & DonSchmoldt
    Sacramento County, Ca
    BajaOwl@...
    
    Hi Sidd - the fox you video taped is a San Joaquin Kit Fox! and not a gray fox.
    I worked for a environmental consulting firm for many years, as a staff wildlife
    biologist and did a lot of surveys for this threatened fox over the years; and
    have been lucky enough to see San Joaquin kit fox on several occasions. You are
    so lucky to have seen this critter!
    
    Cheers, Don Schmoldt
    
    On Jul 16, 2012, at 2:02 PM, Siddharthan Ramachandramurthi wrote:
    
    > Hi folks,
    >
    > At 8:45 AM on Sunday July 15, we saw a covey of the coveted Chukars at Shotgun
    Pass in Panoche Valley.
    >
    > Since we were mainly interested in finding Chukars on this trip, we approached
    Shotgun Pass on County Hwy J1 directly from I-5, but on the first traversal from
    north to south we saw nothing of note. Reaching the southern bottom of the pass
    at 8 AM, we parked in the large parking area, and scanned the rocky slopes for
    30 minutes. The best we could find were distant California Quails.
    >
    > It was already very warm with the sun beating down from a cloudless sky. Were
    we tardy yet again As we were pondering our next move, we heard Chukars calling
    from deep within the pass. So we decided to drive back up north through the pass
    slowly. There were hardly any vehicles on the road.
    >
    > As soon as we parked at the small pull-out to the right (about half a mile
    south of the top of the pass), a cute little Gray Fox (Urocyon
    cinereoargenteus) appeared from the hillside and walked gently down the road,
    past the car, giving us prolonged looks. That was exciting.
    >
    > There is a gully sloping down towards this pull-out from the east and that's
    where the Chukars were. The covey consisted of about 12 birds, a mix of adults
    and immatures. They were calling and scrambling up the slope, gradually
    disappearing over the ridge. Spotting scopes came in handy to see the markings
    well, but the birds were too far for good photos. There were also a few
    California Quails in the vicinity for comparison.
    >
    > I've seen Chukars at much closer range in Utah and in the White Mountains of
    California before, but these were life birds for some of my accomplices as they
    had tried and failed to find these birds on numerous occasions earlier.
    >
    > Having succeeded in our mission by 9 AM, we decided to head back home in time
    for lunch. No one was interested in birding the rest of the valley in the heat.
    However, while driving back on Panoche Road we were treated to Greater
    Roadrunners characteristically running across the road at two different
    locations.
    >
    > Here's a short video (47 seconds) of the Gray Fox:
    > http://www.youtube.com/watchv=DNov9u1yX6c
    >
    > Short video of the Greater Roadrunners (45 seconds):
    > http://www.youtube.com/watchv=5l0Z0AkvGz4
    >
    > --Sidd Ramachandramurthi
    > Sunnyvale, CA
    >
    
    
  20. -back to top-
  21. Chukars in Panoche Valley on July 15 LINK
    DATE: Jul 16, 2012 @ 9:02pm, 5 year(s) ago
    Hi folks,
    
    At 8:45 AM on Sunday July 15, we saw a covey of the coveted Chukars at Shotgun
    Pass in Panoche Valley.
    
    Since we were mainly interested in finding Chukars on this trip, we approached
    Shotgun Pass on County Hwy J1 directly from I-5, but on the first traversal from
    north to south we saw nothing of note. Reaching the southern bottom of the pass
    at 8 AM, we parked in the large parking area, and scanned the rocky slopes for
    30 minutes. The best we could find were distant California Quails.
    
    It was already very warm with the sun beating down from a cloudless sky. Were we
    tardy yet again As we were pondering our next move, we heard Chukars calling
    from deep within the pass. So we decided to drive back up north through the pass
    slowly. There were hardly any vehicles on the road.
    
    As soon as we parked at the small pull-out to the right (about half a mile south
    of the top of the pass), a cute little Gray Fox (Urocyon cinereoargenteus)
    appeared from the hillside and walked gently down the road, past the car, giving
    us prolonged looks. That was exciting.
    
    There is a gully sloping down towards this pull-out from the east and that's
    where the Chukars were. The covey consisted of about 12 birds, a mix of adults
    and immatures. They were calling and scrambling up the slope, gradually
    disappearing over the ridge. Spotting scopes came in handy to see the markings
    well, but the birds were too far for good photos. There were also a few
    California Quails in the vicinity for comparison.
    
    I've seen Chukars at much closer range in Utah and in the White Mountains of
    California before, but these were life birds for some of my accomplices as they
    had tried and failed to find these birds on numerous occasions earlier.
    
    Having succeeded in our mission by 9 AM, we decided to head back home in time
    for lunch. No one was interested in birding the rest of the valley in the heat.
    However, while driving back on Panoche Road we were treated to Greater
    Roadrunners characteristically running across the road at two different
    locations.
    
    Here's a short video (47 seconds) of the Gray Fox:
    http://www.youtube.com/watchv=DNov9u1yX6c
    
    Short video of the Greater Roadrunners (45 seconds):
    http://www.youtube.com/watchv=5l0Z0AkvGz4
    
    --Sidd Ramachandramurthi
    Sunnyvale, CA
  22. -back to top-
  23. Unusual Roadrunner Captured on Film LINK
    DATE: Apr 1, 2012 @ 8:46pm, 6 year(s) ago
    Posted today on the Santa Monica Bay Audubon Society blog site, and peculiarly
    difficult to find elsewhere, a timely article about one of everyone's favorite
    birds, the Greater Roadrunner.
    http://smbasblog.wordpress.com/2012/04/01/unusual-roadrunner-captured-on-film/
    Chuck Almdale
    North Hills, Ca.
  24. -back to top-
  25. Greater Roadrunners at San Luis Reservior LINK
    DATE: Feb 11, 2012 @ 4:46pm, 6 year(s) ago
    I was birding at San Luis Reservior, a little over an hour south, and ran
    across some Roadrunners. It is the first time I have seen any in California and
    was pretty excited about it. Here are a few photos.
    
    https://picasaweb.google.com/109282299380238524005/February112012#57079145160839
    67538
    
    Larry Cawthorn
  26. -back to top-
  27. Shoshone-Tecopa Christmas Count (trial run) results LINK
    DATE: Dec 19, 2011 @ 6:23pm, 6 year(s) ago
    Hi Birders,
    
    Here are the results of the first (trial run) Christmas Bird Count for
    Shoshone-Tecopa, CA. held on Sunday Dec 18th.
    
    13 Birder's in 4 teams from Nevada and California counted birds at Shoshone
    Village, Shoshone Wetlands, Grimshaw Lake, Tecopa Hot Springs, Tecopa Marsh,
    Amargosa Canyon, and China Ranch.
    
    We observed 62 species
    and 1046 individual birds.
    
    As our CBC experience and local knowledge improve, we are already looking
    forward to next year's first official Shoshone-Tecopa CBC.
    
    We would like thank all who came on this fine desert day to count birds,
    
    A special thank you to all at Crowbar Restaurant for the awesome hot food
    afterwards.
    
    Len Warren
    Staff Naturalist
    Shoshone, Village, CA
    shoshonevillage.com
    
    BLOG:
    http://birdman88-birdsofshoshonewetlands.blogspot.com/
    
    SNOW GOOSE 6
    ROSS'S GOOSE 2
    AMERICAN WIGEON 4
    GADWALL 8
    MALLARD 13
    NORTHERN SHOVELER 16
    GREEN-WINGED TEAL 1
    RING-NECKED DUCK 1
    RUDDY DUCK 1
    )GAMBELL'S QUAIL 32
    PIED BILLED GREBE 1
    GREAT EGRET 1
    SHARP SHINNED HAWK 2
    COOPER'S HAWK 1
    NORTHERN HARRIER 3
    RED-TAILED HAWK 4
    PRAIRIE FALCON1
    AMERICAN KESTREL 2
    AMERICAN COOT 13
    )VIRGINIA RAIL 1
    EURASIAN COLLARED DOVE 28
    MOURNING DOVE 1
    GREATER ROADRUNNER 3
    LONG-EARED OWL 1
    GREAT HORNED OWL 1
    WHITE-THROATED SWIFT 10
    ANNA'S HUMMINGBIRD 3
    RED-NAPED SAPSUCKER 2
    LADDER-BACKED WOODPECKER 3
    NORTHERN FLICKER 9
    )BLACK PHOEBE 6
    SAY'S PHOEBE 12
    LOGGERHEAD SHRIKE 5
    WESTERN SCRUB JAY 1
    COMMON RAVEN 19
    BUSHTIT 42
    VERDIN 17
    BEWICK'S WREN 14
    MARSH WREN 14
    MARSH WREN 12
    40)ROCK-WREN 1
    RUBY-CROWNED KINGLET 14
    BLACK-TAILED GNATCATCHER 15
    WESTERN BLUEBIRD 62
    AMERICAN ROBIN3
    NORTHERN MOCKINGBIRD 4
    CRISSAL THRASHER 14
    PHAINOPEPLA 86
    EUROPEAN STARLING 2
    ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER 2
    YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER 117
    SAVANNAH SPARROW 2
    SONG SPARROW 23
    LINCOLN'S SPARROW 2
    WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW 302
    DARK-EYED JUNCO(OREGON) 3
    HOUSE SPARROW 103
    RED-WINGED BLACKBIRD 6
    GREAT-TAILED GRACKLE 1
    BREWER'S BLACKBIRD 1
    HOUSE FINCH 42
    LESSER GOLDFINCH 36
  28. -back to top-
  29. Heading to Panoche Valley? LINK
    DATE: Nov 3, 2011 @ 5:30am, 6 year(s) ago
    Hello, Birders,
    
    Fall and winter are the months when many birders head to Panoche
    Valley to find the specialty birds of the grasslands, including
    Mountain Plover, Mountain Bluebird, Prairie Falcon, Ferruginous Hawk,
    Greater Roadrunner, Chukar, Sage Sparrow and more.
    
    If you are birder who uses eBird, and I hope you are, please note
    that a number of new public locations have been added for reporting
    your bird records. This is an important update.
    
    Previously, birders, especially those on long field trips, simply
    dumped all of the records under one location for San Benito (SBT)
    County, "Panoche Valley." However, upon review, it was found that
    this dumping included birds seen at Paicines Reservoir, Mercy Hot
    Springs, etc.
    
    When you enter a checklist in eBird, you are encouraged to be as
    precise as possible when you plot your location. This has now been
    made easier with the new public locations, covering the entire
    Panoche Valley. Precise locations allow eBird to accurately link the
    location with datasets.
    
    Some special considerations:
    
    COUNTY LINES; Please enter data for the correct county! On Little
    Panoche Road the Fresno (FRE) County sign is posted, beyond Shotgun
    Pass. There is no San Benito County sign! Mercy Hot Springs (and
    therefore, all Long-eared Owl records), is in Fresno County. Panoche
    Hills BLM lands are mostly in Fresno County. There is a new sign at
    the kiosk with county lines on it. On Panoche Road, beyond Silver
    Creek Ranch, the road turns to dirt, or mud, if wet. Panoche Road
    leads to I-5. At the top of the pass, Jackass Pass, there is a Fresno
    County sign, but no San Benito County sign. Please pay attention to
    the county lines when entering data.
    
    MOUNTAIN PLOVERS: Due to the serious conservation status of this
    species, exact counts should be made. Estimates should not be made.
    
    NEW PUBLIC LOCATIONS are numerous. Please use the location that is
    most accurate. It might be helpful to look at the map beforehand.
    Some of the new locations include:
    
    Panoche Hills-BLM-Public Lands- the actual BLM lands. This list
    should include any birds inside of the entrance to the BLM area.
    Panoche Hills -overlook- this is the new kiosk area where you will
    find a map, toilet & picnic table. This list should include the birds
    seen along the road up to the kiosk, after turning off Little Panoche
    Road.
    Panoche Road- Jackass Pass-FRE County
    Panoche Road- Jackass Pass-SBT County
    Panoche Road- Red Rock- this is the area where many birders stop at
    the large red rock, before entering the valley.
    Panoche Road- Summit Pond- the small pond near the Summit, and Summit
    Ranch.
    Panoche Road- MP 6.71- where many birders stop to look for Rufous-
    crowned Sparrow
    Panoche Valley-Griswold Hills - marked by the BLM sign, new kiosk,
    toilet & picnic table.
    Panoche Valley & Little Panoche Road south of Shotgun Pass- this is
    the Panoche Inn store area.
    Panoche Valley-New Idria- the area along New Idria Road, beyond the
    Griswold Hills
    Panoche Valley- Recalde Road- this is the unmarked dirt road.
    Formerly it had a road sign.
    Panoche Valley-Shotgun Pass- the pass itself, where chukar is
    frequently seen.
    Panoche Valley- Silver Creek- the area where mountain plovers have
    most consistently been found.
    
    This does make for a quite a few checklists! If you have any
    questions, please contact me off the list. I hope to see you in
    Panoche Valley! It is one heck of a birding place, as well as a
    recognized IBA, Important Bird Area of global significance. As such,
    it deserves all of the detailed attention it can garner.
    
    Happy Trails,
    Debi Shearwater
    San Benito County Birding
    
    Debra Shearwater
    Shearwater Journeys, Inc.
    PO Box 190
    Hollister, CA 95024
    831.637.8527
    debi@...
    www.shearwaterjourneys.com
    www.shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com
    
    SVALBARD: High Arctic Seabirds & Polar Bears, Walrus: 28 June-8 July,
    2013
    
    
  30. -back to top-


-revision history-
v1.30 - 01/05/16 - Revamped cloud logic, optimized database queries, linked to eBird rarities.
v1.23 - 12/08/11 - Added direct link to CBRC records.
v1.22 - 12/03/11 - Corrected GMT offsets on dates. Added last 5 posts at top.
v1.21 - 11/24/11 - Added direct link to range map for NA birds.
v1.2  - 11/23/11 - Greatly improved graphing technology - separates month vs. year by posts. Added species auto-complete functionality.
v1.14 - 11/22/11 - Added cloud bubble for common thread topics.
v1.13 - 11/22/11 - Added integrated photos where available.
v1.12 - 11/22/11 - Added multiple input boxes for additional refinement, negative search criteria (eg. -keyword).
v1.11 - 11/22/11 - Added banding code, species look-up. Also direct link to recent eBird observations.
 v1.1 - 11/22/11 - Added 'date' functionality. Shows top 'month/year' combinations for a query. Restrict results to that 'month/year'.
 v1.0 - 11/21/11 - Initial version coded. Currently archiving 'lacobirds' and 'calbirds'.