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 Month/Year Breakdown (Top 15):

 Sep, 2009 - 8 e-mail(s)...
 Oct, 2011 - 5 e-mail(s)...
 Oct, 2013 - 5 e-mail(s)...
 Jul, 2010 - 4 e-mail(s)...
 Jun, 2018 - 4 e-mail(s)...
 Feb, 2014 - 4 e-mail(s)...
 Dec, 2009 - 3 e-mail(s)...
 Oct, 2016 - 3 e-mail(s)...
 Oct, 2003 - 3 e-mail(s)...
 Jan, 2011 - 2 e-mail(s)...
 Feb, 2013 - 2 e-mail(s)...
 Mar, 2005 - 2 e-mail(s)...
 Mar, 2015 - 2 e-mail(s)...
 Feb, 2016 - 1 e-mail(s)...
 Jan, 2010 - 1 e-mail(s)...



   Black Vulture
Black Vulture
Coragyps atratus


   Black Vulture (Coragyps atratus) - BLVU (recent eBird sightings, view CBRC records, range map
)

  1. Re: [CALBIRDS] CBRC review and request for documentation LINK
    DATE: Jun 1, 2018 @ 5:01pm, 18 day(s) ago
    Tom
    The part about people deleting their eBird records/photos makes sense!
    Tom
    
    On Fri, Jun 1, 2018, 3:28 PM Thomas Benson tbenson@... [CALBIRDS] < CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com > wrote:
    
    Tom, eBird and the CBRC are two separate entities. Submitting documentation to one does not mean you have submitted documentation to the other. The CBRC reviews records
    of statewide significance, and we maintain our own archives so that we or others are able to review that documentation at a later date if necessary. If we relied on eBird to archive our documentation, there is the possibility that a user could delete his/her
    photos or checklists, or alter the descriptions, defeating the purpose of an archive. There is no plan to merge these processes in the future. Tom
    Thomas A. Benson Secretary, California Bird Records Committee From: T.G. Miko [mailto: tgmiko@... ]
    
    Sent: Friday, June 1, 2018 3:11 PM
    
    To: Thomas Benson < TBenson@... >
    
    Cc: CALBIRDS < CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com >
    
    Subject: Re: [CALBIRDS] CBRC review and request for documentation Tom et Al, I apologise for this question if I, or others have asked this in the past:
    If we posted photos into our eBird entries, why do you need our photos or written descriptions Is there a plan to merge these processes in the future
    Tom Miko
    Claremont LA County
    909.241.3300
    On Fri, Jun 1, 2018, 2:51 PM Thomas Benson
    tbenson@... [CALBIRDS] < CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com > wrote:
    
    California birders,
    
    The California Bird Records Committee (CBRC) will begin reviewing the following records in late June. If you have any documentation to submit for these records, please do so as soon as possible. Feel free to forward this request to local listservs as appropriate.
    Thank you.
    
    Tom
    
    Thomas A. Benson
    Secretary, California Bird Records Committee
    
    King Eider 2018-008 4 Jan 2018 Sutro Baths SF (single observer, documentation complete)
    Buff-collared Nightjar 2018-029 28 Mar 2018 Corona RIV (single observer, documentation complete)
    Marsh Sandpiper 2018-033 15-21 Apr 2018 Yolo Bypass YOL (documentation from 4 observers, addl doc. requested)
    Thick-billed Murre 2018-004 9-19 Mar 2018 Redwood Natl Park DN (single observer, documentation complete)
    Black Vulture 2018-012 22-29 Jan 2018 Doran Reg. Park SON (no documentation received, documentation requested)
    Black Vulture 2018-023 15 Feb-6 Mar 2018 Davenport/Ano Nuevo SCZ/SM (documentation from 3 observers, addl doc. requested)
    Black Vulture 2018-024 12 Feb 2018 Bolinas MRN (single observer, documentation complete)
    Blue-headed Vireo 2018-027 14 Feb-27 Mar 2018 LA River LA (documentation from 3 observers, addl doc. requested)
    Golden-winged Warbler 2018-04522 May 2018 Zzyzx SBE (single observer, documentation complete)
    Graces Warbler 2018-042 5 May 2018 Blue Ridge LA (single observer, documentation complete)
    
    What kind of documentation should one submit to the CBRC Following are some guidelines for submitting media and written descriptions that will be useful for helping the CBRC evaluate records and archive documentation. Documentation may be submitted directly
    to the secretary via email ( secretary@... ) , or by using the online submission form ( http://www.californiabirds.org/report_sighting.html ).
    
    Media: This includes photos, audio recordings, and video. Photographs are usually the most useful documentation for evaluating records. If you have reasonably good (=identifiable) photos, please submit them. If possible, please crop the photos before submission
    so that the bird fills most of the frame. Also, please send originals whenever possible, and not screenshots or back-of-camera photos. How many photos should you submit That really depends on the record. If it is a long-staying rarity that is easily identifiable
    and seen by dozens of people, then a few photos (1-3 per person) are sufficient. If it is a mega-rarity that is difficult to identify and only seen by a one or few people, then send as many photos as possible that show the bird at different angles, postures,
    lighting, etc. Sometimes it is also useful to submit audio and/or video recordings of the bird, as some birds are more easily identified by their vocalizations. If relatively short, most audio recordings are small enough to be submitted via email; please submit
    those along with a brief note indicating the date and location of the recording. Large audio files and video files can be submitted by using a file sharing service; please contact the secretary if you need to submit a file that is too large for email.
    
    Written descriptions: Some written details should always be provided even the best photos should be accompanied by the name of the observer, the date, and the location, at a minimum. Sometimes a photo cant be obtained or vocalizations cant be recorded.
    In some cases, behaviors might be noted in the field that arent preserved well by photos. In these cases, it is helpful to submit a written description of the bird. Ideally, this description should be written as soon after observing the bird as possible;
    it is often helpful to make written notes in the field, or even dictate notes into the voice recorder on your smartphone while observing the bird, from which you can later generate a written description. The most important aspect of a written description is
    that you report only what you observed, and not a general description of the bird from a field guide. At a minimum, your description should include the date and location of the observation, and a description of the bird (size and structure, plumage, vocalizations,
    behavior). A brief discussion of how the bird was identified, and how similar species were eliminated is also helpful. Other useful information you might report includes optics used, distance from bird, lighting or weather conditions, length of time viewed,
    and other observers present.
  2. -back to top-
  3. Re: [CALBIRDS] CBRC review and request for documentation LINK
    DATE: Jun 1, 2018 @ 3:10pm, 18 day(s) ago
    Tom et Al, I apologise for this question if I, or others have asked this in the past:
    If we posted photos into our eBird entries, why do you need our photos or written descriptions Is there a plan to merge these processes in the future
    Tom Miko
    Claremont LA County
    909.241.3300
    
    On Fri, Jun 1, 2018, 2:51 PM Thomas Benson tbenson@... [CALBIRDS] < CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com > wrote:
    
    California birders, The California Bird Records Committee (CBRC) will begin reviewing the following records in late June. If you have any documentation to submit for these records, please do so as soon as possible. Feel free to forward this request to local
    listservs as appropriate. Thank you. Tom Thomas A. Benson Secretary, California Bird Records Committee King Eider 2018-008 4 Jan 2018 Sutro Baths SF (single observer, documentation complete) Buff-collared Nightjar 2018-029 28 Mar 2018 Corona RIV (single observer, documentation complete) Marsh Sandpiper 2018-033 15-21 Apr 2018 Yolo Bypass YOL (documentation from 4 observers, addl doc. requested) Thick-billed Murre 2018-004 9-19 Mar 2018 Redwood Natl Park DN (single observer, documentation complete) Black Vulture 2018-012 22-29 Jan 2018 Doran Reg. Park SON (no documentation received, documentation requested) Black Vulture 2018-023 15 Feb-6 Mar 2018 Davenport/Ano Nuevo SCZ/SM (documentation from 3 observers, addl doc. requested) Black Vulture 2018-024 12 Feb 2018 Bolinas MRN (single observer, documentation complete) Blue-headed Vireo 2018-027 14 Feb-27 Mar 2018 LA River LA (documentation from 3 observers, addl doc. requested) Golden-winged Warbler 2018-04522 May 2018 Zzyzx SBE (single observer, documentation complete) Graces Warbler 2018-042 5 May 2018 Blue Ridge LA (single observer, documentation complete) What kind of documentation should one submit to the CBRC Following are some guidelines for submitting media and written descriptions that will be useful for helping the CBRC evaluate records and archive documentation. Documentation may
    be submitted directly to the secretary via email ( secretary@... ) , or by using the online submission form ( http://www.californiabirds.org/report_sighting.html ). Media: This includes photos, audio recordings, and video. Photographs are usually the most useful documentation for evaluating records. If you have reasonably good (=identifiable) photos, please submit them. If possible, please crop the
    photos before submission so that the bird fills most of the frame. Also, please send originals whenever possible, and not screenshots or back-of-camera photos. How many photos should you submit That really depends on the record. If it is a long-staying rarity
    that is easily identifiable and seen by dozens of people, then a few photos (1-3 per person) are sufficient. If it is a mega-rarity that is difficult to identify and only seen by a one or few people, then send as many photos as possible that show the bird
    at different angles, postures, lighting, etc. Sometimes it is also useful to submit audio and/or video recordings of the bird, as some birds are more easily identified by their vocalizations. If relatively short, most audio recordings are small enough to be
    submitted via email; please submit those along with a brief note indicating the date and location of the recording. Large audio files and video files can be submitted by using a file sharing service; please contact the secretary if you need to submit a file
    that is too large for email. Written descriptions: Some written details should always be provided even the best photos should be accompanied by the name of the observer, the date, and the location, at a minimum. Sometimes a photo cant be obtained or vocalizations
    cant be recorded. In some cases, behaviors might be noted in the field that arent preserved well by photos. In these cases, it is helpful to submit a written description of the bird. Ideally, this description should be written as soon after observing the
    bird as possible; it is often helpful to make written notes in the field, or even dictate notes into the voice recorder on your smartphone while observing the bird, from which you can later generate a written description. The most important aspect of a written
    description is that you report only what you observed, and not a general description of the bird from a field guide. At a minimum, your description should include the date and location of the observation, and a description of the bird (size and structure,
    plumage, vocalizations, behavior). A brief discussion of how the bird was identified, and how similar species were eliminated is also helpful. Other useful information you might report includes optics used, distance from bird, lighting or weather conditions,
    length of time viewed, and other observers present. 
  4. -back to top-
  5. RE: [CALBIRDS] CBRC review and request for documentation LINK
    DATE: Jun 1, 2018 @ 3:27pm, 18 day(s) ago
    Tom, eBird and the CBRC are two separate entities. Submitting documentation to one does not mean you have submitted documentation to the other. The CBRC reviews records
    of statewide significance, and we maintain our own archives so that we or others are able to review that documentation at a later date if necessary. If we relied on eBird to archive our documentation, there is the possibility that a user could delete his/her
    photos or checklists, or alter the descriptions, defeating the purpose of an archive. There is no plan to merge these processes in the future. Tom
    Thomas A. Benson Secretary, California Bird Records Committee From: T.G. Miko [mailto:tgmiko@...]
    
    Sent: Friday, June 1, 2018 3:11 PM
    
    To: Thomas Benson
    
    Cc: CALBIRDS
    
    Subject: Re: [CALBIRDS] CBRC review and request for documentation Tom et Al, I apologise for this question if I, or others have asked this in the past:
    If we posted photos into our eBird entries, why do you need our photos or written descriptions Is there a plan to merge these processes in the future
    Tom Miko
    Claremont LA County
    909.241.3300
    On Fri, Jun 1, 2018, 2:51 PM Thomas Benson
    tbenson@... [CALBIRDS] < CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com > wrote:
    
    California birders,
    
    The California Bird Records Committee (CBRC) will begin reviewing the following records in late June. If you have any documentation to submit for these records, please do so as soon as possible. Feel free to forward this request to local listservs as appropriate.
    Thank you.
    
    Tom
    
    Thomas A. Benson
    Secretary, California Bird Records Committee
    
    King Eider 2018-008 4 Jan 2018 Sutro Baths SF (single observer, documentation complete)
    Buff-collared Nightjar 2018-029 28 Mar 2018 Corona RIV (single observer, documentation complete)
    Marsh Sandpiper 2018-033 15-21 Apr 2018 Yolo Bypass YOL (documentation from 4 observers, addl doc. requested)
    Thick-billed Murre 2018-004 9-19 Mar 2018 Redwood Natl Park DN (single observer, documentation complete)
    Black Vulture 2018-012 22-29 Jan 2018 Doran Reg. Park SON (no documentation received, documentation requested)
    Black Vulture 2018-023 15 Feb-6 Mar 2018 Davenport/Ano Nuevo SCZ/SM (documentation from 3 observers, addl doc. requested)
    Black Vulture 2018-024 12 Feb 2018 Bolinas MRN (single observer, documentation complete)
    Blue-headed Vireo 2018-027 14 Feb-27 Mar 2018 LA River LA (documentation from 3 observers, addl doc. requested)
    Golden-winged Warbler 2018-04522 May 2018 Zzyzx SBE (single observer, documentation complete)
    Graces Warbler 2018-042 5 May 2018 Blue Ridge LA (single observer, documentation complete)
    
    What kind of documentation should one submit to the CBRC Following are some guidelines for submitting media and written descriptions that will be useful for helping the CBRC evaluate records and archive documentation. Documentation may be submitted directly
    to the secretary via email ( secretary@... ) , or by using the online submission form ( http://www.californiabirds.org/report_sighting.html ).
    
    Media: This includes photos, audio recordings, and video. Photographs are usually the most useful documentation for evaluating records. If you have reasonably good (=identifiable) photos, please submit them. If possible, please crop the photos before submission
    so that the bird fills most of the frame. Also, please send originals whenever possible, and not screenshots or back-of-camera photos. How many photos should you submit That really depends on the record. If it is a long-staying rarity that is easily identifiable
    and seen by dozens of people, then a few photos (1-3 per person) are sufficient. If it is a mega-rarity that is difficult to identify and only seen by a one or few people, then send as many photos as possible that show the bird at different angles, postures,
    lighting, etc. Sometimes it is also useful to submit audio and/or video recordings of the bird, as some birds are more easily identified by their vocalizations. If relatively short, most audio recordings are small enough to be submitted via email; please submit
    those along with a brief note indicating the date and location of the recording. Large audio files and video files can be submitted by using a file sharing service; please contact the secretary if you need to submit a file that is too large for email.
    
    Written descriptions: Some written details should always be provided even the best photos should be accompanied by the name of the observer, the date, and the location, at a minimum. Sometimes a photo cant be obtained or vocalizations cant be recorded.
    In some cases, behaviors might be noted in the field that arent preserved well by photos. In these cases, it is helpful to submit a written description of the bird. Ideally, this description should be written as soon after observing the bird as possible;
    it is often helpful to make written notes in the field, or even dictate notes into the voice recorder on your smartphone while observing the bird, from which you can later generate a written description. The most important aspect of a written description is
    that you report only what you observed, and not a general description of the bird from a field guide. At a minimum, your description should include the date and location of the observation, and a description of the bird (size and structure, plumage, vocalizations,
    behavior). A brief discussion of how the bird was identified, and how similar species were eliminated is also helpful. Other useful information you might report includes optics used, distance from bird, lighting or weather conditions, length of time viewed,
    and other observers present.
  6. -back to top-
  7. CBRC review and request for documentation LINK
    DATE: Jun 1, 2018 @ 2:48pm, 18 day(s) ago
    California birders, The California Bird Records Committee (CBRC) will begin reviewing the following records in late June. If you have any documentation to submit for these records, please do so as soon as possible. Feel free to forward this request to local
    listservs as appropriate. Thank you. Tom Thomas A. Benson Secretary, California Bird Records Committee King Eider 2018-008 4 Jan 2018 Sutro Baths SF (single observer, documentation complete) Buff-collared Nightjar 2018-029 28 Mar 2018 Corona RIV (single observer, documentation complete) Marsh Sandpiper 2018-033 15-21 Apr 2018 Yolo Bypass YOL (documentation from 4 observers, addl doc. requested) Thick-billed Murre 2018-004 9-19 Mar 2018 Redwood Natl Park DN (single observer, documentation complete) Black Vulture 2018-012 22-29 Jan 2018 Doran Reg. Park SON (no documentation received, documentation requested) Black Vulture 2018-023 15 Feb-6 Mar 2018 Davenport/Ano Nuevo SCZ/SM (documentation from 3 observers, addl doc. requested) Black Vulture 2018-024 12 Feb 2018 Bolinas MRN (single observer, documentation complete) Blue-headed Vireo 2018-027 14 Feb-27 Mar 2018 LA River LA (documentation from 3 observers, addl doc. requested) Golden-winged Warbler 2018-04522 May 2018 Zzyzx SBE (single observer, documentation complete) Graces Warbler 2018-042 5 May 2018 Blue Ridge LA (single observer, documentation complete) What kind of documentation should one submit to the CBRC Following are some guidelines for submitting media and written descriptions that will be useful for helping the CBRC evaluate records and archive documentation. Documentation may
    be submitted directly to the secretary via email ( secretary@... ) , or by using the online submission form ( http://www.californiabirds.org/report_sighting.html ). Media: This includes photos, audio recordings, and video. Photographs are usually the most useful documentation for evaluating records. If you have reasonably good (=identifiable) photos, please submit them. If possible, please crop the
    photos before submission so that the bird fills most of the frame. Also, please send originals whenever possible, and not screenshots or back-of-camera photos. How many photos should you submit That really depends on the record. If it is a long-staying rarity
    that is easily identifiable and seen by dozens of people, then a few photos (1-3 per person) are sufficient. If it is a mega-rarity that is difficult to identify and only seen by a one or few people, then send as many photos as possible that show the bird
    at different angles, postures, lighting, etc. Sometimes it is also useful to submit audio and/or video recordings of the bird, as some birds are more easily identified by their vocalizations. If relatively short, most audio recordings are small enough to be
    submitted via email; please submit those along with a brief note indicating the date and location of the recording. Large audio files and video files can be submitted by using a file sharing service; please contact the secretary if you need to submit a file
    that is too large for email. Written descriptions: Some written details should always be provided even the best photos should be accompanied by the name of the observer, the date, and the location, at a minimum. Sometimes a photo cant be obtained or vocalizations
    cant be recorded. In some cases, behaviors might be noted in the field that arent preserved well by photos. In these cases, it is helpful to submit a written description of the bird. Ideally, this description should be written as soon after observing the
    bird as possible; it is often helpful to make written notes in the field, or even dictate notes into the voice recorder on your smartphone while observing the bird, from which you can later generate a written description. The most important aspect of a written
    description is that you report only what you observed, and not a general description of the bird from a field guide. At a minimum, your description should include the date and location of the observation, and a description of the bird (size and structure,
    plumage, vocalizations, behavior). A brief discussion of how the bird was identified, and how similar species were eliminated is also helpful. Other useful information you might report includes optics used, distance from bird, lighting or weather conditions,
    length of time viewed, and other observers present. 
  8. -back to top-
  9. CBRC review and request for documentation LINK
    DATE: Apr 3, 2018 @ 1:57pm, 3 month(s) ago
    California birders,   The California Bird Records Committee (CBRC) will begin reviewing the following records in early May. If you have any documentation to submit for these records, please do so as soon as possible. Feel free to forward this request to local
    listservs as appropriate. Thank you.   Tom   Thomas A. Benson Secretary, California Bird Records Committee     2017-139  Garganey                       25 Nov 2017-11 Mar 2018             Waller Park  SBA                               (documentation from 5 observers – additional documentation requested) 2017-142  Black-headed Gull       27 Nov 2017                                        Pt. Pinos  MTY                                    (documentation complete) 2017-143  Black-headed Gull       5-9 Dec 2017                                      North Shore  RIV                              (eBird reports – no documentation received) 2017-154  Black-headed Gull       9 Dec 2017                                          Modesto WTP  STA                          (eBird report – no documentation received) 2018-022  Black-tailed Gull           11 Feb-11 Mar 2018                        Crescent City  DN                             (documentation from 5 observers – additional documentation requested) 2017-175  Arctic Loon                    16 Dec 2017                                        Pt. Pinos  MTY                                    (documentation complete) 2018-015  Arctic Loon                    26 Jan-18 Feb 2018                          Abbotts Lagoon  MRN                    (documentation from 3 observers – additional documentation requested) 2018-021  Arctic Loon                    2 Feb 2018                                           Steamer Lane  SCZ                           (documentation complete) 2017-155  Nazca Booby (4)          11 Dec 2017-present                      San Diego Bay  SD                            (documentation from 15 observers – additional documentation requested) 2018-010  Nazca Booby                 16 Jan 2018                                         near Ocean Beach  SD                    (documentation complete) 2017-094  Tricolored Heron (2)  25 Sep 2017-present                       Bolsa Chica  ORA                              (documentation from 7 observers – additional documentation requested) 2017-096  Tricolored Heron         25-26 Sep 2017                                  Santa Ana R.  ORA                            (documentation from 2 observers – additional documentation requested) 2017-113  Black Vulture                14-22 Oct 2017                                  Pt. Reyes  MRN                                 (eBird reports – no documentation received) 2018-016  Gyrfalcon                       3 Feb-4 Mar 2018                             Pajaro R. mouth  MTY/SCZ           (documentation from 7 observers – additional documentation requested) 2018-011  Winter Wren                 2 Jan-20 Feb 2018                             Pt. San Pablo  CC                              (documentation from 1 observer – additional documentation requested) 2018-014  Winter Wren                 28 Jan 2018                                         Orr Ranch  SAC                                  (eBird report – no documentation received) 2018-009  Curve-billed Thrasher   6 Jan-18 Feb 2018                          Woodland  YOL                                 (documentation from 9 observers – additional documentation requested) 2018-013  Field Sparrow               26 Jan 2018                                         Half Moon Bay  SM                          (eBird report – no documentation received) 2017-168  Louisiana Waterthrush  23 Dec 2017-14 Jan 2018          Big Sur R.  MTY                                  (documentation from 2 observers – additional documentation requested) 2018-001  Tropical Parula             5 Jan-14 Feb 2018                             Huntington Beach  ORA                 (documentation from 11 observers – additional documentation requested)     What kind of documentation should one submit to the CBRC Following are some guidelines for submitting media and written descriptions that will be useful for helping the CBRC evaluate records and archive documentation. Documentation may
    be submitted directly to the secretary via email ( secretary@... ) , or by using the online submission form ( http://www.californiabirds.org/report_sighting.html ).   Media: This includes photos, audio recordings, and video. Photographs are usually the most useful documentation for evaluating records. If you have reasonably good (=identifiable) photos, please submit them. If possible, please crop the
    photos before submission so that the bird fills most of the frame. Also, please send originals whenever possible, and not screenshots or back-of-camera photos. How many photos should you submit That really depends on the record. If it is a long-staying rarity
    that is easily identifiable and seen by dozens of people, then a few photos (1-3 per person) are sufficient. If it is a mega-rarity that is difficult to identify and only seen by a one or few people, then send as many photos as possible that show the bird
    at different angles, postures, lighting, etc. Sometimes it is also useful to submit audio and/or video recordings of the bird, as some birds are more easily identified by their vocalizations. If relatively short, most audio recordings are small enough to be
    submitted via email; please submit those along with a brief note indicating the date and location of the recording. Large audio files and video files can be submitted by using a file sharing service; please contact the secretary if you need to submit a file
    that is too large for email.   Written descriptions: Some written details should always be provided – even the best photos should be accompanied by the name of the observer, the date, and the location, at a minimum. Sometimes a photo can’t be obtained or vocalizations
    can’t be recorded. In some cases, behaviors might be noted in the field that aren’t preserved well by photos. In these cases, it is helpful to submit a written description of the bird. Ideally, this description should be written as soon after observing the
    bird as possible; it is often helpful to make written notes in the field, or even dictate notes into the voice recorder on your smartphone while observing the bird, from which you can later generate a written description. The most important aspect of a written
    description is that you report only what you observed, and not a general description of the bird from a field guide. At a minimum, your description should include the date and location of the observation, and a description of the bird (size and structure,
    plumage, vocalizations, behavior). A brief discussion of how the bird was identified, and how similar species were eliminated is also helpful. Other useful information you might report includes optics used, distance from bird, lighting or weather conditions,
    length of time viewed, and other observers present.    
  10. -back to top-
  11. Request for documentation for CBRC review species LINK
    DATE: Nov 17, 2016, 2 year(s) ago
    Greeting Calbirders,   As fall migration is winding down, I hope that you all got out and saw some good birds over the past few months. There were a number of reports on listservs and on eBird of California Bird Records Committee (CBRC)
    review species . If you saw any of these, I encourage you to submit your documentation (written descriptions, photos, and/or audio recordings) to the CBRC. In particular, I have included a list below
    for which the CBRC has received little or no documentation. If you have not submitted documentation to the CBRC previously and you don’t know what to include, please visit the
    CBRC website where you can find
    submission guidelines as well as a
    report form . One of the CBRC’s primary purposes is to permanently maintain documentation of rare birds in order to better understand the status and distribution of birds in California, as well
    as to preserve these records for future research. Your submission of documentation greatly facilitates the work of the CBRC in pursuing this goal.   Great () Frigatebird – Point Pinos MTY, 2 Nov: 0 reports Nazca Booby – Point Pinos MTY, 14 Nov: 0 reports Black Vulture – Bodega Bay SON, 22 Oct-8 Nov: 0 reports Bar-tailed Godwit – Shoreline Park ALA, 3-5 Sep: 1 report Little Stint – Tolowa Dunes DN, 1 Aug: 1 report Little Stint – Centerville Wetlands HUM, 31 Aug: 1 report Little Stint – San Jacinto Wildlife Area RIV, 9-15 Oct: 3 reports Red-necked Stint – Humboldt Bay HUM, 14 Aug: 3 reports Red-necked Stint – Eel River Estuary HUM, 1 Sep: 0 reports Red-necked Stint – San Jacinto Wildlife Area RIV, 5-9 Sep: 3 reports Thick-billed Murre – near Bodega Head SON, 9 Oct: 3 reports Yellow-bellied Flycatcher – Humboldt Bay HUM, 16-21 Sep: 2 reports Dusky-capped Flycatcher – Antonelli Pond SCZ, 4 Sep: 0 reports Dusky-capped Flycatcher – Point Pinos MTY, 14-16 Nov: 0 reports Sulphur-bellied Flycatcher – Carpinteria Creek SBA, 30 Sep: 0 reports Blue-headed Vireo – Fort Rosecrans Nat’l Cemetery SD, 18 Sep: 0 reports Winter Wren – Crystal Spring SBE/INY, 5-7 Nov: 1 report Dusky Warbler – Oyster Point SM, 24-26 Sep: 4 reports Rufous-backed Robin – Chiriaco Summit RIV, 13-14 Oct: 0 reports Rufous-backed Robin – Desert Center RIV, 12-16 Nov: 0 reports Mourning Warbler – Galileo Hill KER, 10-11 Sep, 3 reports Cape May Warbler – Point Reyes MRN, 11 Oct: 0 reports Cape May Warbler – Palo Alto SCL, 15-17 Oct: 1 report Rusty Blackbird – Smith River DN, 15 Nov: 0 reports Streak-backed Oriole – Desert Center RIV, 23-24 Oct: 3 reports Common Grackle – Smith River DN, 15 Nov: 0 reports   Thank you, Tom   Thomas A. Benson Secretary, California Bird Records Committee secretary@...  
  12. -back to top-
  13. Bodega Bay Black Vulture LINK
    DATE: Oct 29, 2016, 2 year(s) ago
    Thanks to Mark Stephenson’s post to North Bay Birds I finally got to see and photograph the Black Vulture at the entrance to Doran Park, Bodega Bay (in Sonoma County on Highway 1).  I have posted five of my photos to my website and if you would like to view them the link is:   http://ronstorey.com/BlackVulture/   I hope you enjoy the photographs.   Ron Storey Petaluma
  14. -back to top-
  15. RE: [CALBIRDS] Pine Warbler- Sonoma County, 10/12 LINK
    DATE: Oct 13, 2016 @ 11:17pm, 2 year(s) ago
    Hello,
    
    I want to add that the Pine Warbler at Owl Canyon was definitely seen the day before (Tuesday 10/11/16) by Don Kirker and myself. We have both looked at the photos taken on 10/12 and agree that it is the same bird that we saw on 10/11. We found it late in the day on 10/11 in the pines at the entrance to Owl Canyon. We weren’t able to identify it beyond Blackpoll/Bay-breasted/Pine Warbler due to the fading light and the brief looks that we got. Unfortunately, neither of us had our cameras. I posted the sighting to NorthBayBirds late on 10/11.
    
    Alan Wight
    
    Petaluma, CA
    
    From: CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com [mailto: CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Dan Nelson birdsurf64@... [CALBIRDS]
    
    Sent: Wednesday, October 12, 2016 10:59 PM
    
    To: CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com
    
    Subject: [CALBIRDS] Pine Warbler- Sonoma County, 10/12
    
    Hi CALBirders,
    
    This time, I thought I should include the info.
    
    There was a imm. PINE WARBLER at Bodega Bay's "Owl Canyon" today, on the W. side of Bodega Harbor. It was seen in the
    
    pines over the path leading up into the canyon, as well as the remote pine about 150 M. north. That is where David Hofmann first photographed it. It later returned to the path area, and was seen by many. Here it foraged in all the various pines, accompanied by a fem. Townsend's Warbler much of the time. The bird was rather pale and light yellow, unlike the dark almost brownish one I photographed at Pt. Reyes/ Mendoza back in Oct. 85'- - the only other PIWA I've seen in N. Cal.. I still presumed the bird to be a female, as I would have expected a male to be a bit yellower. This is the first record for Sonoma County, and may have been seen the previous day but not identified until today.
    
    When I first arrived, other previous visitors had reported to me a Blackpoll Warbler, to which I replied "It's about time" as they have proven scarce here this fall. However, this "Blackpoll" actually turned out to be the Pine Warbler.
    
    Murray Berner, Brook O'Connor, myself and others all got good photos, the bird was seen by about 10 people.
    
    Unfortunately, by 1 PM the bird could not be refound; but the overcast skies were thickening back into a uniform ceiling so hopefully the bird will stick around another day or two. A number of birders arrived in mid-afternoon and missed the bird, but for consolation there was a fall ad. male MAGNOLIA WARBLER remaining up the canyon from the previous day, 10/11.
    
    Other birds seen this week in Bodega Bay were Black Vulture, Tropical Kingbird, Ovenbird, Bay-breasted Warbler, to name a few.
    
    Good Luck, and Good Birding,
    
    ~Dan Nelson, Sonoma County
    
    
  16. -back to top-
  17. Pine Warbler- Sonoma County, 10/12 LINK
    DATE: Oct 12, 2016 @ 10:59pm, 2 year(s) ago
    Hi CALBirders,
    
    This time, I thought I should include the info.
    
    There was a imm. PINE WARBLER at Bodega Bay's "Owl Canyon" today, on the W. side of Bodega Harbor. It was seen in the
    
    pines over the path leading up into the canyon, as well as the remote pine about 150 M. north. That is where David Hofmann first photographed it. It later returned to the path area, and was seen by many. Here it foraged in all the various pines, accompanied by a fem. Townsend's Warbler much of the time. The bird was rather pale and light yellow, unlike the dark almost brownish one I photographed at Pt. Reyes/ Mendoza back in Oct. 85'- - the only other PIWA I've seen in N. Cal.. I still presumed the bird to be a female, as I would have expected a male to be a bit yellower. This is the first record for Sonoma County, and may have been seen the previous day but not identified until today.
    
    When I first arrived, other previous visitors had reported to me a Blackpoll Warbler, to which I replied "It's about time" as they have proven scarce here this fall. However, this "Blackpoll" actually turned out to be the Pine Warbler.
    
    Murray Berner, Brook O'Connor, myself and others all got good photos, the bird was seen by about 10 people.
    
    Unfortunately, by 1 PM the bird could not be refound; but the overcast skies were thickening back into a uniform ceiling so hopefully the bird will stick around another day or two. A number of birders arrived in mid-afternoon and missed the bird, but for consolation there was a fall ad. male MAGNOLIA WARBLER remaining up the canyon from the previous day, 10/11.
    
    Other birds seen this week in Bodega Bay were Black Vulture, Tropical Kingbird, Ovenbird, Bay-breasted Warbler, to name a few.
    
    Good Luck, and Good Birding,
    
    ~Dan Nelson, Sonoma County
  18. -back to top-
  19. Black Vulture, Laguna Lake, San Luis Obispo LINK
    DATE: Mar 28, 2016, 2 year(s) ago
    The Black Vulture continues in San Luis Obispo County. This morning it was with Turkey Vultures at Laguna Lake in the City of San Luis Obispo.A couple of photos are at https://www.flickr.com/photos/tedell/ .
    
    The bird has been irregularly seen between Cayucos and the City of San Luis Obispo since Feb 2013. This is the third report this winter, the other two were at Morro Rock (Morro Bay) in December and at Cal Poly State University (San Luis Obispo) this past February. It has never been seen in the county between the end of April and the beginning of October.
    
    Tom Edell Cayucos, CA
  20. -back to top-
  21. Black Vulture LINK
    DATE: Feb 14, 2016 @ 8:31am, 2 year(s) ago
    No BLVU by the Grant Brown Engineering Building at Cal Poly in San Luis Obispo this morning. This is where Herb Elliott and Kerry Runkle photographed it yesterday afternoon.
    
    There are Turkey Vultures feeding on something dead in the creek across the road from the building and the BLVU may visit here during the day.
    
    The BLVU was last seen at Morro Rock in early December, so it's been in the area for a while.
    
    Tom Edell
    Cayucos, CA
    
    Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone
  22. -back to top-
  23. Black Vulture back in Santa Barbara County LINK
    DATE: Aug 31, 2015 @ 2:56pm, 3 year(s) ago
    For those of you who like to try to keep track of the Black Vulture(s) in the 805 area: one was seen yesterday and today in Solvang, Santa Barbara County:
    
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/van_dam/21029595192/
    
    Wim van Dam (Solvang, Santa Barbara County, CA)
    ---
    
    
  24. -back to top-
  25. Monterey Black Vulture LINK
    DATE: May 15, 2015 @ 4:07pm, 3 year(s) ago
    Yesterday (Thursday) at about 11:30 in the morning, I had a (the) Black Vulture circling over State Route One with a group of eleven Turkey Vultures in Monterey County. The location was about one mile north of Pacific Valley. Not sure if this is the same individual that has been reported in Santa Barbara and/or San Luis Obispo Counties of late.
    
    I tried posting this late yesterday afternoon and just realized I had not seen the post in my "New Mail" folder. Sorry for the delay...
    Greg Smith
    Morro Bay, CA
    www.flickr.com/photos/slobirdr
    
    
  26. -back to top-
  27. Black Vulture - Stenner Creek Road, 3/28 LINK
    DATE: Mar 28, 2015 @ 3:16pm, 3 year(s) ago
  28. -back to top-
  29. Mendocino Brown Shrike and Marin Black Vulture Mar 22 LINK
    DATE: Mar 23, 2015 @ 12:54pm, 3 year(s) ago
  30. -back to top-


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