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Last 5 Posts:
· San Diego Pelagics (May 19, 2018)
· RE: [CALBIRDS] CBRC News: Two new species accepted to CA list (May 14, 2018)
· CBRC News: Two new species accepted to CA list (May 14, 2018)
· Re: [CALBIRDS] Glossy Ibis or Hybrid ID suggestion (May 14, 2018)
· Re: [CALBIRDS] Glossy Ibis or Hybrid ID suggestion (May 13, 2018)
  1. San Diego Pelagics LINK
    DATE: May 19, 2018 @ 9:36am, 2 day(s) ago
    For those interested in pelagic trips out of San Diego, note that all of our Buena Vista Audubon/San Diego Pelagics trips will now be departing from H&M Landing, 2803 Emerson St., San Diego, 92106, which is just a short walk to the right of our old departure point. The parking lot and on-street parking options are the same as always. Our two Spring trips are tomorrow, May 20th, and Sunday, June 10th.
    You can find out more about our trips at sandiegopelagics.com. Reservations can be made through H&M Landing by calling (619) 222-1144, or by visiting their website at hmlanding.com. We hope to see you on the boat!
    Dave Povey and Bruce Rideout San Diego Pelagics Buena Vista Audubon
    
    
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  3. RE: [CALBIRDS] CBRC News: Two new species accepted to CA list LINK
    DATE: May 14, 2018 @ 6:55pm, 7 day(s) ago
    Kimball et al.
    
    There is a recent paper that resolves the Citrine Wagtail issue:
    
    Drovetski et. Al. 2018. Multi-locus reassessment of a striking discord
    
    between mtDNA gene trees and taxonomy across two congeneric species
    
    complexes. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 120 (2018) 43-52.
    
    https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1055790317304347via%3Dih
    
    ub
    
    They suggest that the mitochondrial data misrepresents the actual
    
    evolutionary history of the lineages, but sorts out on geography. But the
    
    multi-locus data confirm the traditional taxonomy. The bottom line is, that
    
    the Old School taxonomy is correct, and for birders that means that if it
    
    looks like a Citrine Wagtail, it is a Citrine Wagtail.
    
    Regards
    
    Alvaro
    
    Alvaro Jaramillo
    
    alvaro@...
    
    www.alvarosadventures.com
    
    From: CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com < CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com > On Behalf Of
    
    Kimball Garrett kgarrett@... [CALBIRDS]
    
    Sent: Monday, May 14, 2018 2:57 PM
    
    To: CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com
    
    Subject: [CALBIRDS] CBRC News: Two new species accepted to CA list
    
    Birders,
    
    The California Bird Records Committee has accepted records of two species
    
    new to the California state list:
    
    Band-rumped Storm-Petrel (Oceanodroma castro) at SE Farallon Island, San
    
    Francisco Co., 10-11 Nov 2017 (2017-130); and
    
    Citrine Wagtail (Motacilla citreola) at Yolo Bypass, Yolo Co., 15-16 Dec
    
    2017 (2017-160)
    
    Note that each of these species comes with taxonomic uncertainties.
    
    "Band-rumped Storm-Petrel" may represent a complex of several species; there
    
    are perhaps four distinct populations within the Pacific Ocean alone, and
    
    each of these differs from the up-to-five distinct taxa in the Atlantic
    
    Ocean (see Petrels, Albatrosses and Storm-Petrels of North America by S. N.
    
    G. Howell, Princeton Univ. Press, 2012). Citrine Wagtail and
    
    Eastern/Western Yellow Wagtails form another confusing complex (see Pipits
    
    and Wagtails by P. Alstrom and K. Mild, Princeton Univ. Press, 2003); mtDNA
    
    work had suggested that the two clades of Citrine Wagtail were each more
    
    closely related to different Yellow Wagtail clades than to each other, but
    
    nuclear DNA work appears to confirm the distinctness, and monophyly, of
    
    Citrine Wagtail.
    
    Another potential state first, a Hawfinch (Coccothraustes coccothraustes)
    
    aboard a ship offshore of San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara Counties, 17 May
    
    2016 (2016-150), was not accepted due to questionable natural occurrence.
    
    The addition of the storm-petrel and wagtail brings the California state
    
    list to 671 species. Thanks to Joe Morlan, the CBRC web site has already
    
    been updated with this information: https://www.californiabirds.org/
    
    Kimball L. Garrett
    
    [CBRC Spokesperson]
    
    Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County
    
    900 Exposition Blvd.
    
    Los Angeles, CA 90007 USA
    
    kgarrett@...
    
    
  4. -back to top-
  5. CBRC News: Two new species accepted to CA list LINK
    DATE: May 14, 2018 @ 2:56pm, 7 day(s) ago
    Birders,   The California Bird Records Committee has accepted records of two species new to the California state list:   Band-rumped Storm-Petrel ( Oceanodroma castro ) at SE Farallon Island, San Francisco Co., 10-11 Nov 2017 (2017-130); and Citrine Wagtail ( Motacilla citreola ) at Yolo Bypass, Yolo Co., 15-16 Dec 2017 (2017-160)
      Note that each of these species comes with taxonomic uncertainties.  “Band-rumped Storm-Petrel” may represent a complex of several species; there are perhaps four distinct
    populations within the Pacific Ocean alone, and each of these differs from the up-to-five distinct taxa in the Atlantic Ocean (see
    Petrels, Albatrosses and Storm-Petrels of North America by S. N. G. Howell, Princeton Univ. Press, 2012).  Citrine Wagtail and Eastern/Western Yellow Wagtails form another confusing complex (see
    Pipits and Wagtails by P. Alstrom and K. Mild, Princeton Univ. Press, 2003); mtDNA work had suggested that the two clades of Citrine Wagtail were each more closely related to different Yellow Wagtail clades than to each other, but nuclear DNA work appears
    to confirm the distinctness, and monophyly, of Citrine Wagtail.   Another potential state first, a Hawfinch ( Coccothraustes coccothraustes ) aboard a ship offshore of San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara Counties, 17 May 2016 (2016-150),
    was not accepted due to questionable natural occurrence.   The addition of the storm-petrel and wagtail brings the California state list to 671 species. Thanks to Joe Morlan, the CBRC web site has already been updated with this
    information:   https://www.californiabirds.org/   Kimball L. Garrett [CBRC Spokesperson] Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County 900 Exposition Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90007 USA kgarrett@...  
  6. -back to top-
  7. Re: [CALBIRDS] Glossy Ibis or Hybrid ID suggestion LINK
    DATE: May 14, 2018 @ 3:38am, 8 day(s) ago
    Re: Ibises, It's worth checking out this thread from LABIRD-L:
    
    http://losbird.org/plegadis.html
    
    That's LA as in Louisiana, not Los Angeles; and both species do occur there.
    
    tl;dr: These species are much tougher to separate than we usually
    
    think; hybrids make the ID even tougher; this is an area of active
    
    research; and it really needs expert attention.
    
    On Sun, May 13, 2018 at 7:46 PM, stevestump@... [CALBIRDS]
    
    < CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com > wrote:
    > 5/13/2018 4:45 PM
    
    >
    
    > This morning I found an Ibis that I would like input on. I entered it into eBird as a Hybrid Glossy x White-faced because of the pink ankles and knees. Is it possible to be a Glossy Ibis See the pics on my checklist. Lassen County, Susanville WWTP. Thanks, Steve Stump
    
    >
    
    > https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S45632515
    
    >
    
    > ------------------------------------
    
    > Posted by: stevestump@...
    
    > ------------------------------------
    
    >
    
    > Unsubscribe: mailto: CALBIRDS-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
    
    > Website: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/CALBIRDS
    
    > Listowners: mailto: CALBIRDS-owner@yahoogroups.com
    
    >
    
    > For vacation suspension of mail go to the website. Click on Edit My Membership and set your mail option to No Email. Or, send a blank email to these addresses:
    
    > Turn off email delivery: mailto: CALBIRDS-nomail@yahoogroups.com
    
    > Resume email delivery: mailto: CALBIRDS-normal@yahoogroups.com
    
    >
    
    >
    
    > ------------------------------------
    
    >
    
    > Yahoo Groups Links
    
    >
    
    >
    
    >
    
    --
    
    Elliotte Rusty Harold
    
    elharo@...
  8. -back to top-
  9. Re: [CALBIRDS] Glossy Ibis or Hybrid ID suggestion LINK
    DATE: May 13, 2018 @ 7:24pm, 8 day(s) ago
    Hi Steve, That’s an interesting bird, and quite possibly a female Glossy
    Ibis. I encourage you to submit photos and a description to the CBRC, where we
    might ultimately be as confounded as you. I’m fascinated by ibises, and
    periodically spend an hour or two looking through the myriad photos that are
    available online. I recently spent some time investigating the frequency of
    reddish ‘knees’ in Glossy, and came away with the impression that this trait is
    rather rare. While apparently pure birds can be found, like an April bird with ‘bubblegum’
    knees on Greg Lasley’s Texas website, and this May 2001 Alviso bird   on Joe Morlan’s site ( https://fog.ccsf.edu/~jmorlan/glib.htm ),
    I find it unusual enough to consider hybrid origin when present. Note that an
    interesting hybrid at the Baker sewage ponds in June 2016 ( https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S30076782 )
    had reddish knees, as well as telltale pinkish tones within its central facial
    skin. Speaking of facial skin, one thing I find curious about your bird is the
    bluish gray coloration of its facial skin, with the same light color being
    present on the orbital ring (very unusual). I looked through hundreds of photos
    of breeding season Glossy this afternoon, and nearly all of them had dark slate
    interior facial skin, helping to set off the crisp bluish borders. The absence
    of that feature, in combination with the color of the knees, does make me
    wonder if your bird might be a hybrid. However, here are photos of an equally interesting
    ibis taken on the LA River in May 2016 ( https://www.flickr.com/photos/94434086@N05/27339243396/ )
    that also sports reddish knees and lacks dark slate facial skin, yet was
    considered an acceptable Glossy. It also has a curious eye color (possibly dark
    ruby), and a strong violet cast to the tertials (see Sibley 2001). Bottom line,
    there is still much to learn about hybridization and its variable phenotypic
    expressions in these sister species, and I suggest you share this record with
    the committee. Jim Pike Huntington Beach
    
    On Sun, May 13, 2018 at 4:46 PM, stevestump@... [CALBIRDS] < CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com > wrote:
    
      5/13/2018 4:45 PM
    
    This morning I found an Ibis that I would like input on. I entered it into eBird as a Hybrid Glossy x White-faced because of the pink ankles and knees. Is it possible to be a Glossy Ibis See the pics on my checklist. Lassen County, Susanville WWTP. Thanks, Steve Stump
    
    https://ebird.org/view/ checklist/S45632515
  10. -back to top-
  11. Glossy Ibis or Hybrid ID suggestion LINK
    DATE: May 13, 2018 @ 4:46pm, 8 day(s) ago
    5/13/2018 4:45 PM
    
    This morning I found an Ibis that I would like input on. I entered it into eBird as a Hybrid Glossy x White-faced because of the pink ankles and knees. Is it possible to be a Glossy Ibis See the pics on my checklist. Lassen County, Susanville WWTP. Thanks, Steve Stump
    
    https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S45632515
  12. -back to top-
  13. May 10 cruise-ship: 4 Hawaiians, 2 Murphy's, 25 Cook's, 8 Laysans LINK
    DATE: May 11, 2018 @ 4:55am, 11 day(s) ago
    On May 10 th , some 35 birders
    aboard the
    northbound Emerald Princess were off extreme northern San Luis
    Obispo to
    southern Mendocino Counties. We were perhaps even very slightly
    farther
    offshore than “usual” and started with 25 knot NW winds, which
    increased during
    the day to 35-40 knots. Given that the winds and resultant nasty
    seas were right
    on the bow, the ride was fine. Overall numbers and diversity of
    species were somewhat
    low, and much of the transect south of San Francisco County had
    especially low
    numbers of birds, BUT….. Laysan Albatross:   very
    good total of 8 birds (for May)—3 Monterey, 3 San Francisco, 1
    Sonoma, 1
    Mendocino Hawaiian Petrel:   good
    total of 4 birds—1 Monterey, 1 Sonoma, 2 Mendocino Murphy’s Petrel:   only
    2 seen—1 San Francisco, 1 Mendocino Cook’s Petrel:  
    total
    of at least 25 included one or two birds that paced the ship for
    almost 100
    miles; 1 in Monterey and then species in view much of time
    between San Francisco
    and Mendocino Arctic Tern:  
    total of
    9—all in San Francisco Good photos obtained of all three
    pterodromas. --Paul Lehman
  14. -back to top-
  15. cruiseship May7-8: Hawaiians, Murphy's, Laysans, Leach's glut, Bank Swallow, overall numbers LINK
    DATE: May 9, 2018 @ 7:45am, 13 day(s) ago
    On
    May 7-8, we were southbound on the “Emerald Princess” on our
    12-day round-trip
    from Los Angeles to southeast Alaska and back. Some highlights
    from the last
    couple days and the trip overall: Southbound
    saw a continuation of mostly light winds (except for the final
    afternoon) that
    has been typical of this spring (and which typically reduces
    the numbers of
    pterodromas seen) and we also “lost” several hours off n. CA
    due to dense fog. Overall
    numbers of pelagics this spring in the OFFSHORE zone where
    cruise-ships run
    seem OK for some species and clearly down for some others.
    Continuing a trend now
    for the second year, between southern California and southern
    British Columbia,
    number of most alcids seem WAY down (especially Common Murres
    and Cassin’s
    Auklets, but also including Rhinos), as definitely do the
    numbers of
    phalaropes. The
    past two days: May
    7: very light winds and flat seas off Del Norte and Humboldt =
    a good count of
    1150 Leach’s Storm-Petrels (1100 in HUM). Also, the usual
    moderate-sized pod of
    N. Right Whale Dolphins I see on most cruises off Cape
    Mendocino. Earlier in
    the day, off Oregon, we had 2 Murphy’s Petrels, 1 Laysan, and
    a good spring
    count of 20 Long-tailed Jaegers. May
    8: Hawaiian
    Petrel:   2 together 69
    km off southern
    San Luis Obispo County (closest point of land) although due
    west of Santa
    Maria, SBA. Murphy’s
    Petrel: 1 was 66 km off southern San Luis Obispo County Laysan
    Albatross:   1 seen 74
    km off San Mateo
    County (in the dense fog…) BANK
    Swallow:   not exactly
    one’s typical
    pelagic fare, 1 was 69 km off southern San Luis Obispo Co.   (We also had a Tree
    Swallow a couple days
    earlier 200 km off Vancouver Island; where also many flocks of
    northbound
    puddle ducks far offshore.)   I
    am now turning around, on the same ship, and doing a “quick”
    repositioning trip
    for three days up to Victoria/Vancouver. We are supposed to
    have a good deal of
    wind on this trip! --Paul
    Lehman,   San Diego  
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  17. CBRC review and request for documentation LINK
    DATE: May 7, 2018 @ 12:09pm, 14 day(s) ago
    California birders,   The California Bird Records Committee (CBRC) will begin reviewing the following records in early June. If you have any documentation to submit for these records, please do so as soon as possible. Feel free to forward this request to local
    listservs as appropriate. Thank you.   Tom   Thomas A. Benson Secretary, California Bird Records Committee     Broad-billed Hummingbird           2017-166              15 Dec 2017                                        Bay Park SD                                                        (single observer, documentation complete) Broad-billed Hummingbird           2017-172              16 Dec 2017-6 Mar 2018                Goleta SBA                                                          (documentation from 5 observers, add’l doc. requested) Broad-billed Hummingbird           2018-025              27 Feb 2018                                        Mission Valley SD                                             (single observer, documentation complete) Broad-billed Hummingbird           2018-028              9-19 Mar 2018                                   San Francisco SF                                               (documentation from 6 observers, add’l doc. requested) Tricolored Heron                              2017-111              13 Oct 2017-17 Apr 2018               San Diego R. & Famosa Slough SD                (documentation from 8 observers, add’l doc. requested) Tricolored Heron                              2017-136              1 Oct 2017-28 Apr 2018                 San Diego Bay SD                                             (documentation from 3 observers, add’l doc. requested) Greater Pewee                                 2017-114              12-29 Oct 2017                                  Pacific Palisades LA                                          (documentation from 5 observers, add’l doc. requested) Greater Pewee                                 2017-151              5 Dec 2017-16 Apr 2018                 Balboa Park SD                                                  (documentation from 7 observers, add’l doc. requested) Dusky-capped Flycatcher              2017-145              29 Nov-1 Dec 2017                           Crab Park HUM                                                 (documentation from 3 observers, add’l doc. requested) Dusky-capped Flycatcher              2017-146              1 Dec 2017-3 Apr 2018                   Ladera Park LA                                                   (documentation from 1 observer, add’l doc. requested) Dusky-capped Flycatcher              2017-157              15 Dec 2017-12 Jan 2018               Berry Park SD                                                     (documentation from 3 observers, add’l doc. requested) Dusky-capped Flycatcher              2017-163              16 Dec 2017-12 Jan 2018               CSU Channel Islands VEN                              (documentation from 1 observer, add’l doc. requested) Dusky-capped Flycatcher              2017-164              16 Dec 2017-16 Mar 2018             Runnymede Rec. Center LA                         (documentation from 1 observer, add’l doc. requested) Thick-billed Kingbird                       2017-120              23 Oct 2017-8 Apr 2018                 Poggi Canyon SD                                               (documentation from 3 observers, add’l doc. requested) Curve-billed Thrasher                     2017-137              22-24 Nov 2017                                 Senator Wash Reservoir IMP                       (single observer, documentation complete) White Wagtail                                    2017-167              21 Dec 2017-30 Jan 2018               Prado Reg. Park SBE                                        (documentation from 5 observers, add’l doc. requested) Common Redpoll                             2018-005              8-13 Jan 2018                                     Aspendell INY                                                    (documentation from 7 observers, add’l doc. requested) Rusty Blackbird                                  2017-153              10 Dec 2017-8 Apr 2018                 Almansor Park LA                                             (documentation from 4 observers, add’l doc. requested) Rusty Blackbird                                  2017-161              17 Dec 2017-20 Jan 2018               Trancas Canyon LA                                           (documentation from 1 observer, add’l doc. requested) Rusty Blackbird                                  2017-162              17-19 Dec 2017                                 Mammoth MNO                                               (documentation from 2 observers, add’l doc. requested) Rusty Blackbird                                  2018-006              10 Jan 2018                                         Bette Davis Picnic Area LA                            (single observer, documentation complete) Rusty Blackbird                                  2018-007              13 Jan-18 Feb 2018                          Moonglow Dairy MTY                                     (documentation from 3 observers, add’l doc. requested) Rusty Blackbird                                  2018-020              8 Feb-8 Apr 2018                              Waller Park SBA                                                (documentation from 7 observers, add’l doc. requested) Worm-eating Warbler                    2018-003              6 Jan-17 Feb 2018                             Reichmuth Park SAC                                       (documentation from 6 observers, add’l doc. requested) Cape May Warbler                           2018-017              3 Feb 2018                                           Blythe RIV                                                           (single observer, documentation complete) Grace’s Warbler                                2018-019              5 Feb-1 Apr 2018                              Del Mar SD                                                          (documentation from 6 observers, add’l doc. requested) Grace’s Warbler                                2018-030              7-8 Apr 2018                                       Claremont LA                                                     (documentation from 2 observers, add’l doc. requested)   What kind of documentation should one submit to the CBRC Following are some guidelines for submitting media and written descriptions that will be useful for helping the CBRC evaluate records and archive documentation. Documentation may
    be submitted directly to the secretary via email ( secretary@... ) , or by using the online submission form ( http://www.californiabirds.org/report_sighting.html ).   Media: This includes photos, audio recordings, and video. Photographs are usually the most useful documentation for evaluating records. If you have reasonably good (=identifiable) photos, please submit them. If possible, please crop the
    photos before submission so that the bird fills most of the frame. Also, please send originals whenever possible, and not screenshots or back-of-camera photos. How many photos should you submit That really depends on the record. If it is a long-staying rarity
    that is easily identifiable and seen by dozens of people, then a few photos (1-3 per person) are sufficient. If it is a mega-rarity that is difficult to identify and only seen by a one or few people, then send as many photos as possible that show the bird
    at different angles, postures, lighting, etc. Sometimes it is also useful to submit audio and/or video recordings of the bird, as some birds are more easily identified by their vocalizations. If relatively short, most audio recordings are small enough to be
    submitted via email; please submit those along with a brief note indicating the date and location of the recording. Large audio files and video files can be submitted by using a file sharing service; please contact the secretary if you need to submit a file
    that is too large for email.   Written descriptions: Some written details should always be provided – even the best photos should be accompanied by the name of the observer, the date, and the location, at a minimum. Sometimes a photo can’t be obtained or vocalizations
    can’t be recorded. In some cases, behaviors might be noted in the field that aren’t preserved well by photos. In these cases, it is helpful to submit a written description of the bird. Ideally, this description should be written as soon after observing the
    bird as possible; it is often helpful to make written notes in the field, or even dictate notes into the voice recorder on your smartphone while observing the bird, from which you can later generate a written description. The most important aspect of a written
    description is that you report only what you observed, and not a general description of the bird from a field guide. At a minimum, your description should include the date and location of the observation, and a description of the bird (size and structure,
    plumage, vocalizations, behavior). A brief discussion of how the bird was identified, and how similar species were eliminated is also helpful. Other useful information you might report includes optics used, distance from bird, lighting or weather conditions,
    length of time viewed, and other observers present.  
  18. -back to top-
  19. Tricolored Heron, Bolsa Chica LINK
    DATE: May 6, 2018 @ 10:31am, 15 day(s) ago
    Saturday an hour before sunset , i saw and photographed a Tricolored Heron roosting with about 10 Snowies at Bolsa Chica inner bay just south of the tidal gate, visible from the path along PC Highway.
    
    David Diller
    
    Mountain View
  20. -back to top-
  21. Blogpost with recent shorebird photos LINK
    DATE: May 6, 2018 @ 8:43am, 15 day(s) ago
    A very quick entry with a bunch of photos of various a species in their breeding best......
    https://thespeckledhatchback.blogspot.com/
    
    Cheers Dorian Anderson San Mateo
  22. -back to top-
  23. Repositon cruise sightings May 1-3 LINK
    DATE: May 5, 2018 @ 7:32pm, 16 day(s) ago
    Leonie Batkin and I were on aHolland America Line ( New Amsterdam )reposition cruise from San Diego to Vancouver.
    
    Sightings below are from San Diego, Santa Barbara, San Luis Obispo, Monterey, San Mateo, San Francisco, Sonoma
    and Del Norte Counties May1-3.
    
    May 2
    
    Santa Barbara County
    Murphy's Petrel ( 3 )
    
    San Luis Obispo County
    Murphy's Petrel ( 1 )
    
    San Mateo County
    Murphy's Petrel ( 1 )
    Laysan Albatross ( 3 )
    
    San Francisco County
    Murphy's Petrel ( 1 )
    
    Sonoma County
    Murphy's Petrel ( 1 )
    
    May 3
    
    Del Norte County
    Murphy's Petrel ( 1 )
    Hawaiian Petrel ( 1 )
    
    ( 2 ) Murphy's Petrels were inCurry County not long after crossing into Oregon.
    
    Other birds noted in Californiawere ( 53 )Black-footed Albatross, (41 )Northern Fulmars,( 300 )Sooty Shearwaters,
    ( 30 ) Pink-footed Shearwaters, ( 520 ) Leach's Storm-Petrels ( Del Note Co.), ( 34 )Black Storm-Petrels ( San Diego Co. )
    ( 28 )Red-necked Phalaropes,( 1 ) Red Phalarope, ( 12 )Pomarine Jaegers, ( 2 ) Parasitic Jaegers, ( 1 ) Long-tailed
    Jaeger ( San Mateo Co. ),( 183 ) Sabine's Gulls,( 1 ) Arctic Tern (Santa Barbara Co. ), ( 2 ) Marbled Murrelets,
    ( 2 ) Scripp's Murrelets ( San Diego Co. ), ( 6 ) Cassin's Auklets, ( 1 ) Rhinoceros Auklet, (7 ) Eurasian Collared
    Doves together on board with a Brown-headed Cowbird.
    
    We had heard oftwo other birders on board, but were not able to track them down. So there may be some additional
    sightings.
    
    Ron Thorn
    Redwood City, California
    
    
    
    
  24. -back to top-
  25. Re: Possible Louisiana Waterthrush video from Gilman Park - 3 MAY LINK
    DATE: May 3, 2018 @ 3:36pm, 18 day(s) ago
    Based on a photo that Jeff took of the bird here in Orange County, this appears to be a Northern Waterthrush, NOT a Louisiana Waterthrush. The throat is fairly streaky, the underparts are heavily streaked and offwhite, the supercilium is offwhite and tapers off in the back, the legs are dull, and the undertail coverts are bright white.
    
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/crispystatic/40974775695/
    This ID is supported by several other local birders as well.
    
    Ryan Winkleman
    Rancho Santa Margarita, Orange County
  26. -back to top-
  27. Possible Louisiana Waterthrush video from Gilman Park - 3 MAY LINK
    DATE: May 3, 2018 @ 1:18pm, 18 day(s) ago
    Sandy sent me the video she took and I posted it on the youtube link below. It looks pretty good for Louisiana Waterthrush behavior. Open to opinions...
    
    This is the exact spot where the one was seen 16 SEP 2017. 
    
    https://www.youtube.com/watchv=UPLWmf8NqyE
    
    Jeff Bray
    Irvine, CA
  28. -back to top-
  29. Fwd: [SanDiegoRegionBirding] RBA: CURLEW SANDPIPER at the Salton Sea LINK
    DATE: May 3, 2018 @ 9:02am, 18 day(s) ago
    ---------- Forwarded message ----------
    From: Mel H via Groups.Io
    Date: Thu, May 3, 2018 at 8:58 AM
    Subject: [SanDiegoRegionBirding] RBA: CURLEW SANDPIPER at the Salton Sea
    To: SanDiegoRegionBirding@...
    Cc: SanDiegoRegionBirding@...
    
    A visiting friend from Vancouver BC Joachim Bertrands (originally from Belgium) just sent me a photo and info that he found a Curlew Sandpiper at the Salton Sea
    
    The bird was first found at 8am and is still there now at 8:50am
    
    Exact location is attached and is at 33.169558,-115.641204
    
    He has pics click here to view
    
    https://ebird.org/view/ checklist/S45212776
    
    This is the only listserve in CA I belong to please spread the word.
    
    Cheers,
    
    Melissa  Hafting
    
    Vancouver, BC
    
    -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
    
    Groups.io Links:
    
    --
    Gary Nunn
    you can find me on twitter, @garybnunn
  30. -back to top-


-revision history-
v1.30 - 01/05/16 - Revamped cloud logic, optimized database queries, linked to eBird rarities.
v1.23 - 12/08/11 - Added direct link to CBRC records.
v1.22 - 12/03/11 - Corrected GMT offsets on dates. Added last 5 posts at top.
v1.21 - 11/24/11 - Added direct link to range map for NA birds.
v1.2  - 11/23/11 - Greatly improved graphing technology - separates month vs. year by posts. Added species auto-complete functionality.
v1.14 - 11/22/11 - Added cloud bubble for common thread topics.
v1.13 - 11/22/11 - Added integrated photos where available.
v1.12 - 11/22/11 - Added multiple input boxes for additional refinement, negative search criteria (eg. -keyword).
v1.11 - 11/22/11 - Added banding code, species look-up. Also direct link to recent eBird observations.
 v1.1 - 11/22/11 - Added 'date' functionality. Shows top 'month/year' combinations for a query. Restrict results to that 'month/year'.
 v1.0 - 11/21/11 - Initial version coded. Currently archiving 'lacobirds' and 'calbirds'.